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I'm trying the understand local cache with ETags and a nginx (1.2.1) server which redirects php's request to a php-cgi deamon.

Here my simple index.php :

<?php
header('Cache-Control: public');
header('Etag:"5954c6-10f4-449d11713aac0"');

echo microtime(true);

After a second request, my browser send a If-None-Match header :

Accept:text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
Accept-Charset:ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.3
Accept-Encoding:gzip,deflate,sdch
Accept-Language:fr-FR,fr;q=0.8,en-US;q=0.6,en;q=0.4
Cache-Control:max-age=0
Connection:keep-alive
Host:cache.loc
If-None-Match:"5954c6-10f4-449d11713aac0"

But my web server doesn't returns a 304 :

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Server: nginx/1.2.2
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 11:46:03 GMT
Content-Type: text/html
Transfer-Encoding: chunked
Connection: keep-alive
X-Powered-By: PHP/5.3.12
Cache-Control: public
Etag: "5954c6-10f4-449d11713aac0"
Cache-Control: public

Unless I've misunderstood, my server should compare Etag with the If-None-Match sent and returns a 304 response because they're the same.

Where am I wrong ? Should I compare Etag with If-None-Match in my PHP script because nginx (or Apache) will not do the job itself ?

Regards, Manu

share|improve this question
    
Some PHP code, ETAG compatible gist.github.com/2313388 –  hakre Jul 12 '12 at 12:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you implement this yourself using php, you are responsible for also sending the 304 Not Modified.

So compare the If-None-Match header with your ETag, and use header() to send back the 304.

share|improve this answer
    
Or probably you can hack nginx as well to do that for you. –  hakre Jul 12 '12 at 12:01
1  
The problem is that nginx doesn't 'know' the current ETag, so nginx would still have to perform the actual PHP request first to find out what the ETag header was. This sounds like a bad idea. –  Evert Jul 12 '12 at 12:04
    
Sure, but nginx can then process the response headers before returning those to the client. Postprocessing. –  hakre Jul 12 '12 at 12:06
1  
@hakre According to RFC it can't, because nginx isn't an original server. –  VBart Jul 12 '12 at 14:17

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