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My Existing class structure.

AbstractTradeBaseClass - > AbstractTradeClass -> ConcreteTradeClass.

Am using DataAnnotations and IDataErrorInfo to validate my Model in my WPF application. I have moved the IDataErrorInfo methods to the AbstractTradeBaseClass so that i can be used by all the classes that inherit from the base class.

This is done by reading the attributes dynamically using Linq.

AbstractTradeBaseClass.cs

 public abstract class TradeBaseModel<T> : INotifyPropertyChanged, IDataErrorInfo
{
    #region INotifyPropertyChanged Members

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public void OnPropertyChanged( string propertyName )
    {
        if ( PropertyChanged != null )
        {
            PropertyChanged( this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs( propertyName ) );
        }
    }

    #endregion

    # region Getter/Validator members for Annotations
    private static readonly Dictionary<string, Func<T, object>>
        propertyGetters = typeof( T ).GetProperties()
                          .Where( p => GetValidations( p ).Length != 0 )
                          .ToDictionary( p => p.Name, p => GetValueGetter( p ) );

    private static readonly Dictionary<string, ValidationAttribute[]> validators =
        typeof( T ).GetProperties()
        .Where( p => GetValidations( p ).Length != 0 )
        .ToDictionary( p => p.Name, p => GetValidations( p ) );

    private static ValidationAttribute[] GetValidations( PropertyInfo property )
    {
        return ( ValidationAttribute[] )property.GetCustomAttributes( typeof( ValidationAttribute ), true );
    }

    private static Func<T, object> GetValueGetter( PropertyInfo property )
    {
        var instance = Expression.Parameter( typeof( T ), "i" );
        var cast = Expression.TypeAs( Expression.Property( instance, property ), typeof( object ) );
        return ( Func<T, object> )Expression.Lambda( cast, instance ).Compile();
    }
    # endregion

    #region IDataErrorInfo Members

    public string Error
    {
        get
        {
            var errors = from i in validators
                         from v in i.Value
                         where !v.IsValid( propertyGetters[i.Key]( **( T )ModelToValidate()** ) )
                         select v.ErrorMessage;
            return string.Join( Environment.NewLine, errors.ToArray() );
        }
    }

    protected Dictionary<string, string> _errors = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    public IDictionary<string, string> Errors
    {
        get { return _errors; }
    }

    public string this[string columnName]
    {
        get
        {
            string errorMessage = string.Empty;
            this.Errors.Remove( columnName );

            //string errorMessage = string.Empty;
            //switch(columnName)
            //{
            //    case "Range":
            //        if ( Range > 15 )
            //        {
            //            errorMessage = "Out of Range, should be less than 15";
            //        }
            //        break;
            //}

            //return errorMessage;

            if ( propertyGetters.ContainsKey( columnName ) )
            {
                var value = propertyGetters[columnName]( **( T )ModelToValidate()** );
                var errors = validators[columnName].Where( v => !v.IsValid( value ) )
                    .Select( v => v.ErrorMessage ).ToArray();

                string error = string.Join( Environment.NewLine, errors );
                this.OnPropertyChanged( "Error" );

                if ( !string.IsNullOrEmpty( error ) )
                {
                    this.Errors.Add( columnName, error );
                }

                return error;
            }

            return string.Empty;

        }
    }

    public abstract object ModelToValidate(); -- ***Gets the child object here, overridden in the child class to return the child object, -- is there a better way to do this using Generics ??***

    #endregion
}

AbstractTradeClass

 public abstract class TradeClassBase<T> : TradeBaseModel<T>
{
    public string EmptyString
    {
        get { return string.Empty; }
    }
}

ConcreteTradeClass

public class CashFlowTrade : TradeClassBase<CashFlowTrade>
{
    private int range;
    [RangeAttribute(0,10, ErrorMessage="Out of Range, Range should be less than 15")]
    public int Range
    {
        get
        {
            return this.range;
        }
        set
        {
            if ( this.range != value )
            {
                this.range = value;
                this.OnPropertyChanged( "Range" );
            }
        }
    }

    public override object ModelToValidate()
    {
        return this;
    }

}

Is there a better way of doing this instead of using an abstract method and overriding it in the child class to pass the actual child class object and casting it to type T. Usage indicated in above code in BOLD.

If there is a way I can pass the child class object down to the base class, i can then use the actual child class object itself to perform the validation operations.


Updated Working Code Constraint T with class and use the type casting operator as below.

    public abstract class TradeBaseModel<T> : INotifyPropertyChanged, IDataErrorInfo
    where T : class

replace call to the abstract method with the type cast.

 if ( propertyGetters.ContainsKey( columnName ) )
            {
                var value = propertyGetters[columnName]( this as T );
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

yes... directly use this. Even in an abstract class you have access to this reference. The only place where you can't use it is in static methods.

EDIT:

To enforce type checking, you could add a constraint on T :

public abstract class TradeBaseModel<T> : INotifyPropertyChanged, IDataErrorInfo where T: TradeBaseModel<T>

EDIT 2:

To sum-up Kans' comments below, this is not enough : this conversion enables an implicit type conversion from T to base type while a conversion from base type to T is required. The only solution seems to be a cast into using T the as operator in the above code, and for this, T has to be a class (which is OK if constraint above is added).

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic KeK, you got me thinking in the right direction. I did try (this) but there was a type mismatch error, as T is of a derived type and this would refer to the base type, so VS did not like it too, so took a different approach this time. Constrained the base and derived classes to Where T : class and then type casted this using the as operator and this seems to work. So primarily whats different between (T)this and (this as T), the former gives an error that cannot be cast, but the later works, am guessing all this boils down to Covariance, contrvariance principles.. –  Kans Jul 12 '12 at 12:27
    
OK... I think I did not understand the full implication. Please see edited answer for a solution where you could avoid the as operator –  Kek Jul 12 '12 at 12:57
    
this does not work too, as T is a derived type as it is in the Dictionary - Func<T, object>, the conversion is not valid when doing a (T) of this, so still get a type mismatch when using this after constraining T to my base type... –  Kans Jul 12 '12 at 13:13
    
aaarrrg, yes you right, this constraint enables an implicit cast from T to base type, not from base type to T. (However, seeing your code, this constraint is valid anyway)... then I think you have the only possible solution : the as operator. –  Kek Jul 12 '12 at 13:24
    
Yeah, and this cast would not fail as its always going to be inherited from the base type, so am assuming there would not be an invalid cast any time, thanks a lot for your time and effort helping me get my head around this. :) –  Kans Jul 12 '12 at 14:09

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