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I've started using C# Expression constructs, and I've got a question about how generics are applied in the following situation:

Consider I have a type MyObject which is a base class for many different types. Inside this class I have the following code:

// This is a String Indexer Expression, used to define the string indexer when the object is in a collection of MyObjects
public Expression<Func<MyObject, string, bool>> StringIndexExpression { get; private set;}


// I use this method in Set StringIndexExpression and T is a subtype of MyObject
protected void DefineStringIndexer<T>(Expression<T, string, bool>> expresson) where T : MyObject
{
    StringIndexExpression = expression;
}

This is how I use DefineStringIndexer:

public class MyBusinessObject : MyObject
{

   public string Name { get; set; }

   public MyBusinessObject() 
   {
       Name = "Test";
       DefineStringIndexer<MyBusinessObject>((item, value) => item.Name == value);
   }

}

However in the assignment inside DefineStringIndexer I get the compile error:

Cannot implicitly convert type System.Linq.Expression.Expression< MyObject, string, bool > to System.Linq.Expression.Expression < MyBusinessObject, string, bool >>

Can I use Generics with C# Expressions in this situation? I want to use T in DefineStringIndexer so I can avoid casting MyObject inside the lambda.

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1  
Your code won't work because .NET doesn't support covariance between mutable types. You could use a immutable type (but that probably wouldn't work for you!). You could try DefineStringIndexer<MyObject>((item , value) => ((MyBusinessObject)item).Name == value);.. that might work! –  Charleh Jul 12 '12 at 12:57
1  
Alternatively you could make MyObject generic too and use MyBusinessObject : MyObject<MyBusinessObject> then make the type parameter for the Expression of type T –  Charleh Jul 12 '12 at 13:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The assignment will not work, because the Func<MyBusinessObject,string,bool> type is not assignment-compatible with Func<MyObject,string,bool>. However, the parameters of the two functors are compatible, so you can add a wrapper to make it work:

protected void DefineStringIndexer<T>(Func<T,string,bool> expresson) where T : MyObject {
    StringIndexExpression = (t,s) => expression(t, s);
}
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Good tip :) didn't think of that! –  Charleh Jul 12 '12 at 13:09

Would this work better for you?

Edit: Added <T> to constraint - think you will need that :)

class MyObject<T>
{
    // This is a String Indexer Expression, used to define the string indexer when the object is in a collection of MyObjects 
    public Expression<Func<T, string, bool>> StringIndexExpression { get; private set;} 


    // I use this method in Set StringIndexExpression and T is a subtype of MyObject 
    protected void DefineStringIndexer<T>(Expression<T, string, bool>> expresson) 
        where T : MyObject<T> // Think you need this constraint to also have the generic param
    { 
        StringIndexExpression = expression; 
    } 
}

then:

public class MyBusinessObject : MyObject<MyBusinessObject>
{ 

   public string Name { get; set; } 

   public MyBusinessObject()  
   { 
       Name = "Test"; 
       DefineStringIndexer<MyBusinessObject>((item, value) => item.Name == value); 
   } 

} 
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