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I would like to use a RegEx in order to verify that an input is

empty -> to 100

exemple : 0 or 1 or 10,1 or 20.2 or 99

Only positive values, 0 or null value to 100, and accepting dot and comma. Anyone could give me the right C# regex please ?

Thanks a lot :)

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1  
Can you expand upon examples by explicitly noting given input and expected output? –  Austin Salonen Jul 12 '12 at 15:11
    
mikesdotnetting.com/Article/46/… –  Sam I am Jul 12 '12 at 15:13
    
True : 0 or 0,1 or 1 or 9 or 10 or 21,1 or 21.1 or 100 –  Walter Fabio Simoni Jul 12 '12 at 15:14
    
False : -1 or >100 (->101,etc...) –  Walter Fabio Simoni Jul 12 '12 at 15:14

4 Answers 4

Try this (if there is a comma or a period, at least one following digit is required):

^\d*(?:(?:\.|\,)\d+)?$

A great tool for these requests: http://regexpal.com/

Regards

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Lots of samples for numeric regex's can be found here

Regex Lib

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Regex is about matching characters. It doesn't understand about numbers.

Try parsing it instead using double.TryParse(), and if that fails because the string has , as instead of ., replace , with . and then try again.

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Try this:

(100|\d{1,2}[.,]\d+)

But it's more correct to use Double.Parse() here.

string str = '10,1';
bool valid = false;
double num = -1;

str = str.Replace(",", ".");

if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(str)) {
    valid = true;
} else {
    try {
        num = Double.Parse(str);
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        valid = false;
    }

    if (num >= 0 && num <= 100) {
        valid = true;
    }
}

*Why didn't I use Double.TryParse() instead?

Sadly, failure to parse will make the outcome 0, which falls to the valid condition.

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