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How can I horizontally center a div within a div using CSS (if it's even possible)?

The outer div has width:100%:

<div id="outer" style="width:100%">  
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>

share|improve this question
3  
I maintain two operational examples (image and text) in a blog post: technotes.tostaky.biz/2013/04/… – JVerstry Apr 1 '13 at 19:33
1  
Easy with flexbox: stackoverflow.com/a/33049198/3597276 – Michael_B Dec 23 '15 at 23:36
    
I used to think that HTML5 elements were useless until I realised I kept creating endless nested div elements, HTML5 tags truly are helpful people please try NOT to get caught in the "div soup". – Mango Apr 2 at 18:30
    
I am the 670'th person to star and the 2255'th person to upvote, I really like odd numbers. – Mango Apr 2 at 18:36
    
I like to use HowToCenterInCSS.com – Joseph Dykstra Apr 12 at 15:31

50 Answers 50

up vote 2805 down vote accepted

You can apply this CSS to the inner div:

#inner {
    width: 50%;
    margin: 0 auto; 
}

Of course, you don't have to set the width to 50%. Any width less than the containing div will work. The margin: 0 auto is what does the actual centering.

If you are targeting IE8+, it might be better to have this instead:

#inner {
    display: table;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

It will make the inner element center horizontally and it works without setting a specific width.

share|improve this answer
8  
great, I have been looking for some new way of aligning the div to center (didn't want to use the obsolete technique i.e. align="center"). Thanks for this great information. :-) – Gaurav Sharma Jun 11 '10 at 6:24
4  
For the vertical centering I usually use "line-height" (line-height == height). This is simple and nice but it's only working with a one line content text :) – Nicolas Guillaume Jun 23 '10 at 12:36
32  
You have to use the !DOCTYPE tag on your html page to make it work well on IE. – Fabio Gouw Jan 28 '12 at 14:23
1  
Note that it may be necessary to add "float:none;" for the #inner. – Mert Mertce Sep 27 '13 at 8:30
2  
You also set the top and bottom margins to 0, which is unrelated. Better putting margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto I think. – Emmanuel Touzery Feb 8 '14 at 22:45

If you don't want to set a fixed width on the inner div you could do something like this:

#outer {
  width: 100%;
  text-align: center;
}

#inner {
  display: inline-block;
}

That makes the inner div into an inline element that can be centered with text-align.

share|improve this answer
5  
@SabaAhang the correct syntax for that would be float: none; and is probably only needed because #inner has inherited a float of either left or right from somewhere else in your CSS. – Doug McLean Nov 12 '15 at 9:21
1  
Funny how I sometimes ask myself the same question and again the same answer helped me out. – CularBytes Apr 16 at 17:38

Suppose that your div is 200px wide:

.centered {
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;
  margin-left: -100px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work in Safari – cesards Aug 8 '15 at 9:05
    
I don't like this solution because when the inner element is too broad for the screen, you can't scroll over the whole element horizontally. margin: 0 auto works better. – Aloso Dec 30 '15 at 4:02

Best approaches with CSS 3

box model:

#outer{
    width:100%;

    /* Firefox */
    display:-moz-box;
    -moz-box-pack:center;
    -moz-box-align:center;

    /* Safari and Chrome */
    display:-webkit-box;
    -webkit-box-pack:center;
    -webkit-box-align:center;

    /* W3C */
    display:box;
    box-pack:center;
    box-align:center;
}
#inner{
    width:50%;
}

According to your usability you may also use the box-orient, box-flex, box-direction properties.

flex :

#outer {
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: row;
    flex-wrap: wrap;
    justify-content: center;
    align-items: center;
}

Here is a playground for centering elements with box model.

Read more about centering the child elements

And this explains why box model is best approach.

share|improve this answer
    
it also works for me when inner div have float: left; – Tareq Nov 12 '12 at 6:30
15  
Make sure you read this answer first before you go about implementing this solution. – cimmanon Apr 24 '13 at 18:51
    
Safari, as of now, still requires -webkit flags for flexbox (display: -webkit-flex; and -webkit-align-items: center; and -webkit-justify-content: center;) – Joseph Jul 23 '15 at 15:59

I've created this example to show how to vertically and horizontally align.

Code is basically this:

#outer {
  position: relative;
}

and...

#inner {
  margin: auto;  
  position: absolute;
  left:0;
  right: 0;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
} 

and it will stay in the center even when you re-size your screen

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
8  
+1 for this method, I was about to answer with it. Note that you must declare a width on the element you wish to center horizontally (or height if centering vertically). Here's a comprehensive explanation: codepen.io/shshaw/full/gEiDt. One of the more versatile and widely-supported methods of centering elements vertically and/or horizontally. – stvnrynlds Dec 16 '13 at 18:27
3  
You cannot use padding within the div, but if you want to give the illusion use a border of the same color. – Squirrl Jul 9 '14 at 11:45
    
I think for this method to work, you need to set the with and height of inner div – Nicolas S.Xu Nov 29 '15 at 21:39

If you don't want to set a fixed width and don't want the extra margin, add display: inline-block to your element.

You can use:

#element {
    display: table;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
same requirements as display:inline-block too (quirksmode.org/css/display.html) – montrealmike Sep 11 '12 at 15:09
    
I use this approach. Side note, I had an input type of submit within the centered div and this caused it to switch back to 100% wide. I ended up just moving the submit button to its own div. – seePatCode Feb 14 '13 at 19:44

Some posters have mentioned the css3 way to center using display:box

This syntax is outdated and shouldn't be used anymore.[See also this post] So just for completeness here is the latest way to center in css3 using the Flexible Box Layout Module

So if you have simple markup like:

<div class="box">
  <div class="item1">A</div>
  <div class="item2">B</div>
  <div class="item3">C</div>
</div>

...and you want to center your items within the box, here's what you need on the parent element (.box):

.box {
    display: flex;
    flex-wrap: wrap; /* optional. only if you want the items to wrap */
    justify-content: center; /* for horizontal alignment */
    align-items: center; /* for vertical alignment */
}

.box {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  /* optional. only if you want the items to wrap */
  justify-content: center;
  /* for horizontal alignment */
  align-items: center;
  /* for vertical alignment */
}
* {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}
html,
body {
  height: 100%;
}
.box {
  height: 200px;
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  border: 2px solid tomato;
}
.box div {
  margin: 0 10px;
    width: 100px;
}
.item1 {
  height: 50px;
  background: pink;
}
.item2 {
  background: brown;
  height: 100px;
}
.item3 {
  height: 150px;
  background: orange;
}
<div class="box">
  <div class="item1">A</div>
  <div class="item2">B</div>
  <div class="item3">C</div>
</div>

If you need to support older browsers which use older syntax for flexbox here's a good place to look.

share|improve this answer
    
    
what do you mean by "syntax is outdated", is it deprecated? – Konga Raju Sep 6 '13 at 10:18
1  
The Flexbox specification has gone through 3 major revisions. The most recent draft is from Sept 2012, which officially deprecates all previous drafts. However, browser support is spotty (particularly old Android browsers): stackoverflow.com/questions/15662578/… – cimmanon Oct 1 '13 at 20:33
    
This worked for me in Chrome when Justin Poliey's version didn't. – Vern Jensen Jun 29 at 2:50

It cannot be centered if you don't give it a width, otherwise it will take, by default the whole horizontal space.

share|improve this answer
29  
and if you don't know the width? Say because the content is dynamic? – gman Jun 2 '11 at 15:45
    
Posted a solution to the case when you don't know the width above. – Alfred Jan 20 '12 at 10:47

CSS3's box-align property

#outer {
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
    display:box;
    box-orient:horizontal;
    box-pack:center;
    box-align:center;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I realy like this even though it currently has compatibility issues becuase it expresses what is required (to center the content). – epeleg Mar 19 '12 at 12:00
4  
Make sure you read this answer first before you go about implementing this solution. – cimmanon Apr 24 '13 at 18:52

Set the width and set margin-left and margin-right to auto. That's for horizontal only, though. If you want both ways, you'd just do it both ways. Don't be afraid to experiment, it's not like you'll break anything

share|improve this answer
21  
Other than your layout, that is ;) – Sneakyness Jul 24 '09 at 22:00

I recently had to center a "hidden" div (ie, display:none;) that had a tabled form within it that needed to be centered on the page. I wrote the following jQuery to display the hidden div & then update the CSS to the automatic generated width of the table and change the margin to center it. (The display toggle is triggered by clicking on a link, but this code wasn't neccessary to display.)

NOTE: I'm sharing this code because Google brought me to this Stack Overflow solution & everything would have worked except that hidden elements don't have any width & can't be resized/centered until after they are displayed.

<div id="inner" style="display:none;">
    <form action="">
    <table id="innerTable">
        <tr><td>Name:</td><td><input type="text"></td></tr>
        <tr><td>Email:</td><td><input type="text"></td></tr>
        <tr><td>Email:</td><td><input type="submit"></td></tr>
    </table>
    </form>
</div>

<script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript">
$(function(){
    $('#inner').show().width($('#innerTable').width()).css('margin','0 auto');
});
</script>
share|improve this answer

The way I usually do it is using absolute position:

#inner{
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
    position: absolute;
}

The outer div doesn't need any extra propertites for this to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Justin Poliey wrote only 2 lines, you did 5... – Barnee May 21 '13 at 7:43
    
I tried every single one on this thread and they all failed. YOURS WORKED! Thank you! – Mark Löwe Mar 19 '14 at 9:29
1  
This is the one that worked for me, thanks! Maybe because in my case the parent has position:absolute? and btw if you want to make it vertically centered too, add top:0; bottom:0 and change margin into margin:auto – user2230662 Jun 18 '14 at 20:56

Centering a div of unknown height and width

Horizontally and vertically. Works with reasonably modern browsers (FF, Safari/Webkit, Chrome, IE10, Opera, etc.)

HTML:

<div class="content">This works with any content</div>

CSS:

.content {
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;
  top: 50%;
  -webkit-transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
}

Tinker with it further on Codepen or on JSBin

share|improve this answer
    
This is how I tend to center things because I don't like specifying widths/heights unless I have to. I use a center-vertical and center-horizonal class though to make it reusable. Note that the transform is different if you specify both classes on a single element. – Akrikos May 17 at 18:34
    
Certainly the best method - this should be the accepted answer – Henry Gibson May 25 at 14:33

Chris Coyier who wrote an excellent post on 'Centering in the Unknown' on his blog. It's a roundup of multiple solutions. I posted one that isn't posted in this question. It has more browser support then the flexbox-solution, and you're not using display: table; which could break other things.

/* This parent can be any width and height */
.outer {
  text-align: center;
}

/* The ghost, nudged to maintain perfect centering */
.outer:before {
  content: '.';
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width:0;
  overflow:hidden;
}

/* The element to be centered, can
   also be of any width and height */ 
.inner {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width: 300px;
}
share|improve this answer

Another solution for this without having to set a width for one of the elements is using the CSS3 transform attribute.

#outer {
  position: relative;
}

#inner {
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;

  transform: translateX(-50%);
}

The trick ist, that translateX(-50%) sets the #inner element 50 percent to the left of its own width. You can use the same trick for vertical alignment.

Here's a Fiddle showing horizontal and vertical alignment.

More information on Mozilla Developer Network.

share|improve this answer
1  
One may need vendor prefixes as well : -webkit-transform: translate(-50%,0); -moz-transform: translate(-50%,0); -ms-transform: translate(-50%,0); -khtml-transform: translate(-50%,0); -o-transform: translate(-50%,0); – Skippy le Grand Gourou Sep 2 '15 at 13:48

I realize I'm pretty late to the game, but this is a very popular question, and I recently found an approach I haven't seen mentioned anywhere here, so I figured I'd document it.

#outer {
    position: absolute;
    left: 50%;
}

#inner {
    position: relative;
    left: -50%;
}

EDIT: both elements must be the same width to function correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
@Jeroen I see. That's not quite what my answer is, though. For instance, it can be used for this setup (I changed absolute to relative for element-centered, not page-centered). – BenjaminRH Jul 19 '13 at 14:50
    
I see now, I'll remove my earlier comments: your last fiddle makes sense. – Jeroen Jul 19 '13 at 15:50
    
Just set this rule for #inner only: #inner { position:relative; left:50%; transform:translateX(-50%); }. This works for any width. – Jose Rui Santos Nov 24 '15 at 10:30

HTML

<div id="outerDiv">
    <div id="innerDiv">Inner Content</div>
</div>

CSS

#outerDiv
{
    width:500px;
}

#innerDiv
{
    width:200px;
    margin:0 auto;
}
share|improve this answer

For Firefox & Chrome:

<div style="width:100%;">
    <div style="width: 50%; margin: 0px auto;">
    </div>
</div>

For IE, Firefox & Chrome:

<div style="width:100%; text-align:center;">
    <div style="width: 50%; margin: 0px auto; text-align:left;">
    </div>
</div>

The text-align: property is optional.

share|improve this answer
3  
There is no need for text-align property. It's completely un-necessary. – Touhid Rahman May 23 '13 at 5:29

For example see this link.

<div id="outer" style="width:100%;">  
    <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>

And your css looks like this

div#outer {
    height: 120px;
    background-color: red;
}

div#inner {
    width: 50%;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: green;
    margin: 0 auto;
    text-align:center; /* For Text alignment to center horizentaly. */
    line-height: 120px; /* For Text alignment to center verticaly. */
}

If you have a lot of children under a parent, so your css must be like this example on fiddle.

Html look likes this

<div id="outer" style="width:100%;">  
    <div class="inner"> Foo Text </div>
    <div class="inner"> Foo Text </div>
    <div class="inner"> Foo Text </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> Foo Text </div>
</div>

Then see this example on fiddle.

share|improve this answer

Here is what you want in the shortest way.

JSFIDDLE

#outer {
    margin - top: 100 px;
    height: 500 px; /* you can set whatever you want */
    border: 1 px solid# ccc;
}

#inner {
    border: 1 px solid# f00;
    position: relative;
    top: 50 % ;
    transform: translateY(-50 % );
}
share|improve this answer
2  
That centers it vertically. – Michael Terry Feb 6 '15 at 0:24

You can do something like this

#container {
   display: table;
   width: <width of your container>;
   height: <height of your container>;
}

#inner {
   width: <width of your center div>;
   display: table-cell;
   margin: 0 auto;
   text-align: center;
   vertical-align: middle;
}

This will also align the #inner vertically. If you don't want to, remove the display and vertical-align properties;

share|improve this answer

Well, I managed to find a solution that maybe will fit all situations, but uses javascript:

Here's the structure:

<div class="container">
  <div class="content">Your content goes here!</div>
  <div class="content">Your content goes here!</div>
  <div class="content">Your content goes here!</div>
</div>

And here's the javascript snippet:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('.container .content').each( function() {
    container = $(this).closest('.container');
    content = $(this);

    containerHeight = container.height();
    contentHeight = content.height();

    margin = (containerHeight - contentHeight) / 2;
    content.css('margin-top', margin);
  })
});

If you want to use it in a responsive approach, you can add the following:

$(window).resize(function() {
  $('.container .content').each( function() {
    container = $(this).closest('.container');
    content = $(this);

    containerHeight = container.height();
    contentHeight = content.height();

    margin = (containerHeight - contentHeight) / 2;
    content.css('margin-top', margin);
  })
});
share|improve this answer

Try playing around with

margin: 0 auto;

If you want to center your text too, try using:

text-align: center;
share|improve this answer
    
text-align work for text alignment in its container not for its container to its parent. – Lalit Kumar Dec 4 '13 at 7:33
    
Nevertheless, in a similar situation this was exactly what I needed (aligning input elements). – Michael Lemke Jun 25 '14 at 9:49

one option is existed that i found every body say use

margin: auto 0;

but there is another option set this property for parent div , it is anytime work perfect

text-align:center;

and see , child go center

and finally css for you

#outer{
     text-align:center;
     display:block;/* or inline-block - base on your need*/
}

#inner
{
     position:relative;
     margin:0 auto; /* it is good to be */
}
share|improve this answer
    
text-align work for text alignment in its container not for its container to its parent. – Lalit Kumar Dec 4 '13 at 7:32
    
i test it , i problem with set child to center , must when you have more one child , more times margin:0 auto font answer , but , text-align center , for parent make this child be center , even if they are element and not be text , test and see what happen – Pnsadeghy Dec 4 '13 at 8:35
    
text-align center text only. You right at this time but when you write a container css which contains a child with different width and color your code does't work. Test it again!!!! – Lalit Kumar Dec 4 '13 at 9:23
    
See this example jsfiddle.net/uCdPK/2 and tell me what do you think about it!!!!! – Lalit Kumar Dec 4 '13 at 10:03

The easiest way:

<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner"></div>
</div>

<style>
    #outer {
        width:100%;
        text-align:center;
    }
    #inner {
        margin:auto;
        width:200px;
    }
</style>

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/joan16v/fnaqakdn/

share|improve this answer
1  
As your fiddle notes, #inner has to have a width set on it. – Michael Terry Feb 5 '15 at 21:06
    
you are right. changed. – joan16v Feb 6 '15 at 8:03

If Anyone would like a Jquery for center align these divs

$(window).bind("load", function() {
    var wwidth = $("#outer").width();
    var width = $('#inner').width();
    $('#inner').attr("style", "padding-left: " + wwidth / 2 + "px; margin-left: -" + width / 2 + "px;");
});
share|improve this answer

If width of the content is unknown, you can use the following method that requires one extra element. Suppose we have these two elements:

  • outer (100% wide, suppose it is 1000px wide)
  • inner (no width defined, suppose it is 300px wide)

Proceed as follows:

  1. Wrap inner inside center-helper
  2. Float center-helper; it becomes same size as inner (this makes it 300px wide)
  3. Push center-helper 50% right relative to its parent (this places its left at 500px wrt. outer)
  4. Pull inner 50% left relative to its parent (this places its left at -150px wrt. center-helper which means its left is at 500 - 150 = 350px wrt. outer)
  5. Set overflow on outer to hidden

Here is the CSS:

.outer {
    overflow: hidden;
}
.center-helper {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    left: 50%;
}
.inner {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    left: -50%;
}

And here is the demo

share|improve this answer
#inner {
    width: 50%;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thnx for trying to help the OP :). You shouldn't add answers that are exactly the same as answers already provided. I'm guessing the collision is a mistake but this could have been completely copied and pasted from the accepted answer. – Rapnar Oct 20 '15 at 17:49

Centering only horizontally

In my experience, the best way to center a box horizontally, is to apply the following properties :

The container :

  • should have text-align : center;

The content box :

  • should have display: inline-block;

Demo :

.container {
    width: 100%;
    height: 120px;
    background: #ccc;
    text-align : center;
}

.centered-content {
    display: inline-block;
    background: #fff;
    padding : 20px;
    border : 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="container">
    <div class="centered-content">
        Center this!
   </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!


Centering both horizontally & vertically

In my experience, the best way to center a box both vertically and horizontally, is to use an additional container and apply the following properties :

The outher container :

  • should have display: table;

The inner container :

  • should have display: table-cell;
  • should have vertical-align: middle;
  • should have text-align: center;

The content box :

  • should have display: inline-block;

Demo :

.outer-container {
    display: table;
    width: 100%;
    height: 120px;
    background: #ccc;
}

.inner-container {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
}

.centered-content {
    display: inline-block;
    background: #fff;
    padding : 20px;
    border : 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="outer-container">
   <div class="inner-container">
     <div class="centered-content">
        Center this!
     </div>
   </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is perfect to me. – Quan May 6 at 22:46

Nice thing I recently found, mixing the use of line-height+vertical-align and the 50% left trick, you can center a dynamically sized box inside another dynamically sized box, on both the horizontal and vertical using pure CSS.

Note you must use spans (and inline-block), tested in modern browsers + IE8. HTML:

  <h1>Center dynamic box using only css test</h1>
    <div class="container">
        <div class="center">
            <div class="center-container">
                <span class="dyn-box">
                    <div class="dyn-head">This is a head</div>
                    <div class="dyn-body">
                        This is a body<br />
                        Content<br />
                        Content<br />
                        Content<br />
                        Content<br />
                    </div>
                </span>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

CSS:

        .container
        {
            position:absolute;
            left:0;right:0;top:0;bottom:0;
            overflow:hidden;
        }
        .center
        {
            position:absolute;
            left:50%; top:50%;
        }
        .center-container
        {
            position:absolute;
            left:-2500px;top:-2500px;
            width:5000px;height:5000px;
            line-height:5000px;
            text-align:center;
            overflow: hidden;
        }
        .dyn-box
        {
            display: inline-block;
            vertical-align: middle;
            line-height: 100%;

            /* Purely asthetic below this point */
            background: #808080;
            padding: 13px;
            border-radius: 11px;
            font-family: arial;
        }
        .dyn-head
        {
            background:red;
            color:white;
            min-width: 300px;
            padding: 20px;
            font-size: 23px;
        }
        .dyn-body
        {
            padding: 10px;
            background:white;
            color:red;
        }

See example here.

share|improve this answer

protected by Jeff Atwood Jul 13 '10 at 0:03

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