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I'm trying to create a secured restful web service using Servlet 3.0, Spring MVC and Spring Security. I'd like to return a custom JSON message on a 401 instead of the default HTML message returned by the Servlet container.

I've tried several approaches but can't seem to get this working.

My controller looks like follows::

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/")
public class ApplicationController {

    private ApplicationFactory applicationFactory;

    @Inject
    public ApplicationController(ApplicationFactory applicationFactory) {
        super();
        this.applicationFactory = applicationFactory;
    }

    @RequestMapping(method = GET)
    @ResponseBody
    @Secured("ROLE_USER")
    public Application getApplicationInfo() {
        return applicationFactory.buildApplication(this);
    }

}

And my Spring Security context looks as follows:

<security:global-method-security secured-annotations="enabled" mode="aspectj" />

<security:http auto-config="true" use-expressions="true">
<security:http-basic />
</security:http>

I've tried adding the following:

@ExceptionHandler(AccessDeniedException.class)
@ResponseBody
public Application accessDenied() {
    return applicationFactory.buildApplication(this);
}

But it gets ignored. I've tried adding "access-denied-page="/denied"" to my security:http tag with the following in my controller:

@RequestMapping(value = "/denied", method = GET)
@ResponseBody
public Application accessDenied() {
    return applicationFactory.buildApplication(this);
}

But it gets ignored. I've tried a custom access denied handler as follows:

<security:http auto-config="true" use-expressions="true">
<security:http-basic />
<security:access-denied-handler ref="jsonAccessDeniedHandler" />
</security:http>

The only thing that does seem to work is the following:

@ExceptionHandler(Exception.class)
@ResponseBody
public Application accessDenied() {
    return applicationFactory.buildApplication(this);
}

But this catches everything and I only want to customise a failed authentication.

Lastly, adding this to my web.xml also works:

<error-page>
<error-code>401</error-code>
<location>/401</location>
</error-page>

But I'd prefer to configure as much pro-grammatically or through annotations.

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2 Answers

In spring 3.0 there is a annotation ResponseStatus

I use this annotation like this;

@ResponseStatus(value = 401)
@ExceptionHandler(value = HttpMessageNotReadableException.class)
@ResponseBody
public ErrorResponse handleJsonMappingException(HttpMessageNotReadableException e) {

Is this helpfull?

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Unfortunately, this didn't seem to work: spring security ignores the @ResponseStatus(UNAUTHORIZED) and @ExceptionHandler(AccessDeniedException.class) annotations. Is there any additional configuration I need? –  Ricardo Gladwell Jul 12 '12 at 10:28
1  
Correction: using @ResponseStatus(UNAUTHORIZED) with @ExceptionHandler(AccessDeniedException.class) worked with Spring Security 3.1. –  Ricardo Gladwell Jul 12 '12 at 10:33
    
humh thought so, it is a spring 3.1 feature (I am using spring 3.1.x) –  Mark Bakker Jul 12 '12 at 10:45
    
Uh oh, just found out that the above solution doesn't add the WWW-Authenticate HTTP header to the 401 response so the client has no idea what realm to authenticate for and so, in my browser, doesn't prompt the user for credentials. –  Ricardo Gladwell Jul 12 '12 at 11:19
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To use @ResponseBody and manipulate the response header us the following:

@RequestMapping(value = "/url", method = RequestMethod.GET, headers = { "Accept=application/json" })
public @ResponseBody
List handle(HttpServletResponse response,
@RequestHeader("headerID") String headerString) {
response.setHeader("responseHeaderProperty", String);
return service.doSomething();
}
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That is an alternative, but seems like breaking DRY when Spring Security is already handling the HTTP headers for me. BTW you can probably edit your original answer and copy-and-paste the above into that! –  Ricardo Gladwell Jul 12 '12 at 12:49
    
well I could add this to a comment (it is to big), and well this part doesn't reflect to your original question. But glad to help :X –  Mark Bakker Jul 12 '12 at 12:57
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