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I have a ViewController with some controllers and some views. Two of these views (Grid Cell) are other nibs. I've got outlets from the Grid Cells to File's Owner, but they aren't loaded automatically.

So I try to override GridCell.m's initWithCoder. This startes an infinite loop.

I know it's possible to just override initWithFrame and add the subview from code, but this is not what I want. I want to be able to move the view around in Interface Builder and have xcode initialize the view with the right frame.

How do I go about achieving this?

EDIT 1

I'm trying to get it working with the help of Alexander. This is how I've now got it set up: MainView has UIView with a Custom class set as GridCell. It got an outlet in the MainView/File's Owner. Pic 1

Removed all init-code from GridCell.m and set up an outlet to my custom class Pic 2 Pic 3

The MainView don't still display the GridCell though. There's no error, just a lonely, empty space where the red switch should be. What am I doing wrong?

I'm very close to just doing this programmatically. I would love to learn how to this with nibs though.

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[NSBundle loadNibNamed] returns a BOOL! –  trojanfoe Jul 12 '12 at 10:55
1  
Thanks for your reply. NSBundle loadNibNamed returnes an array which I get the first object of: Apple developer –  Jon Ramvi Jul 12 '12 at 10:57
1  
Ah good point - I was looking at the OS X reference :) –  trojanfoe Jul 12 '12 at 10:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Loading a nib will cause the corresponding owner in a

  -(id) initWithCoder:(NSCoder *) coder;  

call

Therefore your coude in this method:

self = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed: @"GridCell"
owner: self
options: nil] objectAtIndex:0];

will cause again a call of the initWithCoder method. That's because you try to load the nib again. If you define a custom UIView and create a nib file to lay out its subviews you can't just add a UIView to another nib file, change the class name in IB to your custom class and expect the nib loading system to figure it out. What you could do is the following:

Your custom view's nib file needs to have the 'File's owner' class set to your custom view class and you need to have an outlet in your custom class called 'toplevelSubView' connected to a view in your custom view nib file that is acting as a container for all the subviews. Add additional outlets to your view class and connect up the subviews to 'File's owner' (your custom UIView). (See http://stackoverflow.com/a/7589220/925622)

EDIT Okay, to answer your edited question I would do the following:

Go to the nib file where you want to include the custom view with it's nib file layouting it. Do not make it to the custom view (GridCell) itself, instead make a view which will contain your grid cell (gridCellContainer for example, but it should be a UIView) Customize the initWithFrame method within your custom view like you did in initWithCoder:

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {
        NSArray *nib = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"GridCell" owner:self options:nil];    
        self = [nib objectAtIndex:0];
        self.frame = frame;
    }
    return self;
}

And then, in the viewController which is the fileOwner for the view where you want to include your custom view (the one with the gridCellContainer view) do this in viewDidLoad e.g.

//...
GridCell *gridCell = [[GridCell alloc] initWithFrame:self.viewGridCellContainer.bounds];
[self.viewGridCellContainer addSubview:gridCell];

Now eveything should work as you expected

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. In your link, Robin seems to be loading a nib in initWithCoder as me; but this is what causes the infinite loop - how is this a problem for me but a solution for him? I'm updating my question with your solution as I'm still having some trouble. I can add pics and stuff there.. –  Jon Ramvi Jul 12 '12 at 12:04
    
Updated my question. If you have a minute, please take a look. –  Jon Ramvi Jul 12 '12 at 12:25
    
See my edits... –  Alexander Jul 12 '12 at 17:52

Loading the nib causes initWithCoder to be called again, so you only want to do so if the subclass currently doesn't have any subviews.

-(id)initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)aDecoder {
    self = [super initWithCoder:aDecoder];
    if (self) {
        if (self.subviews.count == 0) {
            UINib *nib = [UINib nibWithNibName:NSStringFromClass([self class]) bundle:nil];
            UIView *subview = [[nib instantiateWithOwner:self options:nil] objectAtIndex:0];
            subview.frame = self.bounds;
            [self addSubview:subview];
        }
    }
    return self;
}
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1  
This method is consistent with ARC -- and also the only answer that remembers to set subview.frame = self.bounds. –  tw airball Apr 28 '13 at 5:14
    
Thanks, this worked for me. –  Nikolay Spassov Sep 12 '13 at 17:31
    
This is brilliant –  Eugene Dec 5 '13 at 12:40
    
This is the right answer. –  user623396 May 28 at 13:28
    
This works, but it creates an extra UIView under your custom view. –  Jason Moore Jul 18 at 13:24

loadNibNamed:: will call initWithCoder:

Why don't you follow this pattern?

-(id)initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)coder
{

    if (self = [super initWithcoder:coder]) {

       // do stuff here ... 

    }

    return self;                 
}

Does [super initWithcoder:coder] do things that you want to avoid?

share|improve this answer

I had the same issue when I'm trying to override initWithsomething method, we need

-(id)initWithsomething:(Something *)something
{
    if (self = [super initWithsomething:something]) {
       // do stuff here ... 
    }

    return self; 
}

instead

-(id)initWithsomething:(Something *)something
{
    if (self = [super init]) {
       // do stuff here ... 
    }

    return self;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't really a question, but you're far off, so I wanted to help you out. super refers to the class you're extending: when the header file starts with MyCustomLabel : UILabel, super is the UIlabel. That's why, when you initialize your own object, you also need to initialize the super with [super init]. You should never use initWithsomething in MyCustomLabel AND call super's initWithsomething, because you're then overriding the super's method with your own, since it's the same name. That is, your method should not be called initWithCoder nor initWithFrame. Come up with something new –  Jon Ramvi Nov 14 '12 at 13:54

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