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I was using the following query to try to find the differences between the results of a queries of two databases. I am not able to use the AccountID as a compare point since they don't line up between the different databases. The selects in the ctes both return 200105 rows but the result of the join on the cte has 201779 rows. The data in this case should be able to match up. Am I on the right track with this? If so what am I missing, or should I look to a different approach.

    with cteDev3 (AccountID, SecurityID, UniqueAccountID, BuyPrice, BuyDate, Shares)as
      (select Al.AccountID, al.SecurityID,ad.UniqueAccountId, BuyPrice, BuyDate, Shares
        from dev3TMAd.dbo.AccountLot al
        join dev3TMAd.dbo.AccountDetails ad
        on al.AccountID = ad.AccountId
        where ad.EnterpriseId = 'HuberFinancial'),
    cteTest2 (AccountID, SecurityID, UniqueAccountID, BuyPrice, BuyDate, Shares)as
       (select Al.AccountID, al.SecurityID,ad.UniqueAccountId, BuyPrice, BuyDate, Shares
        from test2TMAd.dbo.AccountLot al
        join test2TMAd.dbo.AccountDetails ad
        on al.AccountID = ad.AccountId
        where ad.EnterpriseId = 'HuberFinancial')

select c3.UniqueAccountId as 'Dev3' , t2.UniqueAccountId as 'Test2'
from cteTest2 t2
join cteDev3 c3
    on c3.UniqueAccountId = t2.UniqueAccountId
    and c3.SecurityID = t2.SecurityID
    and c3.BuyDate = t2.BuyDate
    and c3.Shares = t2.Shares
    and c3.BuyPrice = t2.BuyPrice

This is what the result sets look like for the subqueries that are part of the ctes:

AccountID | SecurityID | UniqueAccountId | BuyPrice | BuyDate | Shares
949662 | 17030 | 11284035 | 42.690021 | 2007-12-19 00:00:00 | 4.710000
949662 | 17030 | 11284035 | 42.690629 | 2007-12-19 00:00:00 | 13.521000
949662 | 17030 | 11284035 | 42.611940 | 2007-12-19 00:00:00 | 0.134000
949662 | 17030 | 11284035 | 39.323467 | 2008-03-10 00:00:00 | 0.946000
949662 | 17030 | 11284035 | 40.831884 | 2008-06-10 00:00:00 | 6.323000
949662 | 17030 | 11284035 | 30.730860 | 2008-09-09 00:00:00 | 6.335000
949662 | 17030 | 11284035 | 16.290063 | 2008-12-10 00:00:00 | 111.045000
950091 | 25885 | 11937183 | 14.629975 | 2012-03-23 00:00:00 | 12.337000
950091 | 25885 | 11937183 | 14.599671 | 2012-04-23 00:00:00 | 12.140000
950091 | 4325 | 11937183 | 11.082955 | 2012-01-27 00:00:00 | 6768.953000
950091 | 4325 | 11937183 | 11.119163 | 2012-01-31 00:00:00 | 1.242000
share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at EXCEPT and INTERSECT in Books Online? –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 12 '12 at 17:19
    
@AaronBertrand I don't think EXCEPT and INTERSECT will work here since AccountID is known to not match in these two queries unless the OP was ok with dropping that column –  Conrad Frix Jul 12 '12 at 17:22
    
Actually dropping the AccountID table is entirely possible. I can always use the UniqueAccountID as a reference if needed later. I will take a look at EXCEPT and INTERSECT. Thanks. –  Dan Snell Jul 12 '12 at 17:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you want to do a full outer join, in order to find the ones that do not match:

select (case when c3.UniqueAccountId is not null and t2.UniqueAccountId is not null
             then 'MATCH'
             when c3.UniqueAccountId is not null then 'DEV-ONLY'
             when t2.UniqueAccountId is not null then 'TEST-ONLY'
             else 'Oops!'
        end) as MatchType,
       c3.UniqueAccountId as 'Dev3', t2.UniqueAccountId as 'Test2'
from cteTest2 t2 full outer join
     cteDev3 c3
     on c3.UniqueAccountId = t2.UniqueAccountId and
        c3.SecurityID = t2.SecurityID and
        c3.BuyDate = t2.BuyDate and
        c3.Shares = t2.Shares and
        c3.BuyPrice = t2.BuyPrice 
share|improve this answer
    
actually this works pretty well for what I am doing. Thanks. –  Dan Snell Jul 12 '12 at 20:42

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