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I have this string:

Test abc test test abc test test
test abc test test abc 

Doing

str = str.replace('abc', '');

seems to only remove the first occurrence of abc in the string above. How can I replace all occurrences of it?

share|improve this question
12  
13  
@torazaburo 1. Because this question is first result for "javascript replace all" in google but MDN is fourth. 2. it takes 3seconds to get answer in SO but in MDN you should scan all page to find the answer(and you are not sure you will find the answer). Time is gold. – Iman Mahmoudinasab May 4 '15 at 11:50

31 Answers 31

up vote 209 down vote accepted

For the sake of completeness, I got to thinking about which method I should use to do this. There are basically two ways to do this as suggested by the other answers on this page.

Note: In general, extending the built-in prototypes in javascript is generally not recommended. I am providing as extensions on the String prototype simply for purposes of illustration, showing different implementations of a hypothetical standard method on the String built-in prototype.


Regular Expression Based Implementation

String.prototype.replaceAll = function(search, replacement) {
    var target = this;
    return target.replace(new RegExp(search, 'g'), replacement);
};

Split and Join (Functional) Implementation

String.prototype.replaceAll = function(search, replacement) {
    var target = this;
    return target.split(search).join(replacement);
};

Not knowing too much about how regular expressions work behind the scenes in terms of efficiency, I tended to lean toward the split and join implementation in the past without thinking about performance. When I did wonder which was more efficient, and by what margin, I used it as an excuse to find out.

On my Chrome Win8 machine, the regular expression based implementation is the fastest, with the split and join implementation being 53% slower. Meaning the regular expressions are twice as fast for the lorem ipsum input I used.

Check out this jsPerf benchmark running these two implementations against each other.


EDIT

As noted in the comment below by @ThomasLeduc and others, there could be an issue with the Regular Expression based implementation if search contains certain characters which are reserved as special characters in regular expressions. The implementation assumes that the caller will escape the string beforehand or will only pass strings that are without the characters in the table in Regular Expressions (MDN).

MDN also provides an implementation to escape our strings, it would be nice if this was also standardized as RegExp.escape(str) but alas, it does not exist:

function escapeRegExp(str) {
  return str.replace(/[.*+?^${}()|[\]\\]/g, "\\$&"); // $& means the whole matched string
}

We could call escapeRegExp within our String.prototype.replaceAll implementation, however, I'm not sure how much this will affect the performance (potentially even for strings for which the escape is not needed, like all alphanumeric strings).

I will play with this on jsperf and update this answer again with a new benchmark.

share|improve this answer
1  
On Android 4.1 the regexp method is 15% faster, but you are not escaping the expression to search for, so this benchmark is incomplete. – Andrew Jan 19 '15 at 0:01
5  
There is an issue with this solution, if you're search string appears to contains special characters of a regexp expression, they will be interpreted. I recommend the @Sandy Unitedwolf answer. – Thomas Leduc Feb 17 at 16:09
str = str.replace(/abc/g, '');

In response to comment:

var find = 'abc';
var re = new RegExp(find, 'g');

str = str.replace(re, '');

In response to Click Upvote's comment, you could simplify it even more:

function replaceAll(str, find, replace) {
  return str.replace(new RegExp(find, 'g'), replace);
}

Note: Regular expressions contain special (meta) characters, and as such it is dangerous to blindly pass an argument in the find function above without pre-processing it to escape those characters. This is covered in the Mozilla Developer Network's JavaScript Guide on Regular Expressions, where they present the following utility function:

function escapeRegExp(str) {
    return str.replace(/([.*+?^=!:${}()|\[\]\/\\])/g, "\\$1");
}

So in order to make the replaceAll function above safer, it could be modified to the following if you also include escapeRegExp:

function replaceAll(str, find, replace) {
  return str.replace(new RegExp(escapeRegExp(find), 'g'), replace);
}
share|improve this answer
7  
This is my own function from this comment: function replaceAll(find, replace,str) { var re = new RegExp(find, 'g'); str = str.replace(re, replace); return str; } – Click Upvote Jul 17 '09 at 21:11
13  
Major caveat of of the replaceAll implementation is that it won't work if find contains metacharacters. – Martin Büttner Aug 27 '13 at 0:39
4  
@JoshStodola Regex can't parse XML :P Or u should not try it that way :P – Amogh Talpallikar Jan 2 '14 at 13:29
1  
@SeanBright you're right. I used your javascript in a php code so I had to add an extra backslash to escape. On the fiddle your code is perfect. I should have checked. Apologies jsfiddle.net/7y19xyq8 – Onimusha Jul 2 '15 at 16:38

As an alternative to regular expressions for a simple literal string, you could use

str = "Test abc test test abc test...".split("abc").join("");

The general pattern is

str.split(search).join(replacement)

I would wrap it in a function so it's more obvious what's going on.

In recent V8 versions this seems to be even faster than the Regexp version: http://jsperf.com/replace-all-vs-split-join

share|improve this answer
88  
It surprised me, as I would expect this method to be allocating more objects, creating more garbage, and thus take longer, but when I actually tested in a browser this method was consistently about 20% faster than the accepted response. Results may vary, of course. – MgSam Sep 20 '13 at 20:22
20  
I was curious myself, and set up this: jsperf.com/replace-all-vs-split-join . It seems that v8 is just crazy fast at splitting/joining arrays compared to other javascript engines. – fabi Nov 23 '13 at 21:02
4  
Very nice - also saves you from the possibility of bad RegExps when passing in special characters. I'm adding in a generic flag for "find this and replace it" in an object property, but was concerned if I needed to replace "." or "}" and forgot I was using RegEx 3 months later! – tobriand Apr 3 '14 at 8:01
2  
On my ipad2/safari, split/join is 65% slower than replace so your results may vary. – mrk May 30 '14 at 3:30
4  
And as String.prototype: String.prototype.replaceAll = function(f,r){return this.split(f).join(r);}. Usage: "My string".replaceAll('st', ''); produces "My ring" – MacroMan Sep 26 '14 at 11:50

Using a regular expression with the g flag set will replace all:

someString = 'the cat looks like a cat';
anotherString = someString.replace(/cat/g, 'dog');
// anotherString now contains "the dog looks like a dog"

See here also

share|improve this answer
5  
Kinda silly I think, but the JS global regex is the only way to do multiple replaces. – Mike May 7 '09 at 2:43

Here's a string prototype function based on the accepted answer:

String.prototype.replaceAll = function (find, replace) {
    var str = this;
    return str.replace(new RegExp(find, 'g'), replace);
};

EDIT

If your find will contain special characters then you need to escape them:

String.prototype.replaceAll = function (find, replace) {
    var str = this;
    return str.replace(new RegExp(find.replace(/[-\/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&'), 'g'), replace);
};

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/cdbzL/

share|improve this answer
3  
But what if find contains characters like . or $ that have special meanings in regex? – callum Oct 7 '13 at 11:30
1  
@callum In that case you'd have to escape your find variable (see edit above). – jesal Oct 7 '13 at 16:41
4  

Update:

It's somewhat late for an update, but since I just stumbled on this question, and noticed that my previous answer is not one I'm happy with. Since the question involved replaceing a single word, it's incredible nobody thought of using word boundaries (\b)

'a cat is not a caterpillar'.replace(/\bcat\b/gi,'dog');
//"a dog is not a caterpillar"

This is a simple regex that avoids replacing parts of words in most cases. However, a dash - is still considered a word boundary. So conditionals can be used in this case to avoid replacing strings like cool-cat:

'a cat is not a cool-cat'.replace(/\bcat\b/gi,'dog');//wrong
//"a dog is not a cool-dog" -- nips
'a cat is not a cool-cat'.replace(/(?:\b([^-]))cat(?:\b([^-]))/gi,'$1dog$2');
//"a dog is not a cool-cat"

basically, this question is the same as the question here: Javascript replace " ' " with " '' "

@Mike, check the answer I gave there... regexp isn't the only way to replace multiple occurrences of a subsrting, far from it. Think flexible, think split!

var newText = "the cat looks like a cat".split('cat').join('dog');

Alternatively, to prevent replacing word parts -which the approved answer will do, too! You can get around this issue using regular expressions that are, I admit, somewhat more complex and as an upshot of that, a tad slower, too:

var regText = "the cat looks like a cat".replace(/(?:(^|[^a-z]))(([^a-z]*)(?=cat)cat)(?![a-z])/gi,"$1dog");

The output is the same as the accepted answer, however, using the /cat/g expression on this string:

var oops = 'the cat looks like a cat, not a caterpillar or coolcat'.replace(/cat/g,'dog');
//returns "the dog looks like a dog, not a dogerpillar or cooldog" ?? 

Oops indeed, this probably isn't what you want. What is, then? IMHO, a regex that only replaces 'cat' conditionally. (ie not part of a word), like so:

var caterpillar = 'the cat looks like a cat, not a caterpillar or coolcat'.replace(/(?:(^|[^a-z]))(([^a-z]*)(?=cat)cat)(?![a-z])/gi,"$1dog");
//return "the dog looks like a dog, not a caterpillar or coolcat"

My guess is, this meets your needs. It's not fullproof, of course, but it should be enough to get you started. I'd recommend reading some more on these pages. This'll prove useful in perfecting this expression to meet your specific needs.

http://www.javascriptkit.com/jsref/regexp.shtml

http://www.regular-expressions.info


Final addition:

Given that this question still gets a lot of views, I thought I might add an example of .replace used with a callback function. In this case, it dramatically simplifies the expression and provides even more flexibility, like replacing with correct capitalisation or replacing both cat and cats in one go:

'Two cats are not 1 Cat! They\'re just cool-cats, you caterpillar'
   .replace(/(^|.\b)(cat)(s?\b.|$)/gi,function(all,char1,cat,char2)
    {
       //check 1st, capitalize if required
       var replacement = (cat.charAt(0) === 'C' ? 'D' : 'd') + 'og';
       if (char1 === ' ' && char2 === 's')
       {//replace plurals, too
           cat = replacement + 's';
       }
       else
       {//do not replace if dashes are matched
           cat = char1 === '-' || char2 === '-' ? cat : replacement;
       }
       return char1 + cat + char2;//return replacement string
    });
//returns:
//Two dogs are not 1 Dog! They're just cool-cats, you caterpillar
share|improve this answer
1  
@2astalavista: the goal of this site is to be a Q&A formatted resource on specific coding issues. If you want to replace all occurences of a certain substring, but need something like preserve certain things like Upper/lower-case etc... chances are you need a callback. I merely wanted to provide an example of such a case for future reference – Elias Van Ootegem Jul 4 '13 at 16:08
1  
@2astalavista: So it's interesting, but merrits a -1? That doesn't make sense IMO. Moved addition to the bottom, and replaced Egyptian curlies... I can't stand them for some reason :P – Elias Van Ootegem Jul 4 '13 at 16:34
str = str.replace(/abc/g, '');

Or try the replaceAll function from here:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1137436/useful-javascript-methods-that-extends-built-in-objects/1137579#1137579

str = str.replaceAll('abc', ''); OR

var search = 'abc';
str = str.replaceAll(search, '');

EDIT: Clarification about replaceAll availability

The 'replaceAll' method is added to String's prototype. This means it will be available for all string objects/literals.

E.g.

var output = "test this".replaceAll('this', 'that');  //output is 'test that'.
output = output.replaceAll('that', 'this'); //output is 'test this'
share|improve this answer
2  
Can you rewrite the replaceAll() function there for those not using prototype? – Click Upvote Jul 17 '09 at 17:57

Match against a global regular expression:

anotherString = someString.replace(/cat/g, 'dog');
share|improve this answer

This is the fastest version that doesn't use regex

revised jsperf

replaceAll = function(string, omit, place, prevstring) {
  if (prevstring && string === prevstring)
    return string;
  prevstring = string.replace(omit, place);
  return replaceAll(prevstring, omit, place, string)
}

it is almost twice as fast as split and join method.

As pointed out in a comment here, this will not work if your omit variable contains place, as in: replaceAll("string", "s", "ss"), because it will always be able to replace another occurrence of the word.

There is another jsperf with variants on my recursive replace that go even faster!(http://jsperf.com/replace-all-vs-split-join/12)

share|improve this answer

//loop it until number occurrences comes to 0. OR simply copy/paste

    function replaceAll(find, replace, str) 
    {
      while( str.indexOf(find) > -1)
      {
        str = str.replace(find, replace);
      }
      return str;
    }
share|improve this answer
13  
This method is dangerous, do not use it. If the replacement string contains the search keyword, then an infinite loop will occur. At the very least, store the result of .indexOf in a variable, and use this variable as the second parameter of .indexOf (minus length of keyword, plus length of replacement string). – Rob W Oct 29 '13 at 11:33

Not really much better than using a regexp, but multiple replacements can alternatively be achieved this way:

function multiReplace(str, match, repl) {
    if (match === repl)
        return str;
    do {
        str = str.replace(match, repl);
    } while(str.indexOf(match) !== -1);
    return str;
}

multiReplace("the cat looks like a cat", "cat", "dog"); // "the dog looks like a dog"
share|improve this answer
3  
just curious: what happens if 'repl' is the same as 'match'? than this would loop forever, right? e.g. multiReplace("my dog", "dog", "cat and dog"); – Chris Jun 24 '13 at 15:40
function replaceAll(str, find, replace) {
  var i = str.indexOf(find);
  if (i > -1){
    str = str.replace(find, replace); 
    i = i + replace.length;
    var st2 = str.substring(i);
    if(st2.indexOf(find) > -1){
      str = str.substring(0,i) + replaceAll(st2, find, replace);
    }       
  }
  return str;
}
share|improve this answer
var str = "ff ff f f a de def";
str = str.replace(/f/g,'');
alert(str);

http://jsfiddle.net/ANHR9/

share|improve this answer

use a regex:

str.replace(/abc/g, '');
share|improve this answer

If what you want to find is already in a string, and you don't have a regex escaper handy, you can use join/split:

function replaceMulti(haystack, needle, replacement)
{
    return haystack.split(needle).join(replacement);
}

someString = 'the cat looks like a cat';
anotherString = replaceMulti(someString, 'cat', 'dog');
share|improve this answer

Note: I can't comment yet, so I posted this as an answer, though there is some research information that could go in an answer. I also can't post more than 2 links,
so the links are going to have N0N instead of /, N1N instead of - and N2N instead of . (You could use the replaceAll functions to fix that).

Split+join vs. regular expression

I tested out the .split().join() vs. regular expresion replacing speed test from Matthew Crumley's answer (which also explains how to use .split().join() ) at jsperfN2NcomN0NreplaceN1NallN1NvsN1NsplitN1Njoin and though it is faster on Chrome & Firefox, it was ±55% slower on IE, so if this will be used on a site that is likely to be visited mainly by IE users, I recommend a safe pre-escaped regular expression as written in the accepted answer.

Some research later

IE is way less used than I thought it is (statistics: gsN2NstatcounterN2NcomN0N#allN1NbrowserN1NwwN1NmonthlyN1N200812N1N201407), so the above still kinda applies, but only if you are very, very sure that IE is going to be the primarily used browser on that page.

EDIT:

I've made IE, Firefox and Chrome bots on jsperfN2NcomN0NreplaceN1NallN1NvsN1NsplitN1NjoinN0N13 (Before, there was data only about a version of Chrome). Look into the source code in the top of the page and copy the fastest function. Wow! I can't believe how fast i typed function. IE&Chrome - iterative replace() Firefox - split&join (way better than all others)

End-note: English isn't my first language, so this took me some time to correct statements and English and the red-wavey underlining (indicating word not in mother language vocabulary) under most of the words was annoying too (I think there's an HTML attribute against that). I do realize the previous sentence is not grammatically correct.

share|improve this answer

If you are trying to ensure that the string you are looking for won't exist even after the replacement, you need to use a loop.

For example:

var str = 'test aabcbc';
str = str.replace(/abc/g, '');

When complete, you will still have 'test abc'!

The simplest loop to solve this would be:

var str = 'test aabcbc';
while (str != str.replace(/abc/g, '')){
   str.replace(/abc/g, '');
}

But that runs the replacement twice for each cycle. Perhaps (at risk of being voted down) that can be combined for a slightly more efficient but less readable form:

var str = 'test aabcbc';
while (str != (str = str.replace(/abc/g, ''))){}
// alert(str); alerts 'test '!

This can be particularly useful when looking for duplicate strings.
For example, if we have 'a,,,b' and we wish to remove all duplicate commas.
[In that case, one could do .replace(/,+/g,','), but at some point the regex gets complex and slow enough to loop instead.]

share|improve this answer

I like this method, it looks a little cleaner.

text = text.replace(new RegExp("cat","g"), "dog"); 
share|improve this answer

My implementation, very self explanatory

function replaceAll(string, token, newtoken) {
    if(token!=newtoken)
    while(string.indexOf(token) > -1) {
        string = string.replace(token, newtoken);
    }
    return string;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is incorrect. replaceAll("123434", "1234", "12") should return "1234" but instead returns "12". – Bryan Apr 16 '13 at 13:58
1  
it depends if you allow to replace "recursively" or not. – Vitim.us Apr 16 '13 at 16:16
4  
replaceAll("abc", "a", "ab") never terminates – user1002973 May 16 '13 at 14:44
while (str.indexOf('abc') !== -1)
{
    str = str.replace('abc', '');
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Why walk when we can crawl! – Alex K. Apr 29 '14 at 10:45

Following function works for me:

String.prototype.replaceAllOccurence = function(str1, str2, ignore) 
{
    return this.replace(new RegExp(str1.replace(/([\/\,\!\\\^\$\{\}\[\]\(\)\.\*\+\?\|\<\>\-\&])/g,"\\$&"),(ignore?"gi":"g")),(typeof(str2)=="string")?str2.replace(/\$/g,"$$$$"):str2);
} ;

now call the functions like this:

"you could be a Project Manager someday, if you work like this.".replaceAllOccurence ("you", "I");

Simply copy and paste this code in your browser console to TEST.

share|improve this answer

Just add /g

document.body.innerHTML = document.body.innerHTML.replace('hello', 'hi');

to

// Replace 'hello' string with /hello/g regular expression.
document.body.innerHTML = document.body.innerHTML.replace(/hello/g, 'hi');

/g means global

share|improve this answer

You can simply use below method

/**
 * Replace all the occerencess of $find by $replace in $originalString
 * @param  {originalString} input - Raw string.
 * @param  {find} input - Target key word or regex that need to be replaced.
 * @param  {replace} input - Replacement key word
 * @return {String}       Output string
 */
function replaceAll(originalString, find, replace) {
  return originalString.replace(new RegExp(find, 'g'), replace);
};
share|improve this answer

for replace all kind of character try this code

suppose we have need to send " and \ in my string, then we will convert it " to \" and \ to \\

so this method will solve this issue.

String.prototype.replaceAll = function (find, replace) {
     var str = this;
     return str.replace(new RegExp(find.replace(/[-\/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&'), 'g'), replace);
 };

var message = $('#message').val();
             message = message.replaceAll('\\', '\\\\'); /*it will replace \ to \\ */
             message = message.replaceAll('"', '\\"');   /*it will replace " to \\"*/

i was using ajax and i have need to send parameters in json format then my method is look like is

 function sendMessage(source, messageID, toProfileID, userProfileID) {
     if (validateTextBox()) {

         var message = $('#message').val();
         message = message.replaceAll('\\', '\\\\');
         message = message.replaceAll('"', '\\"');                                         
         $.ajax({
             type: "POST",
             async: "false", 
             contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
             url: "services/WebService1.asmx/SendMessage",
             data: '{"source":"' + source + '","messageID":"' + messageID + '","toProfileID":"' + toProfileID + '","userProfileID":"' + userProfileID + '","message":"' + message + '"}',
             dataType: "json",
             success: function (data) {
                 loadMessageAfterSend(toProfileID, userProfileID);
                 $("#<%=PanelMessageDelete.ClientID%>").hide();
                 $("#message").val("");
                 $("#delMessageContainer").show();
                 $("#msgPanel").show();                    
             },
             error: function (result) {
                 alert("message sending failed");
             }
         });
     }
     else {
         alert("Please type message in message box.");
         $("#message").focus();

     }}
String.prototype.replaceAll = function (find, replace) {
     var str = this;
     return str.replace(new RegExp(find.replace(/[-\/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&'), 'g'), replace);
 };
share|improve this answer
function replaceAll(str, find, replace) {
    var $r="";
    while($r!=str){ 
        $r = str;
        str = str.replace(find, replace);
    }
    return str;
}
share|improve this answer

If using a library is an option for you then you will get the benefits of the testing and community support that goes with a library function. For example, the string.js library has a replaceAll() function that does what you're looking for:

// Include a reference to the string.js library and call it (for example) S.
str = S(str).replaceAll('abc', '').s;
share|improve this answer

Simple...

Replacing single quotes:

function JavaScriptEncode(text){

        text = text.replace(/'/g,'&apos;')

        // More encode here if required

        return text; 

    }
share|improve this answer

Here is the working code with prototype:

String.prototype.replaceAll = function(find, replace) {
var str = this;
return str.replace(new RegExp(find.replace(/([.*+?^=!:${}()|\[\]\/\\])/g, "\\$1"), 'g'), replace);

};

share|improve this answer

Something little different by using recursion. I use p to store the result from the previous replacement:

function replaceAll(s, m, r, p) {
    return s === p || r.contains(m) ? s : replaceAll(s.replace(m, r), m, r, s);
}

It will replace all occurrences in the string s until it is possible:

replaceAll('abbbbb', 'ab', 'a') → 'abbbb' → 'abbb' → 'abb' → 'ab' → 'a'

To avoid infinite loop I check if the replacement r contains a match m:

replaceAll('abbbbb', 'a', 'ab') → 'abbbbb'
share|improve this answer

Try this:

String.prototype.replaceAll = function (sfind, sreplace) {
    var str = this;
    while (str.indexOf(sfind)>-1) str=str.replace(sfind, sreplace);
    return str;
};
share|improve this answer

protected by Pankaj Parkar Sep 1 '15 at 10:41

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