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I have an existing site built with CodeIgniter at example.com.

I have a WordPress install at example.com/wp. Urls look like this: example.com/wp/my-page

I'm trying to figure out how I can rewrite example.com/my-page to display the contents of the example.com/wp/my-page while still displaying the URL as example.com/my-page.

CodeIgniter controls the index.php file, so I can't use WordPress's index.php in the root.

I'm half way there, I have it working with a plain HTML file, but getting WordPress involved rewrites the url to the /wp subdirectory.

Here's what I'm using, in the example.com root:

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
Options FollowSymLinks

RewriteBase /

RewriteRule ^my-page /wp/my-page [P]

</IfModule>

When I visit example.com/my-page I end up at example/wp.

I imagine it has something to do with the standard WordPress .htaccess in the /wp/ directory which looks like this:

# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /wp/
RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /wp/index.php [L]
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

I've tried adding the [P] flag to the WordPress rules but no luck, I also tried not setting the rewrite base to /wp/.

The problem is I don't understand this stuff in enough detail to figure out my issue, or to know whether this is possible.

In summary, I think I'm trying to rewrite a rewritten URL without doing a redirect (hence the [P] flags).

Can this be done? Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Why P? You use mod_proxy? L flag stops rules execution –  poncha Jul 12 '12 at 11:01
    
My mistake. Doesn't seem to work as I want with L flag either, which is why I tried to use the mod_proxy option. –  Shaun Jul 12 '12 at 11:04
    
What exactly does not work when you use L on the rule RewriteRule ^my-page /wp/my-page [L] ? (without changing wordpress rules). –  poncha Jul 12 '12 at 11:05
    
I just tried this, and i see /my-page in uri, but the request really hits /wp/index.php , and it gets REQUEST_URI=/my-page and REDIRECT_URL]=/wp/my-page –  poncha Jul 12 '12 at 11:07
    
It gets redirected fully to mysite.com/wp/my-page, the URI in the address bar changes. –  Shaun Jul 12 '12 at 11:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$ cat .htaccess

RewriteEngine on
RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^my-page wp/my-page [L]

$ tree -a wp

wp
|-- .htaccess
`-- index.php

$ cat wp/.htaccess

# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /wp/
RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /wp/index.php [L]
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

$ cat wp/index.php

<pre><?php print_r($_SERVER); ?></pre>

Result:

URL visible in browser: http://example.com/my-page Output:

Array
(
[REDIRECT_REDIRECT_STATUS] => 200
[REDIRECT_STATUS] => 200
[HTTP_HOST] => example.com
[HTTP_USER_AGENT] => Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:13.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/13.0.1
[HTTP_ACCEPT] => text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
[HTTP_ACCEPT_LANGUAGE] => en-us,en;q=0.5
[HTTP_ACCEPT_ENCODING] => gzip, deflate
[HTTP_CONNECTION] => keep-alive
[PATH] => /usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin
[SERVER_SIGNATURE] => Apache/2.2.16 (Debian) Server at example.com Port 80
[SERVER_SOFTWARE] => Apache/2.2.16 (Debian)
[SERVER_NAME] => example.com
[SERVER_ADDR] => 1.2.3.4
[SERVER_PORT] => 80
[REMOTE_ADDR] => 4.3.2.1
[DOCUMENT_ROOT] => /www/vhosts/example.com/
[SERVER_ADMIN] => webmaster@example.com
[SCRIPT_FILENAME] => /www/vhosts/example.com/wp/index.php
[REMOTE_PORT] => 57775
[REDIRECT_URL] => /wp/my-page
[GATEWAY_INTERFACE] => CGI/1.1
[SERVER_PROTOCOL] => HTTP/1.1
[REQUEST_METHOD] => GET
[QUERY_STRING] => 
[REQUEST_URI] => /my-page
[SCRIPT_NAME] => /wp/index.php
[PHP_SELF] => /wp/index.php
[REQUEST_TIME] => 1342091732
)

So, if you're still seeing a redirect after this point, that is being done by wordpress php code

share|improve this answer
    
Yep. This is bang on. Thank you. –  Shaun Jul 12 '12 at 11:29

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