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I created a table with the following fields:

Record:
Id                 int Primary Key, Auto Increment
ForeignId          int
IsDuplicateRecord bit NULL

Then I inserted some data:

INSERT INTO Record (ForeignId)
VALUES (5), (5), (1), (2), (3)

After that, I ran the following update statement, (found at http://archive.msdn.microsoft.com/SQLExamples/Wiki/View.aspx?title=DuplicateRows ):

UPDATE Record
SET IsDuplicateRecord = 1
WHERE Id IN (
    SELECT MAX(Id)
    FROM Record
    GROUP BY ForeignId
    HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
)

So far so good, the query affected one row, and the table now looks like this:

Id ForeignId IsDuplicateRecord
0  5         NULL
1  5         1
2  1         NULL
3  2         NULL
4  3         NULL

I was happy, because for a moment I thought everything was going to be just fine. But then a suspicion as dark as the clouds outside crossed my mind: Dreadingly, I typed

INSERT INTO Record (ForeignId)
VALUES (1), (1)

and ran the above query again, which this time yielded:

Id  ForeignId  IsDuplicateRecord
0   0          NULL
1   5          1
2   1          NULL
3   2          NULL
4   3          NULL
5   1          NULL
6   1          1

So I figured I'd head over to StackOverflow, and see who could explain to me why the IsDuplicatedRecord field in row with ID 5 wasn't updated to 1? Are you the one?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because the SQL you ran only marks the last of the duplicates as duplicates. Try this instead:

UPDATE Record
SET IsDuplicateRecord = 1
WHERE Id NOT IN (
    SELECT MIN(Id)
    FROM Record
    GROUP BY ForeignId
)

This marks second and subsequent occurences of each ForeignId as duplicates as I think you require.

share|improve this answer
    
Just seen the accept and remove - if something doesn't work in this, please let me know, will attempt to resolve. –  David M Jul 13 '12 at 10:25
    
Sorry about that, I made a mistake in transferring your response, and thought the answer was wrong. Found out it was my mistake, and re-added the accept. Thanks a lot for this elegant solution. –  lowerkey Jul 13 '12 at 12:26
    
No worries. Glad it worked for you. –  David M Jul 13 '12 at 12:26
UPDATE Record uu
SET IsDuplicateRecord = 1
   -- if there exists a record with the same foreignid
   -- but a lower id
   -- this (uu) is a duplicate
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM Record ex 
    WHERE ex.ForeignId = uu.ForeignId
    AND ex.Id < uu.Id
    );

There is a subtle (but rude) difference between this EXISTS (...) subquery and @DavidM 's NOT IN (...) subquery: The NOT IN will not yield NULL values, and if "ForeignId" happens to be NULL, the NOT IN version would be "True", resulting in setting all isDuplicateRecord flag for all tuples with ForeignId IS NULL. (I suspect ForeignId is a FK, so it could well be NULLable)

For not-nullable ForeignId, the two versions are basically the same.

UPDATE: as @MartinSmith pointed out, Some implementations don't like a UPDATE ... WHERE without a FROM clause. We can use a selfjoined dummy. (also updated the first query to normal)

-- DROP SCHEMA tmp CASCADE;
-- CREATE SCHEMA tmp ;
-- SET search_path='tmp';

DROP TABLE zrecord CASCADE;
CREATE TABLE zrecord
        ( id SERIAL NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
        , foreign_id INTEGER -- REFERENCES zrecord(id)
        , is_duplicate boolean DEFAULT False
        );
SELECT * FROM zrecord;

INSERT INTO zrecord(foreign_id) VALUES(NULL),(1),(NULL),(1),(NULL),(2),(NULL);

SELECT * FROM zrecord;

EXPLAIN ANALYZE
UPDATE zrecord uu
SET is_duplicate = True
        --
        -- This selfjoin is needed if UPDATE ... WHERE needs a FROM TABLE
        --
FROM zrecord dum
WHERE  dum.id = uu.id
AND EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM zrecord ex
    WHERE ex.foreign_id = uu.foreign_id
    AND ex.Id < uu.Id
    );

SELECT * FROM zrecord;

UPDATE2: the PARTITION BY suffers from the same nullability problem as the IN clause, so it seems:

WITH zcte AS (
    SELECT *
    , row_number() OVER (PARTITION BY foreign_id ORDER BY id) AS rn
    FROM   zrecord
    )
SELECT * FROM zcte;

RESULT: (the original testset, before any update)

 id | foreign_id | is_duplicate | rn 
----+------------+--------------+----
  2 |          1 | f            |  1
  4 |          1 | t            |  2
  6 |          2 | f            |  1
  1 |            | f            |  1
  3 |            | f            |  2
  5 |            | f            |  3
  7 |            | f            |  4
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer this solution that recommends where exists..., but the answer is a bit lonely without the explanatory text David gave –  araqnid Jul 12 '12 at 17:53
    
They are basically the same (if foreignid is NOT NULLable ...) If it were nullable, the "NOT IN" could return an empty set for records with foreignid IS NULL. –  wildplasser Jul 12 '12 at 18:02
    
The question is tagged TSQL. If you want to alias the target table you need to specify a FROM clause. –  Martin Smith Jul 15 '12 at 12:15
    
No idea why are you testing in postgres for a question tagged TSQL. In SQL Server the nullable foreignid are all treated as one group and it does not give the results you say you get. –  Martin Smith Jul 15 '12 at 12:58
    
Because the point I want to make is semantic. BTW: it is also tagged sql, and the three-valued-logic problem is not dependent on the implementation, but inherently coupled with SQL. –  wildplasser Jul 15 '12 at 13:01

This has a lower estimated cost than either of the other two answers

;WITH CTE
     AS (SELECT *,
                Row_number() OVER (PARTITION BY ForeignId ORDER BY Id) AS RN
         FROM   Record)
UPDATE CTE
SET    IsDuplicateRecord = 1
WHERE  RN > 1 

Execution Plans

Plans

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't there be a NULLS LAST like ordering in there? –  wildplasser Jul 15 '12 at 12:43
    
@wildplasser - No. A primary key cannot be nullable. –  Martin Smith Jul 15 '12 at 12:44
    
But the partitioning is by foreignId. I'll add the result to to my update. –  wildplasser Jul 15 '12 at 12:48
    
@wildplasser - partitioning is grouping not ordering. Not sure what point you are making. –  Martin Smith Jul 15 '12 at 12:53
    
Look at my result from select from cte. The rownumbers >1 for the records with a NULL-FK are questionable. (but it depends on the OP's intention, of course) BTW: I am talking semantics, syntactic differences, like missing FROM "dual" clauses are details here. BTW: the question is also tagged "sql". –  wildplasser Jul 15 '12 at 12:57

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