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I am using the toggle() method on buttons so that they can have a do something / revert changes behaviour. For instance:

$('button').toggle(function() {
  // case 1: maximize
  // ...
  another_function($(this));
  }, function() {
   // case 2: minimize
   // ...
  another_function($(this));
});

In both toggle cases, the same function is called at the end (another_function()). I would like from that function to find out whether we are in case 1 or in case 2 without having to manipulate the button myself (e.g add a class, set a custom attribute before calling the function, and check on those changes inside the function).

Is there a way to find out from the element state data itself in which toggle case we're in (surely jQuery must set a state somewhere to know which part of the toggle to execute)?

PS: there are many posts related to that topic already on SO but they're about hide/show cases and their suggestions (check if it's visible, hidden...) doesn't apply here.

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Instead of re-using another_function() for both the on/off state, why not have two separate functions? Obvious question, but I can't see a case for doing it this way... –  cchana Jul 12 '12 at 9:55
    
because another_function is used to update the button HTML (img and text), so the logic is the same in both cases, it's just the path to the image and the text function that change depending on the case, hence no need to call 2 separate functions. –  user359650 Jul 12 '12 at 10:03
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You already know what state you are in (maximize/minimize) because the code for that particular state is executing. So you could simply pass this information to another_function as an argument:

$('button').toggle(function() {
  // case 1: maximize
  // ...
  another_function($(this), 'maximize');
  }, function() {
   // case 2: minimize
   // ...
  another_function($(this), 'minimize');
});

Update: Grovelling jQuery's internal state

jQuery currently (1.7.2) uses a private back door into the .data() mechanism to store state for its toggles. This back door is explicitly marked private more than one in the jQuery source and it goes without saying that any part of what follows is subject to change without any notice. Therefore I strongly recommend not going down this path.

That said, here's what's going on:

jQuery uses a private data space accessed through $._data() to store the current click count for toggles. This click count modulo 2 is used to decide which function to execute and is incremented on each click.

The key used to store this data is currently the string "lastToggle" + guid, where guid is a value typically auto-generated by jQuery as well (using a global incrementing counter). The value of guid is set on the toggle handler functions and you can retrieve it after setting the toggle like this:

var f1 = function() {
  // case 1: maximize
  // ...
  another_function($(this), 'maximize');
},  f2 = function() {
  // case 2: minimize
  // ...
  another_function($(this), 'minimize');
};

$('button').toggle(f1, f2);

// guid is now available on both handlers:
console.log(f1.guid, f2.guid);

You can also fix the value of guid by setting it on the first handler before calling toggle:

var f1 = function() {
  // case 1: maximize
  // ...
  another_function($(this), 'maximize');
},  f2 = function() {
  // case 2: minimize
  // ...
  another_function($(this), 'minimize');
};

f1.guid = "foo";
$('button').toggle(f1, f2);

// guid is now fixed to "foo" and available on both handlers:
console.log(f1.guid, f2.guid);

Given this handle, you can retrieve the count of clicks so far (and thus predict which handler will be called next) with

$._data($('button'), "lastToggle" + guid);
share|improve this answer
    
I sure could (and that's what I'm doing right now), but I like to keep the number of arguments to the minimum, so if I could retrieve the case from the button state data I would prefer doing it. –  user359650 Jul 12 '12 at 9:57
1  
@user359650: I updated the answer with the information you are looking for, but what you are thinking about doing is a bad idea. Don't grovel jQuery's state -- use your own if you need to. –  Jon Jul 12 '12 at 10:20
    
True, I forgot that relying on jQuery's internals was a bad idea as updates to Jquery are more likely to break my code. –  user359650 Jul 12 '12 at 10:24
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