Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is a class X. A method method() in X class throws SomeException.

I wonder which method of handling exceptions is better - more efficient. If it is surrounding try-block method throwing exceptions and all dependencies or keeping dependences outside try-block, but returning from method after failure.

1.

public void test() {
     X x = new X();

     try {
          T temp = tx.method();
          temp.doWhatever();
     }

     catch(SomeException e) { handleException(e); }
}

or

2.

public void test() {
     X x = new X();
     T temp = null;
     try {
          temp = tx.method();
     }

     catch(SomeException e) { 
          handleException(e);
          return;
     }

     temp.doWhatever();
}

Edited: (after your annotations)

What is more I undersand my code like that:

1. tx.method() will throw an exception so the next thing which will be excetuted is catch- block. It doesn't matted that temp is still null because program skips temp.doWhatever(); line and there will be no NullPointerException.

2. Here I use return instruction because I don't want to execute temp.doWhatever() because temp is null

share|improve this question
    
Option 1 looks much clearer to me –  Eric Jul 12 '12 at 17:32
    
(1) Why is one public void test and the other is public static void main? (2) You do realize that in the second block of code, it means temp.doWhatever will not have its exceptions caught? –  notfed Jul 12 '12 at 17:32
    
@notfed: For your question (2), OP didn't say anything about doWhatever throws Exception, though (and we can assume nothing is thrown). –  nhahtdh Jul 12 '12 at 17:33
1  
It depends on context, what you want to communicate, the rest of the method, etc. Neither is more efficient. –  Dave Newton Jul 12 '12 at 17:34
    
number 1 is the best way to do it; it's the way that I handle exceptions. Bear in mind that you really only want to catch your exception if you're going to do something to handle it. otherwise you might as well let your exception bubble up. –  Sam I am Jul 12 '12 at 18:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The second case won't even compile (and it does not even make sense), as temp is not visible outside the try block. In any case, I would go for this:

public void test() {
     X x = new X();

     try {
          T temp = tx.method();
          temp.doWhatever();
     }

     catch(SomeException e) { handleException(e); }
}

Since if initializing temp fails, the rest of the temp operations should not execute.

share|improve this answer
    
"Since if initializing temp fails, the rest of the temp operations should not execute." I agree with you so that's why I placed return in second example. –  squixy Jul 12 '12 at 18:11
    
@squixy: Now your two snippets are equivalent. I would still choose the first one because it's not recommended to have return statements scattered across the method, since it's a bit more difficult to understand how the code will behave. –  Tudor Jul 12 '12 at 19:46

One of the key points of the way exceptions work is that you can use your style number 1: let a block of code execute with the peace of mind that wherever it breaks, the flow will be interrupted and the error handled. So I would always advise the first style.

share|improve this answer

Only the first is possible, as temp is declared inside.

I personally opt for the first, as otherwise one needs to declare before the try: T temp = null.


After correction of question:

Pro first

The first code has less jump instructions and the variable temp is more local, and is without null initialisation.

Also the coding style is more compact, without null initialisation, a possible error point.

Furthermore exceptions should be kept out of view; it easier to read the first version. Exceptions should not interrupt the linear coding and reading processes.

Pro second

It is more clear where the exception can stem from.

share|improve this answer
    
It is now edited. –  squixy Jul 12 '12 at 18:09

It is not good to have more than one return in a method. But thats just to have understandable code. You can avoid returns with booleans and ifs.

I think there is no efficience problem. if a exception occurs at the first statement then the second is not executed. If there is no exception then ... hm... i think there should be no overhead because of the second method. You could inform you how the "assembler" code looks like with try catch :D

In my opinion it is more important to write undestandable code. The compilers nowadays are very good and optimize the most things very good.

share|improve this answer

Option two is bad for extensibility reasons. Suppose later someone decided that test() should be doing something after test.doWhatever(), even if the exceptional case is encountered. They would have to refactor the code to option one at that point. Since there is no cost to using option one from the start, there is no reason they should have to do that.

Further, the design principle of the try/catch block is violated by returning from the catch block, even though the compiler will still accept it. For the catch to be a return point, it should be throwing an exception, since the action is invoked because of an exceptional case.

share|improve this answer

I don't see any difference with the two methods.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no difference to what they do... But this is a coding style question. That's the point. –  Eric Jul 12 '12 at 17:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.