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In Firefox and Chrome the documentURI property of the document node object of an XML DOM will return the URI of the DOM if it is created using the XMLHTTPRequest object.

Is there an equivalent property for the Internet Explorer DOM, and if so what is it? The documentURI, url, URL and baseURI properties all return either null or undefined.

The MSXML documentation for the url property made me hope that this would return the URL used in the HTTP request that created the DOM - but the example given doesn't use XMLHTTPRequest.

The code I've used to create the DOM and then test the property is below:

function getXslDom(url) {
    if (typeof XMLHttpRequest == "undefined") {
        XMLHttpRequest = function () {
            return new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP.6.0");
        };
    }
    var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
    req.open("GET", url, false);
    req.send(null);
    var status = req.status;
    if (status == 200 || status == 0) {
        return req.responseXML;
    } else {
        throw "HTTP request for " + url + " failed with status code: " + status;
    }
};
var xslDom = getXslDom('help.xsl');
// the following shows "undefined" for IE
window.alert(xslDom.documentURI);
share|improve this question
    
The given example on MSDN didn't use XMLHttpRequest, but would it be an option to use the alternative method(DOMDocument->load)? –  Dr.Molle Jul 12 '12 at 13:17
    
@Dr.Molle Unfortunately this has to use XMLHttpRequest. This is for the JavaScript API of a browser-based XSLT 2.0 processor - so the DOM object is most likely to come from an AJAX-style request, but we don't actually have control over how the DOM is created - as this is on the other side of the interface. –  pgfearo Jul 12 '12 at 13:43
    
Have you tried .URLUnencoded? Sorry I don't have IE to test it for you. It's undefined in most browsers except IE. –  Adi Jul 14 '12 at 13:07
    
I've just tested it, didn't work with XMLHttpRequest –  Adi Jul 14 '12 at 13:24
    
@Adnan thanks for testing this, I hadn't tried it myself - hopefully its something similar - the documentation doesn't seem too clear –  pgfearo Jul 14 '12 at 14:16

1 Answer 1

Using the example from the MSXML page you linked I managed to get it to work:

<script>

  var getXslDom = function(url) {
    if(typeof ActiveXObject === 'function') {
      var xmlDoc = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.DOMDocument.3.0");
      xmlDoc.async = false;
      xmlDoc.load(url);
      if (xmlDoc.parseError.errorCode != 0) {
         var myErr = xmlDoc.parseError;
         throw "You have error " + myErr.reason;
      } else {
         return xmlDoc;
      }
    } else {
      var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
        req.open("GET", url, false);
        req.send(null);
        var status = req.status;
        if (status == 200 || status == 0) {
            return req.responseXML;
        } else {
            throw "HTTP request for " + url + " failed with status code: " + status;
        }
    }
  }

  var dom = getXslDom('help.xsl')
  alert(dom.documentURI || dom.url)

</script>

Here is a demo.

Cheers!

PS: I used "alert" only because the OP seems to use it, personally I prefer "console.log", which I also recommend to the OP.

share|improve this answer
    
What you're doing here is creating the DOM in another way (similar to that in the example I linked to) to show that in some circumstances dom.url can work. I'm hoping for a more universal solution because our code the retrieves the URI from the DOM is on the other side of an API - we can't control how the DOM is created. On console.log: Our finished solution exploits Log4J style logging with different LogHandlers and LogFormatters optimised for various browsers and plugins - 'alert()' was just to simplify things here –  pgfearo Jul 19 '12 at 16:02
    
Make sure the content type is text/xml. If you can not control the content type there is no way to make this work without parsing the XML manually for IE. –  Luuk van Egeraat Jul 19 '12 at 17:30
    
Yes, we can't control the content type from the HTTP request as it is on the other side of the API - but it is reasonable to assume that it will be text/xml. If IE doesn't provide a method to access the DOM URI in the case I outlined (looking increasingly likely) then this isn't consistent with other browsers which is unfortunate –  pgfearo Jul 21 '12 at 11:35

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