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I have an ArrayList filled with objects with attributes name and time. I would like to remove duplicates based on the name and keep only records with the latest time. So I have overriden equals and hashcode for name in my object and used code like this.

private List<ChangedRecentlyTO> groupRecords(List<ChangedRecentlyTO> toList) {
    changedRecentlyList.clear(); //static list
    for(ChangedRecentlyTO to : toList) {
        if(!changedRecentlyList.contains(to)) {
            changedRecentlyList.add(to);
        } else {
            if(changedRecentlyList.get(changedRecentlyList.lastIndexOf(to)).getTimeChanged().before(to.getTimeChanged())) {
                changedRecentlyList.remove(to);
                changedRecentlyList.add(to);
            }
        }
    }
    return changedRecentlyList;
}

But I am wondering, is there a better solution?I was thinking about using Set but I am not able to figure out how should I put there the time criterion.

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10  
Put it in a Map using the name as the key. Write a 'put' method that will check if the time is greater than whatever is already in there. –  radimpe Jul 12 '12 at 8:51
    
As said radimpe you may want to overwrite the add/put method of your container. But if you only use it here, I'm not sure it's worth the change –  Michael Laffargue Jul 12 '12 at 9:03
    
It is only one place solution so I don't that creating new class just for this is worth it. –  Petr Mensik Jul 12 '12 at 9:14
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have to me two ways, one which requires understanding how the set work, and one which is more understandable for people who have littler understanding of Java Collections:

If you want to make it simple, you can simply read in the detail the Javadoc of Set, http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Set.html#add(E). It clearly states that if an element is already inside, it won't be added again.

  • You implement your equals and hashcode using only the name
  • You sort the items by time and then you add them to the Set.

In such a way, the first time you will add the item to Set, you will be adding the elements with the latest times. When you'll add the others, they will be ignored because they are already contained.


If someone else who does not know exactly the contract of java.util.Set behaves, you might want to extend Set to make your intention clearer. However, since a Set is not supposed to be accessed to "get back an element after removal", you will need to back your set with an HashMap:

interface TimeChangeable {
   long getTimeChanged();
}
public class TimeChangeableSet<E extends TimeCheangeable> implements Set<E> {

    private final HashMap<Integer,E> hashMap = new HashMap<Integer,E>();

    @Override
    public boolean add(E e) {
        E existingValue = hashMap.remove(e.hashCode());
        if(existingValue==null){
            hashMap.put(e.hashCode(),e);
            return true;
        }
        else{
            E toAdd = e.getTimeChanged() > existingValue.getTimeChanged() ? e : existingValue;
            boolean newAdded = e.getTimeChanged() > existingValue.getTimeChanged() ? true : false;
            hashMap.put(e.hashCode(),e);
            return newAdded;
        }

    }

    @Override
    public int size() {
        return hashMap.size();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isEmpty() {
        return hashMap.isEmpty();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean contains(Object o) {
        return hashMap.containsKey(o.hashCode());
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<E> iterator() {
        return hashMap.values().iterator();
    }

    @Override
    public Object[] toArray() {
        return hashMap.values().toArray();
    }

    @Override
    public <T> T[] toArray(T[] a) {
        return hashMap.values().toArray(a);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean remove(Object o) {
        return removeAndGet(o)!=null ? true : false;
    }

    public E removeAndGet (Object o) {
        return hashMap.remove(o.hashCode());
    }

    @Override
    public boolean containsAll(Collection<?> c) {
        boolean containsAll = true;
        for(Object object:c){
            E objectInMap = removeAndGet(object);
            if(objectInMap==null || !objectInMap.equals(object))
                containsAll=false;
        }
        return containsAll;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends E> c) {
        boolean  addAll=true;
        for(E e:c){
            if(!add(e)) addAll=false;
        }
        return addAll;

    }

    @Override
    public boolean retainAll(Collection<?> c) {
        boolean setChanged=false;
        for(E e: hashMap.values()){
            if(!c.contains(e)){
                hashMap.remove(e.hashCode());
                setChanged=true;
            }
        }
        return setChanged;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean removeAll(Collection<?> c) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Please do not use type-unsafe methods in 2012");
    }

    @Override
    public void clear() {
        hashMap.clear();
    }




}
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Thanks for pointing to documentation:) –  Petr Mensik Jul 19 '12 at 20:48
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Extend HashMap and override put method to put only if new object is more recent than the existing one.

Or, you can create your own dedicated container which will be backed by a HashMap, just like some implementations of Stack are backed by LinkedList


This is a mock code:

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class TimeMap<K, V> {

    private Map<K, V> timeMap;

    public TimeMap() {
        this.timeMap = new HashMap<K, V>();
    }

    public void put(K key, V value) {
        if (isNewer(key, value)) {
            this.timeMap.put(key, value);
        }
    }

}
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1  
Sounds good, but do you think that creating my own implementation of Map just for this task (and I don't need this anywhere else) is worth it? –  Petr Mensik Jul 12 '12 at 9:16
    
I really dunno. If you had multiple methods, not just one groupRecords, you'd need to implement a check in all of them. Now, imagine you used < instead of <=. You'd need to find all those methods and change the < to <= in all of them. With TimeMap, that piece of logic is contained in one or 2 places. BTW. I'd personally go with my own container that is backed by Map. –  Lopina Jul 12 '12 at 9:21
    
However, if you'd like to use polymorphism and programming to interfaces, then extending HashMap is a good idea since you'll be able to do this: Map<Key, Value> myMap = new TimeMap<Key, Value>() or pass it to any method expecting Map<Key, Value> as a parameter. –  Lopina Jul 12 '12 at 9:25
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Why you dont use a Set and later:

new ArrayList(set);
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1  
it won't address the time logic... –  Chan Jul 12 '12 at 8:55
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You could let your class implement the Comparable interface and make compare check the timestamps you are interested in. If you then sort it (e.g. put all the elements in a TreeSet) and then get them out one by one, only if they don't already exist. Something like this:

public void removeDuplicates(List<MyObject> list){
    SortedSet<MyObject> sortedSet = new TreeSet<MyObject>();
    sortedSet.addAll(list);

    //Now clear the list, and start adding them again
    list.clear();
    for(MyObject obj : sortedSet){
        if(!list.contains(obj) {
             list.add(obj);
        } 
    }
    return list;
}

This, however, will only work if two objects with different timestamps are not equal! (in the equals() sense of the word

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A very quick implementation of what I had in mind.

Assumed the ChangedRecentlyTO object had a name property.

private List<ChangedRecentlyTO> groupRecords(List<ChangedRecentlyTO> toList) {

    Map<String, ChangedRecentlyTO> uniqueMap = new HashMap<String, ChangedRecentlyTO>();

    for(ChangedRecentlyTO to : toList) {
        if (uniqueMap.containsKey(to.getName())) {
            if (uniqueMap.get(to.getName()).getTimeChanged().before(to.getTimeChanged())) {
                uniqueMap.put(to.getName(), to);
            }
        } else {
            uniqueMap.put(to.getName(), to);
        }
    }
    return (List<ChangedRecentlyTO>) uniqueMap.values();
}

After all of that, it doesn't seem to different to your original implementation with the exception that there is no need override hashcode and equals.

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What I would suggest , Make your class Comparable by implementing Comparable interface.Then in comparetTo() based on name and time compare them if object time is recent return 1 else 0(if equal) or -1 .Once you got this functionality you can extend HashMap class and override the put method like.

o1.compareTo(o2) > 0 then simply overwrite the object with latest one. 

Adding logic to @Lopina code like

public class MyHashMap extends HashMap<String, MyClass>{
private Map<String, MyClass> timeMap;

public MyHashMap() {
    this.timeMap = new HashMap<String, MyClass>();
}

public MyClass put(String key, MyClass value) {

    MyClass obj;
    if (isNewer(key, value)) {
        System.out.println("count");
        obj=this.timeMap.put(key, value);
    }else{
        obj=value;
    }
    return obj;
}

private boolean isNewer(String key, MyClass value) {

    if(this.timeMap.get(key)==null ||( key.equals(value.getName()))&& (this.timeMap.get(key).compareTo(value))<0)
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

@Override
public int size() {

    return this.timeMap.size();
}

@Override
public MyClass get(Object key) {

    return this.timeMap.get(key);
}
}

In MyClass implement comparable interface and override compareTo method like below.

@Override
public int compareTo(MyClass o) {

    return this.getTime().compareTo(o.getTime());
}
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