Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
struct com
{ 
    unsigned short n,a;
    bool operator()(com const& c1,com const& c2) const
    {
        if(c1.a<c2.a)
             return 1;
        if(c1.a==c2.a)
            return c1.n>c2.n;
        return 0;
    } /*This is ascending sorting technique.*/
}o[128];

I need to build up a descending sorting technique like this.

If we want to sort o objects of class com in ascending order we can use upper function. But i need to sort it out as an descending order.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by mdm, Abyx, Park Young-Bae, Yochai Timmer, Bill the Lizard Jul 12 '12 at 12:24

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Ok, so what is your question? –  Omaha Jul 12 '12 at 11:34
    
Just revert the comparisons? –  Park Young-Bae Jul 12 '12 at 11:38
1  
I think user has a one code segment and h/she wants to convert this to descending version. –  user319824 Jul 12 '12 at 11:40
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/q/6218812/140719 –  sbi Jul 12 '12 at 11:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd suggest

#include <tuple>    

struct com
{ 
    unsigned short n,a;
    bool operator()(com const& c1,com const& c2) const
    {
        return std::tie(c1.a,c1.n) > std::tie(c2.a,c2.n);
    } 
};

Update Anyone wanting to know whether the std::tie (or boost::tie) approach is less/more efficient, see here: How to map a bool to a 3d point struct with std::map?

share|improve this answer

You're being terribly vague. But how about inverting the comparisons?

struct com
{ 
    unsigned short n, a;

    bool operator() (com c1,com c2)
    {
        if (c1.a > c2.a)  return 1;
        if (c1.a == c2.a) return c1.n < c2.n;

        return true;
    }
 };
share|improve this answer
    
could do with some formatting. Also return o; will probably not compile –  sehe Jul 12 '12 at 11:42
    
@sehe True... I had just c/c'ed OP's code. –  Park Young-Bae Jul 12 '12 at 11:50
3  
Now, when you do return false; perhaps doing return true; makes sense too :) –  sehe Jul 12 '12 at 11:53
    
@minitech If it works like that, i never asked it here. –  Sk Borhan Uddin Jul 17 '12 at 8:43
    
@Borhan: I'm not the one who answered. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jul 17 '12 at 14:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.