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I am trying to write a regular expression that facilitates an address, example 21-big walk way or 21 St.Elizabeth's drive I came up with the following regular expression but I am not too keen to how to incorporate all the characters (alphanumeric, space dash, full stop, apostrophe)

"regexp=^[A-Za-z-0-99999999'
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This is a very vague purpose for a REGEX. What are the limitations - what characters are allowed/disallowed? An address could contain practically anything. Also, 0-99999 will have no effect as this is a character class - it matches one character at a time, so it should be simply 0-9. –  Utkanos Jul 12 '12 at 16:50
    
Regex is either too specific, or too loose for this purpose. You can only validate to see something looks like an address or not. –  nhahtdh Jul 12 '12 at 16:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Dames,

See the answer to this question on address validating with regex: regex street address match

The problem is, street addresses vary so much in formatting that it's hard to code against them. If you are trying to validate addresses, finding if one isn't valid based on its format is mighty hard to do. This would return the following address (253 N. Cherry St. ), anything with its same format:

\d{1,5}\s\w.\s(\b\w*\b\s){1,2}\w*\.

This allows 1-5 digits for the house number, a space, a character followed by a period (for N. or S.), 1-2 words for the street name, finished with an abbreviation (like st. or rd.).

Because regex is used to see if things meet a standard or protocol (which you define), you probably wouldn't want to allow for the addresses provided above, especially the first one with the dash, since they aren't very standard. you can modify my above code to allow for them if you wish--you could add

(-?)

to allow for a dash but not require one.

In addition, http://rubular.com/ is a quick and interactive way to learn regex. Try it out with the addresses above.

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Thank you very much super helpful –  dames Jul 12 '12 at 18:47

I have succesfully used ;

Dim regexString = New stringbuilder
    With regexString
       .Append("(?<h>^[\d]+[ ])(?<s>.+$)|")                'find the 2013 1st ambonstreet 
       .Append("(?<s>^.*?)(?<h>[ ][\d]+[ ])(?<e>[\D]+$)|") 'find the 1-7-4 Dual Ampstreet 130 A
       .Append("(?<s>^[\D]+[ ])(?<h>[\d]+)(?<e>.*?$)|")    'find the Terheydenlaan 320 B3 
       .Append("(?<s>^.*?)(?<h>\d*?$)")                    'find the 245e oosterkade 9
    End With

    Dim Address As Match = Regex.Match(DataRow("customerAddressLine1"), regexString.ToString(), RegexOptions.Multiline)

    If Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(Address.Groups("s").Value) Then StreetName = Address.Groups("s").Value
    If Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(Address.Groups("h").Value) Then HouseNumber = Address.Groups("h").Value
    If Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(Address.Groups("e").Value) Then Extension = Address.Groups("e").Value

The regex will attempt to find a result, if there is none, it move to the next alternative. If no result is found, none of the 4 formats where present.

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In case if you don't have a fixed format for the address as mentioned above, I would use regex expression just to eliminate the symbols which are not used in the address (like specialized sybmols - &(%#$^). Result would be:

[A-Za-z0-9'\.\-\s\,]
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Regex is a very bad choice for this kind of task. Try to find a web service or an address database or a product which can clean address data instead.

Related:

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