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If I have a method like this:

public void Show()
{
   Form1 f = new Form1();
   f.ShowDialog();
}

Do I still need to call dispose on the form even though it will go out of scope, which will be eligible for garbage collection.

From some testing, calling this Show() multiple times .. at some point it seems like the GC collects it since I can see the memory spiking then it goes down at some point in time.

From MSDN it seems to say you MUST call dispose when the form is not needed anymore.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your specific example, no, it's unlikely that it would be particularly useful. Forms do not hold onto a significant amount of resources, so if it takes a little bit longer for some portion of it's code to get cleaned up it isn't going to cause a problem. If that form just happens to be holding onto a control that is used to, say, play a video, then maybe it's actually holding onto some significant number of resources, and if you actually do dispose of those resources in the dispose method then it's worth taking the time to call dispose. For 99% of your forms though, their Dispose method will be empty, and whether you call it or not is unlikely to have any (or any noticeable) effect on your program.

The reason that it's there is primarily to enable the ability to dispose of resources in those 1% of cases where it's important.

It's also worth noting that when a Form is closed its Dispose method is already being called. You would only ever need to add a using or explicit Dispose call if you want to dispose of a Forms resources before that form is closed. (That sounds like a generally bad idea to me). This is easy enough to test. Just create a project with two forms. Have the second form attach an event handler to the Disposing event and show a message box or something. Then when you create an instance of that form and show it (as a dialog or not) you'll see that when you close it the message box will pop up right away, even if you keep the 'Form' instance around and without you ever needing to add a using or Dispose call.

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Thanks exactly what I was looking for as anwswer –  pdiddy Jul 12 '12 at 15:13
    
@pdiddy Until someone comes along and places something in Form1 that needs disposing, but because no one is calling it never gets disposed deterministically. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 12 '12 at 15:15
    
@AdamHouldsworth And yet the vast majority of forms are only ever instantiated once, ever, so it's not exactly a big chore to track that one place down and add a dispose call. It's also worth noting that many forms aren't shown via a dialog, and when it's not you can't just wrap it in a using and be done with it. Determining when to dispose of it is much harder. –  Servy Jul 12 '12 at 15:17
    
@Servy That assumes they are instantiated directly and not by some other means such as reflection. I agree that most of the time there is no functional difference, but as an act of getting into the habit, it is worth using using anyway - it's not exactly like there is a worthwhile performance benefit of not using using if there is only the one call. And it also assumes that a person amending the Dispose method will take it upon themselves to check it is disposed everywhere and not assume it is because of the accepted convention of IDisposable. I wouldn't check by default. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 12 '12 at 15:19
    
@AdamHouldsworth If you're not showing it as a dialog sure there is, since you won't be able to use a using at all in that case. You'll need more complex logic to actually dispose of it whenever it will no longer be used (which isn't always easy to determine). As for conventions; out of the code that I look through involving forms, I virtually never see anyone disposing of forms. If I made a form that relied on being disposed I would take the time to ensure it was actually being disposed because I know most people don't dispose of them. It's the same as for DataTables. –  Servy Jul 12 '12 at 15:20

What tends to happen is if the item has purely managed resources, calling dispose is not necessarily required, but is strongly advised because it makes disposal deterministic. It isn't always required (in a technical sense) because those managed resources would likely themselves now be eligible for GC, or there is actually nothing to dispose by default and it's an extensibility point.

For unmanaged resources, the Dispose Pattern advises implementing a finalizer, which will be called on GC. If types do not implement the finalizer and dispose is not called, then it is possible (well, very likely) that resources would be left unhandled. Finalizers are the last chance offered by the runtime for clearing your stuff up - they are also time-limited.

Note, that it does not make GC or managed memory reclamation deterministic, disposal is not delete from C++. A disposed item could be a long way away from actually being collected. However, in the managed world, you don't care about deterministic collection, only resource management - in other words, disposal.

That said, I always make sure I call Dispose or use a using statement if a type is disposable, regardless of whether it uses managed or unmanaged resources - it is the expected convention:

public void Show()
{
    using (var f = new Form1())
    {
        f.ShowDialog();
    } // Disposal, even on exceptions or nested return statements, occurs here.
}

Update:

After a discussion with Servy I feel I have to express this point as the reasoning behind my advice of disposing where possible. In the case of MemoryStream, it is clearly a disposable type, but actually does not dispose of anything currently.

Relying on this, however, is to rely on the implementation of MemoryStream. Were this to change to include an unmanaged resource, this would then mean that a reliance on MemoryStream not having anything to dispose becomes problematic.

Where possible (as is the case with IDisposable) I prefer to rely on the public contract. Working against the contract in this instance would mean I am safe from underlying implementation changes.

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The only cases I can think of in which production-quality code should not call Dispose on an object are those in which either (1) keeping track of the object's lifetime would be particularly onerous, and the object is known to be of a particular type which will clean itself up adequately even when not disposed; and/or (2) the object has a somewhat broken design which uses its Dispose method purely to unconditionally clean up a passed-in object (e.g. StreamReader), and the supplier of that passed-in object wishes to retain ownership. –  supercat Jul 13 '12 at 15:54
    
@supercat I can agree. I used to have a situation where the life-cycle was out of my control. I am just making the point that by default I try to dispose of everything. Of course, with all generalisations, there are exceptions. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 13 '12 at 15:57
    
may I ask: would it be different if the form would not be assigned to a pointer? Like new Form().ShowDialog() ? Or would it be even worse, since if I'm not keeping a pointer I'm not able to dispose it? (The Form in particular is only needed to calculate and display additional information on demand) –  skofgar Apr 5 '13 at 15:10
1  
@skofgar If you don't hold on to the reference the Application.OpenForms property will do. When all references are dropped, the GC will eventually dispose of it via the finalizer if it's implemented. In the case of a Form, not keeping hold of the reference isn't too big a deal. –  Adam Houldsworth Apr 8 '13 at 14:33

Although you rarely have to manually dispose in C# imo, you could try it like this:

    public void Show()
    {
       using (Form1 f = new Form1())
       {
         f.ShowDialog();
       }
    }

Then at the last accolade of the using part it will get disposed of automatically.

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You could simply do:

using (var f = new Form1())
   f.ShowDialog();
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If you want to explicitly dispose, use

 using(Form1 f = new Form1()){

            f.ShowDialog();
        }

This ensures Dispose() is called, as well as it occurs immediately

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