Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm writing a texture loader, attempting to use libpng with it. I am currently stumped on one tiny part, which makes no sense. I'm trying to get the image width and height, and am finding that the returned values are not saving.

unsigned int width;
unsigned int height;

...

width = png_get_image_width(png_ptr, info_ptr);
height = png_get_image_height(png_ptr, info_ptr);

printf("Width: %d\nHeight: %d\n\n", width, height);
printf("Width: %d\nHeight: %d\n\n", png_get_image_width(png_ptr, info_ptr), png_get_image_height(png_ptr, info_ptr));

This returns the following:

Width: 0
Height: 0

Width: 1024
Height: 2048

So what's the deal? This should work, but it is very clearly not.

Pastbin of all relevent code: http://pastebin.com/9RP1iqqU

share|improve this question
    
You should be using %ud for unsigned integers IIRC. Not sure if that solves it. –  chris Jul 12 '12 at 16:22
    
That doesn't help, and just gives me "Width: 0d" rather than "Width: 0" Also, I have tried both signed and unsigned ints. –  Katherine1 Jul 12 '12 at 16:23
2  
Can you provide a short (20 lines or so) complete sample program that demonstrates the error? See sscce.org. –  Robᵩ Jul 12 '12 at 16:23
    
Yes, we would like to see the adventures of width and height down the way to printf, please. –  Desmond Hume Jul 12 '12 at 16:26
    
@Katherine1, Oh, guess I meant %u. Anyway, if that didn't work, we need an SSCCE. –  chris Jul 12 '12 at 16:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like you're using the wrong type. width and height should be png_uint_32 not unsigned int

UPDATE:

After seeing your pastebin, it looks like you're passing in width and height to the function as unsigned char which are effectively hiding the class members width and height and is probably not what you want, specifically since unsigned char can only hold values up to 255 and the width and height are 1024 and 2048.

Just rename the function parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh @Tony just beat me to it! :) –  peacemaker Jul 12 '12 at 16:27
3  
You need to put more (mostly useless) code in your answer to beat him back, a typical novice mistake.. :) –  Desmond Hume Jul 12 '12 at 16:28
    
tileWidth and TileHeight are different values. Those are the size of the textures contained in the image, not the image's size itself. I am not saving those values to width or height. –  Katherine1 Jul 12 '12 at 16:34
    
Although... I see a naming problem that could be doing that. –  Katherine1 Jul 12 '12 at 16:35
    
Please look at your code again. You might call them tileWidth and tileHeight in your definition but the implementation calls them width and height –  peacemaker Jul 12 '12 at 16:35

From the code you posted here, I may assume that he names of your member data in TextureAtlas class conflict with the names of the parameters in loadAtlas member function.

class TextureAtlas {
    protected:
        unsigned int width;
        unsigned int height;

    public:

        TextureAtlas();
        virtual ~TextureAtlas();

        void loadAtlas(std::string loc, unsigned char tileWidth, unsigned char tileHeight);
};

void TextureAtlas::loadAtlas(std::string loc, unsigned char width, unsigned char height) {
    ...
    width = png_get_image_width(png_ptr, info_ptr);
    height = png_get_image_height(png_ptr, info_ptr);
    color_type = png_get_color_type(png_ptr, info_ptr);
    bit_depth = png_get_bit_depth(png_ptr, info_ptr);

    printf("Width: %d\nHeight: %d\n\n", width, height);
    printf("Width: %d\nHeight: %d\n\n", png_get_image_width(png_ptr, info_ptr), png_get_image_height(png_ptr, info_ptr));
    ...

Either rename

unsigned int width;
unsigned int height;

or the last two parameters in

void TextureAtlas::loadAtlas(std::string loc, unsigned char width, unsigned char height)
share|improve this answer
    
Correct, this is exactly what I said in my answer :) –  peacemaker Jul 12 '12 at 16:36
    
So, putting more (useless) code in the answer didn't work this time.. –  Desmond Hume Jul 12 '12 at 16:42

I think your problem may lie in the fact you're using unsigned int to store the return type in, when in actual fact the return type is png_uint_32.

Have you tried doing this:

 png_uint_32 width = 0;
 png_uint_32 height = 0;

 width = png_get_image_width(png_ptr, info_ptr);
 height = png_get_image_height(png_ptr, info_ptr);

I haven't tried it, but I suspect very much that's the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
That did not solve the problem –  Katherine1 Jul 12 '12 at 16:29
1  
typedef unsigned long int png_uint_32; The only difference is the long, which for me, at least, is the same without. I was kind of wondering why it wouldn't be a normal int of some sort to produce that behaviour. –  chris Jul 12 '12 at 16:29
    
@chris I'm guessing this will all depend on what platform and the size of the CPU used. That's why it's a good idea to just used the png_uint_32 and not unsigned int. –  Tony The Lion Jul 12 '12 at 16:31
1  
@TonyTheLion, Definitely; I was just pointing out how it would work the same way for me in this case. –  chris Jul 12 '12 at 16:38

I assume you're trying the set the class members called width and height; however, you've hidden these with function parameters with the same names. These have type unsigned char, which (almost certainly) can't hold values larger than 256, which is why you see zero when you print them.

You can fix it by:

  • renaming either the arguments or the member variables so they don't clash; or
  • accessing the members as this->width and this->height
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.