Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone suggest how to re-write the following Java snippet and if so why it would be inappropriate, thanks !!

try {
    int i = 0;
    while (true)
        a[i++].func();
} catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
}
share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Ramesh PVK, RoToRa, Nathaniel Ford, Sheridan, S.L. Barth Mar 6 at 14:57

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
Ist this homework? –  RoToRa Jul 12 '12 at 9:14
1  
Do you understand what is that doing? If so, you have to know why it is inappropriate... –  Betlista Jul 12 '12 at 9:16
2  
This is covered in Item 42 of Java Puzzlers. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 12 '12 at 9:16

4 Answers 4

Use a for-each loop:

for(TypeOfArray item : a) {
    item.func();
}

Or alternatively a simple for loop:

for(int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
    a[i].func();
}

The resulting bytecode is more or less the same but I find for-each loops more elegant. Your code is inappropriate, because it:

  • uses Exceptions for flow control
  • uses a while(true) loop (simply don't use it if there is any other way)
share|improve this answer

As a good general principle, you should not use exceptions for flow control. And frankly, running off the end of an array is just being slack.

Try using a "foreach" loop:

for (IHasFunc hasFunc : a) {
    hasFunc.func();
}
share|improve this answer

Don't use an exception to end the loop. Use a.length to determine the size.

share|improve this answer

If you use a for loop thus:

for (YourObject obj : a) {
   obj.func();
}

then you avoid the requirement for an indexing variable.

As noted, exceptions aren't good for flow control. They're expensive to create and tracing their execution flow is difficult.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.