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Is there any way for a compiled command-line program to tell bash or csh that it does not want any wildcard characters in its parameters expanded?

For instance, one might want a shell command like:

foo *

to simply return the numeric ASCII value of that character.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

No. The expansion takes place, before the command is actually run.
You can only disable the glob before running the command or by quoting the star.

$ # quote it
$ foo '*'

$ # or escape it
$ foo \*

$ # or disable the glob (noglob)
$ set -f
$ foo *
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also, if there is nothing to expand, there is no expansion. i.e. with an empty pwd, echo * is just * –  sam boosalis Mar 31 '14 at 23:48
1  
@sam This actually depends on how your options are set. From tldp: "If no matching file names are found, and the shell option nullglob is disabled, the word is left unchanged. If the nullglob option is set, and no matches are found, the word is removed." –  Chris Middleton Feb 6 at 18:05
    
thanks, I should've qualified that that was just from observation not from any understanding. –  sam boosalis Feb 6 at 21:31

While it is true a command itself can not turn off globbing, it is possible for a user to tell a Unix shell not to glob a particular command. This is usually accomplished by editing a shell's configuration files. Assuming the command foo can be found along the command path, the following would need to be added to the appropriate configuration file:

For the sh, bash and ksh shells:

alias foo='set -f;foo';foo(){ command foo "$@";set +f;}

For the csh and tcsh shells:

alias foo 'set noglob;\foo \!*;unset noglob'

For the zsh shell:

alias foo='noglob foo'

The command path does not have to be used. Say the command foo is stored in the directory ~/bin, then the above would become:

For the sh, bash and ksh shells:

alias foo='set -f;foo';foo(){ ~/bin/foo "$@";set +f;}

For the csh and tcsh shells:

alias foo 'set noglob;$home/bin/foo \!*;unset noglob'

For the zsh shell:

alias foo='noglob ~/bin/foo'

All of the above was tested using Apple's OSX 10.9.2. Note: When copying the above code, be careful about deleting any spaces. They may be significant.

Update:

User geira has pointed out that in the case of a bash shell

alias foo='set -f;foo';foo(){ ~/bin/foo "$@";set +f;}

could be replaced with

reset_expansion(){ CMD="$1";shift;$CMD "$@";set +f;}
alias foo='set -f;reset_expansion ~/bin/foo'

which eliminates the need for the function foo.

Some web sites used to create this document:

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This should have been the accepted answer as it proves it is indeed possible to do what the OP wants. For some even better methods in bash, this link documents the various options: blog.edwards-research.com/2011/05/preventing-globbing –  geira Apr 23 at 8:40
    
@geira: Sometimes an answer is accepted before a better answer is posted. I believe this may be one of those cases. I also believe the answer marks as most usefull by users ends up first. Note: I added your input to my answer. –  David Anderson Apr 27 at 14:11

The expansion is performed by the shell before your program is run. Your program has no clue as to whether expansion has occurred or not.

   setopt noglob

will switch off expansion in the invoking shell, but you'd have to do that before you invoke your program.

The alternative is to quote your arguments e.g.

foo "*"
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No. A Bourne-style shell always performs globbing when appropriate before executing the command. The user has to quote or escape the arguments to prevent globbing, like foo \*; the actual program being executed cannot indicate a preference.

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Also the Bourne-style shell has this option. It is not setopt, but set -o noglob. –  Anne van Rossum Dec 4 '13 at 12:57

Beware: if there are no names matching the mask, bash passes the argument as-is, without expansion!

Proof (pa.py is a very simple script, which just prints it's arguments):

 $ ls
f1.cc  f2.cc  pa.py
 $ ./pa.py *.cc
['./pa.py', 'f1.cc', 'f2.cc']
 $ ./pa.py *.cpp
['./pa.py', '*.cpp']
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