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Is it possible to assign multiple keys per value in a Python dictionary. One possible solution is to assign value to each key:

dict = {'k1':'v1', 'k2':'v1', 'k3':'v1', 'k4':'v2'}

but this is not memory efficient since my data file is > 2 GB. Otherwise you could make a dictionary of dictionary keys:

key_dic = {'k1':'k1', 'k2':'k1', 'k3':'k1', 'k4':'k4'}
dict = {'k1':'v1', 'k4':'v2'}
main_key = key_dict['k2']
value = dict[main_key]

This is also very time and effort consuming because I have to go through whole dictionary/file twice. Is there any other easy and inbuilt Python solution?

Note: my dictionary values are not simple string (as in the question 'v1', 'v2') rather complex objects (contains different other dictionary/list etc. and not possible to pickle them)

Note: the question seems similar as How can I use both a key and an index for the same dictionary value? But I am not looking for ordered/indexed dictionary and I am looking for other efficient solutions (if any) other then the two mentioned in this question.

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3  
You are unlikely to find a solution better than your first one. Just put multiple keys in the dictionary. Why is this not good enough? –  BrenBarn Jul 12 '12 at 9:52
    
As I said in question the file is very large so putting same values multiple time need lot of memory. –  d.putto Jul 12 '12 at 9:55
9  
Values in python are not necessarily duplicated in python, even if using multiple keys to refer to them. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 12 '12 at 9:56
    
The value won't use up extra memory unless you recreate it every time. See the answer from @Useless. –  BrenBarn Jul 12 '12 at 9:56
    
@MartijnPieters - oh I missed this point I think I should do more test now I remember i,j=0, 0; id(i)==id(j); True :) –  d.putto Jul 12 '12 at 9:58
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4 Answers

What type are the values?

dict = {'k1':MyClass(1), 'k2':MyClass(1)}

will give duplicate value objects, but

v1 = MyClass(1)
dict = {'k1':v1, 'k2':v1}

results in both keys referring to the same actual object.

In the original question, your values are strings: even though you're declaring the same string twice, I think they'll be interned to the same object in that case


NB. if you're not sure whether you've ended up with duplicates, you can find out like so:

if dict['k1'] is dict['k2']:
    print("good: k1 and k2 refer to the same instance")
else:
    print("bad: k1 and k2 refer to different instances")

(is check thanks to J.F.Sebastian, replacing id())

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dictionary values are not simple string rather complex object (contains different other dictionary/list etc.) –  d.putto Jul 12 '12 at 10:06
4  
you could use obj1 is obj2 to test object identity instead of id(obj1) == id(obj2) –  J.F. Sebastian Jul 12 '12 at 10:07
1  
@d.putto - in that case make sure you're storing the same instance with each key, not a duplicate instance with the same contents (as per my first two examples). If unsure, confirm with is –  Useless Jul 12 '12 at 10:08
1  
type doesn't matter. You shouldn't rely on how Python treats some immutable objects. If you need the same object; just provide it (as in v1 example) –  J.F. Sebastian Jul 12 '12 at 10:13
    
I agree you shouldn't, just wanted to check whether the OP was already getting automagical interning. Thanks for the is reminder btw. –  Useless Jul 12 '12 at 10:14
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Check out this - it's an implementation of exactly what you're asking: multi_key_dict(ionary)

https://pypi.python.org/pypi/multi_key_dict (sources at https://github.com/formiaczek/python_data_structures/tree/master/multi_key_dict)

Can use different types for keys but also keys of the same type. Also you can iterate over items using key types of your choice, e.g.:

m = multi_key_dict()
m['aa', 12] = 12
m['bb', 1] = 'cc and 1'
m['cc', 13] = 'something else'

print m['aa']   # will print '12'
print m[12]     # will also print '12'

# but also:
for key, value in m.iteritems(int):
    print key, ':', value
# will print:1
# 1 : cc and 1
# 12 : 12
# 13 : something else

# and iterating by string keys:
for key, value in m.iteritems(str):
    print key, ':', value
# will print:
# aa : 12
# cc : something else
# bb : cc and 1

m[12] = 20 # now update the value
print m[12]   # will print '20' (updated value)
print m['aa']   # will also print '20' (it maps to the same element)

There is no limit to number of keys, so code like:

m['a', 3, 5, 'bb', 33] = 'something' 

is valid, and either of keys can be used to refer to so-created value (either to read / write or delete it).

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What about the case when two keys contain the same element, say m['aa', 12] and m[12, 'bb']. What happens when you do m[12] = 20 –  1_CR Jun 6 '13 at 16:21
    
if two keys contain the same element (which is actually what this is trying to achieve) - this element can be accessed with either of those keys, and removal of either (e.g. del[12] or del['aa']) will remove the element and it won't be accessible by any other key (also references to this other key(s) are removed). –  formiaczek Jun 9 '13 at 15:30
    
m[12] = 20 will either: 1) if m doesn't contain element with this key (single or multiple) - it will create an element with key 12 and assign (map) it to the value 20 (like standard dictionary). 2) If element exists (like in example above) it will update the value referenced by this key. If this value was mapped with multiple keys - accessing it with these other keys will refer to this (updated) value. I have updated example above to reflect this. –  formiaczek Jun 9 '13 at 15:36
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You can build an auxiliary dictionary of objects that were already created from the parsed data. The key would be the parsed data, the value would be your constructed object -- say the string value should be converted to some specific object. This way you can control when to construct the new object:

existing = {}   # auxiliary dictionary for making the duplicates shared
result = {}
for k, v in parsed_data_generator():
    obj = existing.setdefault(v, MyClass(v))  # could be made more efficient
    result[k] = obj

Then all the result dictionary duplicate value objects will be represented by a single object of the MyClass class. After building the result, the existing auxiliary dictionary can be deleted.

Here the dict.setdefault() may be elegant and brief. But you should test later whether the more talkative solution is not more efficient -- see below. The reason is that MyClass(v) is always created (in the above example) and then thrown away if its duplicate exists:

existing = {}   # auxiliary dictionary for making the duplicates shared
result = {}
for k, v in parsed_data_generator():
    if v in existing:
        obj = existing[v]
    else:
        obj = MyClass(v)
        existing[v] = obj

    result[k] = obj

This technique can be used also when v is not converted to anything special. For example, if v is a string, both key and value in the auxiliary dictionary will be of the same value. However, the existence of the dictionary ensures that the object will be shared (which is not always ensured by Python).

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I'm surprised no one has mentioned using Tuples with dictionaries. This works just fine:

my_dictionary = {}
my_dictionary[('k1', 'k2', 'k3')] = 'v1'
my_dictionary[('k4')] = 'v2'
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