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I am trying to create a text file of the path and file name of everything within a certian directory. After looking around, it looks like the best way to do this is with the GLOB function and I was able to write a code that got me a list of the paths to every file:

import glob
dirlist = glob.glob('P:\MyDep\Myunit\MySection\Stuff\Reports\YR*\O*\*\*\*\*.pdf')
Bureau\Traffic\Reports\YR*\R*\*\*.pdf')
fo=open('new.txt', "w")
fo.write('\n'.join(dirlist))
fo.close()

However, I found myself using excell's MID statment to extract values from the report. Ideally, I would like the basename of the file inclued with the path as a tuple. I've come up with the the following:

for f in glob.glob('P:\MyDep\Myunit\MySection\Stuff\Reports\YR*\O*\*\*\*\*.pdf'):
        fpath, fname = os.path.split(f)
        rname, extname = os.path.splitext(fname)
        dirtup = (f, rname)
        print dirtup

But I cannot seem to write the results to a text file: the best I can seem to do is generate a text file with one listing from dirtup (edited to show code w/sugestions):

import glob, os
for f in f in glob.glob('P:\MyDep\Myunit\Mysection\Stuff\Reports\YR*\O*\*\*\*\*.pdf'):
    fpath, fname = os.path.split(f)
    rname, extname = os.path.splitext(fname)
    dirtup = (f, rname)
    fo=open('axlspd.txt', "w")
    fo.write(', '.join(dirtup)+'\n')
    fo.close()

How can I get the all the results of dirtup into a text file? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
The other post you're referring to does NOT relate to your problem. It dealt with command line issues, whereas you only have a problem that is within your Python code. –  Michael Schlottke Jul 12 '12 at 13:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you open the file multiple times. With the 'w' flag, the file is truncated each time it is opened, and you would only see the last write.

Open the file before the loop, and close it after, or use the new-fangled with statement:

import glob, os
with open('axlspd.txt', "w") as axlspd:
    for f in f in glob.glob('P:\MyDep\Myunit\Mysection\Stuff\Reports\YR*\O*\*\*\*\*.pdf'):
        fpath, fname = os.path.split(f)
        rname, extname = os.path.splitext(fname)
        dirtup = (f, rname)
        axlspd.write(', '.join(dirtup)+'\n')

The file is automatically closed when you exit that block of code.


This is the reference you missed: http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#open

The most commonly-used values of mode are 'r' for reading, 'w' for writing (truncating the file if it already exists)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that did it! It took me a minute to realize that I needed to enable the with statment since I am currently using Python 2.5 but once I did everything ran smoothly. –  mburkenysdot Jul 12 '12 at 17:27

I think os.walk is better for this:

import os
for root,dirs,files in os.walk('.'):
   #                            ^ Name of directory where you start your file search
   for f in files:
       print root,os.path.join(root,f)  #writes it as path path/filename

It looks like you only want files which end in '.pdf' so to do that, we can filter the filenames first -- and putting it in a text file is easy too:

import os
with open('filelist.txt','w') as outfile:
    for root,dirs,files in os.walk('.'):
       pdfs = [f for f in files if f.endswith('.pdf')]
       for f in pdfs:
           outfile.write('%s %s\n'%(root,os.path.join(root,f)))  #writes it as path path/filename
           #New style formatting:
           #outfile.write('{0} {1}\n'.format(root,os.path.join(root,f)))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for following up with me in @Daren Thomas's comment. I should have been more specifc in my orginal thread and stated why I was using GLOB in that I was only intrested in certain subdirectories that followed a certian pattern, however, now that I have figured out why "with" wasn't working for me (using 2.5) I will try your solution as well. –  mburkenysdot Jul 12 '12 at 17:25

I don't see your problem:

>>> import glob
>>> for f in glob.glob(r'c:\*.dll'):
...     print f
...
c:\install.res.1028.dll
c:\install.res.1031.dll
c:\install.res.1033.dll
c:\install.res.1036.dll
c:\install.res.1040.dll
c:\install.res.1041.dll
c:\install.res.1042.dll
c:\install.res.2052.dll
c:\install.res.3082.dll
c:\msdia80.dll
>>> import os
>>> for f in glob.glob(r'c:\*.dll'):
...    fpath, fname = os.path.split(f)
...    rname, extname = os.path.splitext(fname)
...    dirtup = (f, rname)
...    print dirtup
...
('c:\\install.res.1028.dll', 'install.res.1028')
('c:\\install.res.1031.dll', 'install.res.1031')
('c:\\install.res.1033.dll', 'install.res.1033')
('c:\\install.res.1036.dll', 'install.res.1036')
('c:\\install.res.1040.dll', 'install.res.1040')
('c:\\install.res.1041.dll', 'install.res.1041')
('c:\\install.res.1042.dll', 'install.res.1042')
('c:\\install.res.2052.dll', 'install.res.2052')
('c:\\install.res.3082.dll', 'install.res.3082')
('c:\\msdia80.dll', 'msdia80')
>>>

Unless you are having trouble with writing the tuple to the file. Try this:

# inside for loop
fo.write(', '.join(dirtup))
share|improve this answer
    
You probably want a newline in your fo.write(...) (although it is a little unclear what the format of the output file should be). –  mgilson Jul 12 '12 at 14:24
    
@mgilson, quite right! thanks! –  Daren Thomas Jul 12 '12 at 14:26
    
@user1520806 -- try: fo.write(', '.join(dirtup)+'\n'). You should be getting multiple results written, They just aren't each put on a new line. –  mgilson Jul 12 '12 at 15:32
    
@Mglison: I've been trying to post the code I used that is only returing the first result but have been running into formatting errors so I appolgize if my comments have been acting weird. Can I follow the syntax of my first example or is that were my issues are coming from? –  mburkenysdot Jul 12 '12 at 15:39

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