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Which one of the following two methods has better performance ?

using( var DB_Connection_s = new DBConnection() )
{
 //todo: interact with database connection
}

or just :

DB_Connection_s.Close();

at the end.

Does the first method make the pooling concept useless? Because if I dispose the connection with each use, then I have to open a new connection every time (and there won't be any connections in the pool).

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Dispose will close as well as cleanup any other resources. – Oded Jul 12 '12 at 9:02
    
I know , i ask is this performance wise to kill the connection every time and then what's the benefit of pooing?! – just_name Jul 12 '12 at 9:03
    
because i know when i just close the connection .it remains in the pool and used if it wasn't active. – just_name Jul 12 '12 at 9:05
2  
You may want to fix that typo... – Oded Jul 12 '12 at 9:05
1  
Common sense tells me that Dispose() would Close, Clean up & Free more resources, versus Close() would allow you to more quickly re-open?.. but I may be wrong. – FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Jul 12 '12 at 22:06
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Connections are released back into the pool when you call Close or Dispose on the Connection..."

source = SQL Server Connection Pooling (ADO.NET)

So, remove any worry about performance loss caused by missed pooled connections.
From the code standpoint the difference should be so minimal that the using statement should always be used

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hmmm,does this mean that if i dispose the connection ,it will remain in the pool.Then what 's the main difference between Close() & Dispose() .if both of them return the connection back to the pool . – just_name Jul 12 '12 at 9:36
    
This article on MSDN debates the difference between these two methods. Read the answer from BinaryCoder – Steve Jul 12 '12 at 9:48

The using pattern is better, since the Dispose call closes the connection anyway, but as a bonus the connection is closed even if something inside the using goes wrong. For example an exception or just a return that forces the program execution to go out of the using scope. With a using, you don't need to explicitly close the connection, which makes the code more readable. As an another pattern, the connection must be closed as soon as possible. There is no performance drawback in closing/opening the connection too frequently, because the connection pool will optimize the connection re-using for you.

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hmmm,does this mean that if i dispose the connection ,it will remain in the pool. – just_name Jul 12 '12 at 9:28
1  
@just_name, yes both closing and disposing does not make difference: a closed connection is just relased to the pool – Felice Pollano Jul 12 '12 at 10:01
    
and the disposed connection also is released to the pool .am i right? – just_name Jul 12 '12 at 10:02
1  
@just_name yes you are right, dispose just call close and close just release to the pool – Felice Pollano Jul 12 '12 at 10:23

Use Dispose. Internally within Dispose it will close the connection so you don't need to worry, this can be checked easily enough with Reflector or similar if in doubt.

As for the performance I would still go with the Using. Windows has various caches enabled (certainly in ODBC) to ensure that re-use can occur for repeated requests to the same connection and therefore you shouldn't really need to worry about the performance.

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I know , i ask is this performance wise to kill the connection every time and then what's the benefit of pooing?! – just_name Jul 12 '12 at 9:03
    
Sorry - my bad, updating my answer – Ian Jul 12 '12 at 9:09

Unless you going to call .Open() again sometime soon,

use the using(){} block.

if you are going to use the same connection somewhere else soon,
call .close(); then .open() and so on...
keep your class implement IDisposable and dispose of the connection there!

it is still taking time to create the Connection object

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