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Here is a little snippet of code:

class Foo[A] {
  def foo[B](param: SomeClass[B]) {
  //
  }
}

Now, inside foo, how do I:
1) verify if B is the same type as A?
2) verify if B is a subtype of A?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need implicit type evidences, <:< for subtype check and =:= for same type check. See the answers for this question.

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1  
Do I have to implement these implicits by myself in case A and B are classes defined by me? –  Sergey Weiss Jul 12 '12 at 12:00
2  
@Sergey No, just append an extra (implicit ev: B <:< A) argument list to the method. Or (implicit ev: B =:= A) for equality. –  ron Jul 12 '12 at 12:05

As a side note, generalized type constraints aren't actually necessary:

class Foo[A] {
  def foo_subParam[B <: A](param: SomeClass[B]) {...}
  def foo_supParam[B >: A](param: SomeClass[B]) {...}
  def foo_eqParam[B >: A <: A](param: SomeClass[B]) {...}
  def foo_subMyType[Dummy >: MyType <: A] {...}
  def foo_supMyType[Dummy >: A <: MyType] {...}
  def foo_eqMyType[Dummy1 >: MyType <: A, Dummy2 >: A <: MyType] {...}
}

In fact, I prefer this way, because it both slightly improves type inference and guarantees that no extraneous runtime data is used.

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1  
+1, have to admit the Dummy idea is rad! –  missingfaktor Jul 13 '12 at 6:03

1) verify if B is the same type as A?

class Foo[A] {
  def foo(param: SomeClass[A]) = ???
}

// or

class Foo[A] {
  def foo[B](param: SomeClass[B])(implicit ev: A =:= B) = ???
}

2) verify if B is a subtype of A?

class Foo[A] {
  def foo[B <: A](param: SomeClass[B]) = ???
}

// or

class Foo[A] {
  def foo[B](param: SomeClass[B])(implicit ev: B <:< A) = ???
}

In your case, you do not need generalized type constraints (i.e. =:=, <:<). They're required when you need to add a constraint on the type parameter that is defined elsewhere, not on the method.

e.g. To ensure A is a String:

class Foo[A] {
  def regularMethod = ???
  def stringSpecificMethod(implicit ev: A =:= String) = ???
}

Here you cannot enforce the type constraint without a generalized type constraint.

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