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I have encountered a slightly unusual problem. Consider the following code:

class parser
{
    lexer lex;

public:

    node_ptr parse(const std::string& expression)
    {
        lex.init(expression.begin(), expression.end());
        // ...
        // call some helper methods
        // return the result
    }

private:

    // lots of small helper methods, many of them accessing lex
};

The parse method initializes the lexer with an init method. Before that, the lexer is in an unusable "default" state. Usually, one should intialize a member during construction, so why don't I simply do this:

class parser
{
    lexer lex;

public:

    parser(const std::string& expr) : lex(expr.begin(), expr.end()) {}

    node_ptr parse()
    {
        // call some helper methods
        // return the result
    }
    // ...
};

First, this means a client can call the parse method multiple times, which wouldn't make much sense.

Second, and more importantly, it can very easily cause serious lifetime issues:

parser my_parser("1 * 2 + 3 * 4");
auto root = my_parser.parse();

In the above code, the lexer will be initialized with a temporary string object that ceases to exist at the end of the line, so calling the parse method in the next line will invoke undefined behavior.

For both of these reasons, I really want to initialize and parse in the same method. Unfortunately, I cannot do it in the constructor, because I need to return a result, and constructors cannot return results.

Technically it is possible to construct the lexer inside the parse method and destruct it afterwards if I also change the constructor and the destructor accordingly:

class parser
{
    static std::string dummy;
    lexer lex;

public:

    parser() : lex(dummy.begin(), dummy.end())
    {
        lex.~lexer();
    }

    node_ptr parse(const std::string& expression)
    {
        new(&lex) lexer(expression.begin(), expression.end());
        // call some helper methods
        lex.~lexer();
        // return the result
    }

    ~parser()
    {
        new(&lex) lexer(dummy.begin(), dummy.end());
    }
    // ...
};

But this is by far the ugliest code I have written in a very long time. It's also not exception-safe; what if a helper method throws? Indeed, that's exactly what happens when a parse error is encountered.

So how should I solve this issue? Use a local lexer inside parse and have a lexer* member point to it? Use a boost::optional<lexer> member? Or should I just live with the init method? Or should I do the parsing in the constructor after all and throw an "expection" containing the desired result?

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Out of curiosity, what is it that you're building there? :) –  Luchian Grigore Jul 12 '12 at 16:02
2  
If the scope is a single method, why do you want to keep it as a member? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 12 '12 at 16:03
    
@David As I've written in the code comment, there are "lots of small helper methods, many of them accessing lex". –  FredOverflow Jul 12 '12 at 16:05
2  
If the helper methods need lex, why not pass it as an argument? –  Luc Touraille Jul 12 '12 at 16:06
1  
@FredOverflow: You can also shoot yourself in the foot, but it does not necessarily make sense. A cleaner design would have a helper class, instantiated in parser::parse, that takes a lexer (created locally in parse()) performs the operations and yields the node_ptr... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 12 '12 at 16:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would definitely not do your 2nd example. Better would be constructing the lexer in Parse(), and store a pointer or boost::optional. But if you want to allow this, then your helper functions must check whether the lexer is valid or not before continuing. Seems messy to me.

Better yet is to just make Parse a standalone function. I envision this to be more sensible to callers, and solve your problem:

void parser_helper(lexer& lex)
{
    ...
}

node_ptr Parse(const std::string& inp)
{
    lexer lex(inp);
    ...
    parser_helper(lex);
    ...
    return ret;
}

Or if you have more state to pass around...

class parser_helper
{
    lexer lex;
    ... other state here

public:
    parser_helper(const std::string& inp) :
        lex(inp)
    {
    }

    ... helper functions here.
    void helper_function() { }
}

node_ptr Parse(const std::string& inp)
{
    parser_helper helper(inp);
    ...
    helper.helper_function();
    ...
    return ret;
}

Either way, the lexer should just be an auto variable in the Parse function.

The idea is that the interface the caller expects is just a single function. No need to make the caller deal with a class, just because the internals of Parse have state / helper functions.

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You present no reason why parse (and indeed, lex) should not be simple functions. In addition, you present no cause for parse to take the expression, or take an initialized lexer.

Edit:

Or simply create them as lambdas on the stack of parse. However, as I've said, I can see the need for parser to exist. But it doesn't seem to need to exist outside of the member method of parse itself, questioning why you don't refactor that method to go outside the class. Something like

class parser { 
    lexer l;
     // stuff
};
node_ptr parse(...) { 
    parser p(...); 
    return p(); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
As I've written in the code comment, there are "lots of small helper methods, many of them accessing lex". That's why I need a class. And I gave the lifetime issue as a reason why I want parse to take the expression and not the constructor. –  FredOverflow Jul 12 '12 at 16:07
    
@FredOverflow: This is not a valid reason, you could use free functions with parameters, thereby completely removing the need for the parser class. –  Luc Touraille Jul 12 '12 at 16:08
2  
Or simply create a second class for which the lexer always exists and instantiate it on the stack for the parse free function. –  Puppy Jul 12 '12 at 16:08
    
Splitting a huge function into many small functions who need to share state is a perfectly valid reason to introduce a class if you've read "Clean Code" by Robert Martin. I'd use monads or implicit parameters instead, but (un?)fortunately, C++ doesn't support them (yet) :) –  FredOverflow Jul 12 '12 at 16:11
1  
@FredO: Or simply create them as lambdas on the stack of parse. However, as I've said, I can see the need for parser to exist. But it doesn't seem to need to exist outside of the member method of parse itself, questioning why you don't refactor that method to go outside the class. Something like class parser { lexer l; // stuff }; node_ptr parse(...) { parser p(...); return p(); } –  Puppy Jul 12 '12 at 16:13

In the above code, the lexer will be initialized with a temporary string object that ceases to exist at the end of the line, so calling the parse method in the next line will invoke undefined behavior.

That doesn't make sense. You could make a copy of the temporary string and use it in the lexer.

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What do you mean "That doesn't make sense"? It's exactly what will happen if someone passes a string literal to the constructor. –  FredOverflow Jul 12 '12 at 16:08
    
@FredOverflow: But that is not a problem, because you could work with a string which will exist as long as lex exists. What stops you from doing so? –  Nawaz Jul 12 '12 at 16:10
1  
@FredO: But he absolutely makes the correct point that you could simply copy this string. –  Puppy Jul 12 '12 at 16:10
    
Well, copying the string certainly is a lot cleaner than all the other solutions I could come up with so far, but probably also less efficient. I guess I'll do that if nobody comes up with a better idea. –  FredOverflow Jul 12 '12 at 16:17
    
@FredOverflow: less efficient? How big your expression would be? –  Nawaz Jul 12 '12 at 16:21

Use a local lexer inside parse and have a lexer* member point to it?

That gets my vote. That way you have complete control over its lifetime.

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