Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following class hierarchy.

public abstract class ResourceBase { }

public abstract class WebResourceBase : ResourceBase  {
  public ResourceBase LocalPath { get; set; }
  public ResourceBase FtpPath { get; set; }
}

public class JavaScript : WebResourceBase { }

What I would like to do is have a declaration like so.

new JavaScript() {
  LocalPath = "/path/goes/here/1.js",
  FtpPath = "ftp://path/goes/here/1.js"
}

The obvious answer here would be to use implicit operators but the problem is that I want to assign a derived type to those properties which is the same as the declared type so LocalPath and FtpPath would be of type JavaScript.

I'd like my solution to be more flexible than what I have at the moment. This code just makes my skin crawl. Was hoping there was a way using reflection and I have tried looking for information using the StackTrace class but no luck. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

public abstract class ResourceBase { 
  public static implicit operator ResourceBase(string path) {
            if (path.EndsWith(".js"))
                return new JavaScript(path);
            // etc...
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Does WebResourceBase should be derived from ResourceBase? –  eyossi Jul 12 '12 at 13:32
    
i would implement an explicit function to map this rather than use implicit operators. this will make maintaining and understanding the code more difficult over the life of the project. –  Jason Meckley Jul 12 '12 at 13:33
    
@Vince Sorry, I see the problem now. I'll amend my answer. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 12 '12 at 13:36
    
If the base class declared an abstract method that took in a string (path) and returned a ResourceBase, then the JavaScript class could implement that method by returning new JavaScript(path);, and so on. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 12 '12 at 13:40
    
Or maybe you should simply let your JavaScript class (and other derived classes) have a constructor that takes two string arguments. Then you could do the stuff in the constructor. You don't have to use "object initializers"? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 12 '12 at 13:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This assumes that WebResourceBase is actually meant to inherit ResourceBase.

You won't be able to make the implicit operator look much nicer, unfortunately - generics won't work here.


Alternative: Generics to constrain ResourceBase

Now that I've re-read it and understand what you're after, one option is to amend your classes to include a generic parameter referencing derived classes (sort of like a self-reference):

public abstract class ResourceBase 
{ }

public abstract class WebResourceBase<T> : ResourceBase
    where T : WebResourceBase<T>
{
    public T LocalPath { get; set; }
    public T FtpPath { get; set; }
}

public class JavaScript : WebResourceBase<JavaScript> 
{ 
}

Then you will see that in JavaScript, the properties LocalPath and FtpPath are now of type JavaScript also.

Now your assignment will only accept JavaScript types:

new JavaScript() 
{
    LocalPath = new JavaScript("/path/goes/here/1.js"),
    FtpPath = new JavaScript("ftp://path/goes/here/1.js")
}

The benefit of this approach is it will constrain the base properties to be of the current type or more derived, not less derived.


Alternative: Explicit parsing instead of implicit operator

If you need to leave the LocalPath and FtpPath variables as ResourceBase, or otherwise cannot use generics here, your implicit operator will start to get confusing. Better to provide something explicit like a static method:

new JavaScript() 
{
    LocalPath = JavaScript.Parse("/path/goes/here/1.js"),
    FtpPath = JavaScript.Parse("ftp://path/goes/here/1.js")
}

class JavaScript
{
    public static ResourceBase Parse(string s)
    {
        if (path.EndsWith(".js"))
            return new JavaScript(path);

        throw new Exception();
    }
}


Alternative: Class hierarchy parsing instead of implicit operator

Bake the concept of consuming strings into the types via constructors and make the properties public read-only:

public abstract class ResourceBase
{ }

public abstract class WebResourceBase
{
    public ResourceBase LocalPath { get; private set; }
    public ResourceBase FtpPath { get; private set; }

    protected abstract ResourceBase ParseLocalPath(string s);
    protected abstract ResourceBase ParseFtpPath(string s);
}

public class JavaScript : WebResourceBase<JavaScript> 
{ 
    protected override ResourceBase ParseLocalPath(string s)
    {
        // etc.
    } 
    protected override ResourceBase ParseFtpPath(string s)
    {
        // etc.
    } 
}


To be honest, most of this seems a little overkill just to get two properties set as a particular type from a string, you have loads of options - even the implicit operator will work.

Pick the one that is easiest to understand. Operator overloading tends to be somewhat hidden unless you go digging for it.

share|improve this answer

I too assume that WebResourceBase is supposed to inherit from ResourceBase

Have a protected mapping mechanism on the base class that derived classes can subscribe themselves to:

public abstract class ResourceBase
{
    // Records how to make a ResourceBase from a string, 
    // on a per-extension basis
    private static Dictionary<string, Func<string, ResourceBase>> constructorMap
        = new Dictionary<string, Func<string, ResourceBase>>();

    // Allows a derived type to subscribe itself
    protected static void Subscribe(
        string extension, 
        Func<string, ResourceBase> ctor)
    {
        if (constructorMap.ContainsKey(extension))
            throw new Exception("nuh uh");

        constructorMap.Add(extension, ctor);
    }

    // Given a string, finds out who has signed up to deal with it,
    // and has them deal with it
    public static implicit operator ResourceBase(string s)
    {
        // Find a matching extension
        var matches = constructorMap.Where(kvp => s.EndsWith(kvp.Key)).ToList();

        switch (matches.Count)
        {
            case 0:
                throw new Exception(
                  string.Format("Don't know how to make {0} into a ResourceBase",
                                s));
            case 1:
                return matches.Single().Value(s);
            default:
                throw new Exception(string.Format(
                  "More than one possibility for making {0} into a ResourceBase",
                  s));
        }
    }
}

The intermediate type is largely unchanged, but with some type checking that I can't work out how to enforce at compile time:

public abstract class WebResourceBase : ResourceBase
{
    private ResourceBase localPath;
    public ResourceBase LocalPath
    {
        get { return localPath; }
        set
        {
            if (value.GetType() != GetType())
            {
                throw new Exception("Naughty");
            }
            localPath = value;
        }
    }        

    private ResourceBase ftpPath;
    public ResourceBase FtpPath
    {
        get { return ftpPath; }
        set
        {
            if (value.GetType() != GetType())
            {
                throw new Exception("Naughty");
            }
            ftpPath = value;
        }
    }
}

The concrete types look like this:

public class JavaScript : WebResourceBase
{
    public JavaScript()
    {

    }
    private JavaScript(string s)
    {
    }

    static JavaScript()
    {
        Subscribe("js", s => (ResourceBase)new JavaScript(s));
    }
}

Usage is as you specified:

        var js = new JavaScript
        {
            LocalPath = "hello.js",
            FtpPath = "hello.js"
        };

Note that despite the ResourceBase in the signature of constructorMap and Subscribe, after the above statement LocalPath and FtpPath are JavaScript objects.

share|improve this answer

I would just add an extra layer of indirection to the process (it's amazing how often that's a good answer for design questions ;) ).

I would either add a new constructor that takes two string parameters, add two additional string properties, or both. (I'll assume you're just adding two new string properties from here on; you can extrapolate from there.)

If you add a new property: JavaScriptLocalPath it can, in it's set method, convert the string into a derived type of ResourceBase specific to JavaScript and the set the LocationPath property using that result. I assume it's get method can also extract that string out of the ResourceBase (so that you don't need to bother storing the string as well).

share|improve this answer

Here's my idea:

public abstract class WebResourceBase {
  public ResourceBase LocalPath { get; set; }
  public ResourceBase FtpPath { get; set; }

  protected abstract ResourceBase ConvertFromString(string path);
  public string LocalPathStr { set { LocalPath = ConvertFromString(value); } }
  public string FtpPathStr { set { FtpPath = ConvertFromString(value); } }
}

Could probably be improved.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.