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First, some context:

In my controllers, I return RedirectToAction's on successful HTTP POSTs. I use TempData to hold onto the user's entered model data so that the method I redirect to can use this input data again.

Example: 1. Enter userID into search field. 2. Click button, POST is performed, user is found in database through my repository, userID stored in TempData, call RedirectToAction("Edit")

TempData["user"] = searchViewModel.userID;
return RedirectToAction("Edit");
  1. perform edits on Edit view, click commit button, user info is stored in TempData, call RedirectToAction("Confirm");
  2. display changes made on the Confirm view, click "Confirm", final HTTP POST is performed and changes are made through my repository service.

This seems to work well. In order to handle people trying to skip ahead to a page in the address bar by typing "../Edit/Confirm" I have this check in my Confirm method:

if (TempData["editUserViewModel"] == null)
  return RedirectToActionPermanent("Edit");

Is this the best way to handle address bar input? I also do TempData.Keep("editUserViewModel") so that refreshes work. Is this the best way to handle refreshes?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For going from step 1 to 2, I would suggest a paramaterized action instead:

  1. Enter userID into search field.
  2. Click button, POST is performed, user is found in database through my repository
  3. Call RedirectToAction("Edit", new {UserId = foundUserId})

Also, when searching, you probably shouldn't be doing a POST. A GET is just fine when you are looking for information and not mutating it. This avoids the PRG pattern altogether for the first place where you are using tempdata, since you do a GET instead of a POST.

As for the confirm, there is another way to do this without tempdata. Instead of redirecting to your Confirm action, POST to it, and return your confirm viewmodel. Only after that second POST do you hit the repos and finish out the PRG pattern after the POST with a Redirect and finally a Get.

Users should not be able to do any type of GET for your Confirm action, as can be seen by your bandaid for it. So, just don't allow gets at all. POST from the edit form to the confirm action, return a view, and then POST from that view to a second POST action method. Since these are all part of the same process, you shouldn't have to deal with redirects or tempdata until the process is complete (repos updated).

Update (reply to comments)

1.) If I remove the [HttpPost] attribute on my SearchUser function, how will my search button on the view know what to call?

Your search button is nested within a <form> HTML element. You will need to change the form's method to GET. If the attribute is not present, I believe POST is the default. Your search button will remain the same, but the form will submit the user-enetered input as an HTTP GET request instead of an HTTP POST:

<form method="GET">
    ...
    <input type="submit" value="Search" />
</form>

2.) Can you clarify removing the Redirect to Confirm? I'm having trouble understanding how I would change a Redirect to a POST

It's difficult to explain this to someone just starting with web development, but in essence, every redirect is always an HTTP GET request. This is why you had to put the data into session (tempdata uses session) in order to maintain it across stateless requests.

Basically, here is your workflow:

  1. User enters search input and clicks submit
  2. The search in (1) is sent as a GET request to some action method, which returns a view.
  3. The view returned in (2) contains a <form method="POST" action="/Users/StillNeedsConfirmationAction"> with additional input elements. This is the form that will be used to edit data.
  4. User inputs data in the form view from (3) and clicks submit.
  5. The action method StillNeedsConfirmationAction on your UsersController accepts an HTTP POST with a viewmodel object. Rather than redirecting though, the action simply returns another view, passing the same viewmodel object.
  6. The view returned in (5) contains a <form method="POST" action="/Users/ConfirmAndUpdateAction">. It will render hidden inputs for each text box or other form element in your previous POST form.
  7. User clicks submit on the second form to confirm fields
  8. The action method ConfirmAndUpdateAction on your UsersController accepts an HTTP POST with the same viewmodel object that your other POST action did. However instead of returning another view, this time it saves the data in your repository and redirects.
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Great post. Questions: 1. If I remove the [HttpPost] attribute on my SearchUser function, how will my search button on the view know what to call? I'm very new to MVC/web development and am currently working an internship. 2. Can you clarify removing the Redirect to Confirm? I'm having trouble understanding how I would change a Redirect to a POST. –  barnone Jul 12 '12 at 19:37
    
I've been researching a bit. Should I change my buttons into Html.ActionLink()s? –  barnone Jul 12 '12 at 20:22
    
No, see my updated answer. Your form can send a GET request by changing its method attribute. –  danludwig Jul 12 '12 at 20:32
    
This is great. I've implemented a lot of changes. My concern is the address bar URL, and the fact that returning Views does not change the address. When I click my POST button on the edit page, it takes me to the "Confirm" view but the address URL still shows "../edit". Also, the userId parameter is displayed in the address bar when searching for a user. Is this a safe practice? –  barnone Jul 13 '12 at 17:01
    
The reason for the URL not changing is probably because you have the ../edit route mapped to 2 actions with the same name, 1 GET, and 1 POST. If so you can solve this by renaming the Edit POST action to something else, like Confirm, and rename the Confirm POST action to something like Commit. Then you would go from search GET, to edit GET, to confirm POST, to commit POST. As for safety, your user entered the userId, so they know where it came from. The only way to truly encrypt it going over the wire is with HTTPS/SSL. –  danludwig Jul 13 '12 at 17:18

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