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I am writing to csv in python, and I was wondering why my output files are blank when the program completes running. First off, here is my code:

reader = csv.reader(open(location, 'rU'), delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')
writer = csv.writer(open('temp.csv', 'wb'), delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')

writer.writerow(["test", "test", "test", "test", "test", "test", "test"])

count = 0
for row in reader:
    if count != 0 and count < len(split):
        writer.writerow([row[0], row[1], row[2], row[3], row[4], row[5], split[count-1]])
    count = count + 1

I know a few things about it:

  • When the program finishes, all that is written to 'temp.csv' is the "test" line. The rest of the document is empty.
  • If I force stop the program in the middle of running, there is in fact text being written to the file: it just gets wiped for some reason.
  • I've done some research, and lots of people have found that "closing" the csv file solves their problems, but that doesn't seem to work for me, unless I am missing something obvious!

Thanks in advance for your help!

Edit: here is some updated code I am working with:

infile = open(location, 'rU')
outfile = open('temp.csv', 'wb')
reader = csv.reader(infile, delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')
writer = csv.writer(outfile, delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')
split = email_text.split('NEW MESSAGE BEGINS HERE')

count = 0
for row in reader:
    if count != 0 and count < len(split):
        writer.writerow([row[0], row[1], row[2], row[3], row[4], row[5], split[count-1]])
        outfile.flush()
    count = count + 1

infile.close()
outfile.close()
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1  
How would you close the file? You're not saving a file handle on which you could use the .close() method. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 12 '12 at 14:52
    
Aside: instead of manually incrementing count, you could use for count, row in enumerate(reader):. –  DSM Jul 12 '12 at 14:54
    
@brian: I just had a crazy idea. Could you add a print count statement inside your loop and confirm that count is actually going up? –  DSM Jul 12 '12 at 16:46
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2 Answers 2

You're not closing the file. While this may work fine if you're just reading a file, it's definitely not a good idea to do this when writing a file.

Use a context manager:

with open(location, 'rU') as infile, open('temp.csv', 'wb') as outfile:
    reader = csv.reader(infile, delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')
    writer = csv.writer(outfile, delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')
    ...

This ensures that the files will be closed when the with block is exited (even if it's because of an exception).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I tried that, and i got an "Invalid syntax" error at the "with open(location, 'rU')" bit. Sorry, I'm new to python! –  brian Jul 12 '12 at 14:53
    
@brian: You must be using an old version of Python. with is available since Python 2.6 (and on Python 2.5 if you start your script with from __future__ import with_statement). –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 12 '12 at 14:55
    
I'm using python 2.4.3, but I'm on a network, so I don't have privileges to install or update anything. Is there any way to read these in 2.4.3? –  brian Jul 12 '12 at 14:58
    
Whoa. How old is Python 2.4 again? Over 6 years? OK, well then no with statement for you. But you can still do infile = open(...) and outfile = open(...), then do reader = csv.reader(infile,...) etc., and finally call infile.close() and especially outfile.close(). –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 12 '12 at 14:59
    
Okay, I did this, and it still didn't leave me with anything in my outfile! I'm not sure what the problem is... –  brian Jul 12 '12 at 15:10
show 5 more comments

Change the first two lines to save the opened file handles, and then include close invocations afterwards

reader_file = open(location, 'rU')
writer_file = open('temp.csv', 'wb')
reader = csv.reader(reader_file, delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')
writer = csv.writer(writer_file, delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')

# ... rest of code ...

reader_file.close()
writer_file.close()
share|improve this answer
    
This didn't work for me, I am still left with an empty outfile! –  brian Jul 12 '12 at 15:11
    
There might be an issue with your if statement. Else, did you intend for the writer_file to be opened in binary mode? –  Prashant Kumar Jul 12 '12 at 15:15
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