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I have a custom list control that displays items with thumbnails of images. Each list item is given the full path of the file and reads it asynchronously using FileStream.BeginRead, and it needs to invalidate the list control when the file read is complete.

At any time the list can also be cleared of items and repopulated with different items. This calls Dispose on each item which needs to gracefully handle disposing the filestream (which could still be in the middle of an async read).

I will show the code that I am using. I am not sure the proper usage of invoking and locking objects in a situation like this where a request to load a new file asynchronously could come while a different file is in the middle of loading asynchronously.

public string FileName { get; set; }
public Image Image { get; set; }
public Control Parent { get; set; }

private FileStream currentFileStream;
private byte[] buffer;
private object locker = new object();
private bool loading;
private bool disposed;

public void LoadImage(string fileName)
{
    FileName = fileName;

    lock (locker)
    {           
        currentFileStream = new FileStream(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read);
        buffer = new byte[currentFileStream.Length];
        currentFileStream.BeginRead(buffer, 0, buffer.Length, FileReadComplete, currentFileStream);

        loading = true;
    }
}

private void FileReadComplete(IAsyncResult ar)
{
    FileStream fileStreamComplete = (FileStream)ar.AsyncState;

    lock (locker)
    {
        fileStreamComplete.EndRead(ar);

        // If the finished FileStream is the more recent one requested
        // And this item has not been disposed
        if (fileStreamComplete == currentFileStream && !disposed)
        {
            try
            {
                loading = false;

                Image = new Bitmap(currentFileStream);

                currentFileStream.Close();
                currentFileStream.Dispose();

                Parent.Invalidate();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
            }
            finally
            {
                currentFileStream = null;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            fileStreamComplete.Close();
            fileStreamComplete.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    lock (locker)
    {
        base.Dispose(disposing);

        if (!disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                if (Image != null)
                    Image.Dispose();
            }

            disposed = true;
        }
    }
}

EDIT: Removed disposing of the currentFileStream from the Dispose() method.

EDIT #2: Removed the disposing of the currentFileStream from the LoadImage() function. It probably should not be there since the file read could be in progress and it can't be closed during the operation. It will get disposed no matter what when the FileReadComplete callback is called.

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1  
It crashes? What's the exception? What line does it crash on? –  Gabe Jul 12 '12 at 17:26
1  
Why are you using as if you don't intend to check if the cast failed? –  lc. Jul 12 '12 at 17:32
    
Why would it ever fail? It just sends back the reference given to it in the BeginRead. Even if the local reference is made null, the ObjectState reference will still exist. –  Trevor Elliott Jul 12 '12 at 17:51
    
I think the problem I am having is that I'm disposing of the FileStream when it is in the middle of an async request. Even if I lock the thread, I'm still disposing of it when it's in use and when the thread is unlocked the exceptions are raised in mscorlib.dll as it tries to access the FileStream to continue reading. I will update my code with this fix. –  Trevor Elliott Jul 12 '12 at 17:56
    
But I am still curious if this is in fact the proper procedure. –  Trevor Elliott Jul 12 '12 at 17:57

1 Answer 1

I am not sure I followed your code, but this is what I would recommend.

  1. Use a different FileStream constructor if you are planning to use it for async read only. It might be unrelated to your problem though, but just a better way of doing it

    
    currentFileStream = new FileStream(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read, 1024 * 8, true);
    

  2. Any reason you do not want to provide the path to Bitmap constructor (or Image.FromFile) and let it load the file? Remember that when loading a large number of files into memory, sequentially loading them might be faster (in case the files reside on sequential access technology like hard-disk)

Assuming, you still want to load it asynchronously, I would simply encapsulate that functionality in a class for "neatness"

You seem to be loading your Image from the same stream, that you already read into your buffer. I am sure that is a problem. Below is my adaptation of your code. Main changes are

  1. I don't find the use for currentFileStream variable
  2. dispose variable is made volatile, as it can be accessed from multiple threads
  3. Calls to FileStream.Dispose is redundant after FileStream.Close, so removed them

I haven't tried the code, so you have to tell me if it works

class ImageLoader : IDisposable {
    public string FileName { get; set; }
    public Image Image { get; set; }
    public Control Parent { get; set; }

    private FileStream currentFileStream;
    private byte[] buffer;
    private object locker = new object();
    Control parent;

    private volatile bool dispose = false;

    public ImageLoader(Control parent, string fileName) {
        Parent = parent;
        FileName = fileName;
        Image = null;

        currentFileStream = new FileStream(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read, 1024 * 8, true);
        buffer = new byte[currentFileStream.Length];
        currentFileStream.BeginRead(buffer, 0, buffer.Length, new AsyncCallback(FileReadComplete), null);
    }

    private void FileReadComplete(IAsyncResult ar) {
        lock (locker) {
            try { currentFileStream.EndRead(ar); } catch (ObjectDisposedException) { }

            if (!dispose) {
                using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(buffer))
                    Image = new Bitmap(ms);
                Parent.Invalidate();
            }

            try { currentFileStream.Close(); } catch(IOException) { }
        }
    }

    public void Dispose() {
        lock (locker) {
            if (dispose)
                return;
            dispose = true;
            try { currentFileStream.Close(); } catch(IOException) { }
            if (Image != null)
                Image.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

EDIT1: Based on your comments, I am adding the response here, since teh system does not let me add more text there

  1. Encapsulating functionality like that into a class (set of functions) or a function is good coherency, and numerous times such good practices have performance penalties. You should use it depending on your situation.
  2. I don't think that it is a how streams work, but in case of small files, I can see how it would be the case. To explain this, if you instruct the file buffer size to be say 8K, a file bigger than 8K cannot be cached in memory. So there is no way for the stream to read the whole file without doing real I/O (forget what Windows does behind the screen for this). Also, Bitmap constructor can potentially do synchronous I/O, and there might be problems as you are opening it in async mode. MSDN clearly says that a stream should be only used in one mode (either synchronous or async) throughout the stream objects lifetime. I strongly believe you should close the stream and read from your own buffer that you have already created. The way I would put it is, it works for you now does not mean it will work in a different scenario; you might just be "lucky".
  3. I agree about the volatile keyword, I just practice it that way since sometimes when changing code (say I am getting rid of the lock all together) it saves me from my mistakes
share|improve this answer
    
The difference in structure is that I don't create an entirely new object to load a new file each time. I have a single object (Control) which loads an image based on a user event. In this case, a mouse click or keyboard event could choose a new image to load while an image is already loading. –  Trevor Elliott Jul 18 '12 at 20:40
    
I assumed that using a FileStream that has already finished reading as has reached the End of File would function the same as a MemoryStream in the Bitmap constructor. I will try to measure if it is any faster. –  Trevor Elliott Jul 18 '12 at 20:41
    
Concerning the volatile keyword, I read that it is designed for use when not using lock statements. Since I only touch the disposed member inside a lock statement, I think it is okay. –  Trevor Elliott Jul 18 '12 at 20:43
    
I updated the code sample to my latest code. I was having the odd exception when the same file would try to be read twice, so I added the important FileShare.Read flag to the constructor to fix it. –  Trevor Elliott Jul 18 '12 at 20:49
    
Performance was the same with or without wrapping a MemoryStream. I think once a FileStream has finished reading into memory it basically functions like a MemoryStream. –  Trevor Elliott Jul 18 '12 at 20:56

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