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In hopes of trying to avoid future memory leaks in php programs (drupal modules, etc.) I've been messing around with simple php scripts that leak memory.

Could a php expert help me find what about this script causes the memory usage to continually climb?

Try running it yourself, changing various parameters. The results are interesting. Here it is:

<?php

function memstat() {
  print "current memory usage: ". memory_get_usage() . "\n";
}

function waste_lots_of_memory($iters) {
  $i = 0;
  $object = new StdClass;
  for (;$i < $iters; $i++) {
    $object->{"member_" . $i} = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
    $object->{"membersonly_" . $i} = new StdClass;
    $object->{"onlymember"} = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
  }
  unset($object);
}

function waste_a_little_less_memory($iters) {
  $i = 0;
  $object = new StdClass;
  for (;$i < $iters; $i++) {

    $object->{"member_" . $i} = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
    $object->{"membersonly_" . $i} = new StdClass;
    $object->{"onlymember"} = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);

    unset($object->{"membersonly_". $i});
    unset($object->{"member_" . $i});
    unset($object->{"onlymember"});

  }
  unset($object);
}

memstat();

waste_a_little_less_memory(1000000);

memstat();

waste_lots_of_memory(10000);

memstat();

For me, the output is:

current memory usage: 73308
current memory usage: 74996
current memory usage: 506676

[edited to unset more object members]

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I would try to remove the lines in the for loop on at a time, to isolate the problem. –  Jan Aagaard Jul 17 '09 at 21:34

7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

unset() doesn't free the memory used by a variable. The memory is freed when the "garbage collector" (in quotes since PHP didn't have a real garbage collector before version 5.3.0, just a memory free routine which worked mostly on primitives) sees fit.

Also, technically, you shouldn't need to call unset() since the $object variable is limited to the scope of your function.

Here is a script to demonstrate the difference. I modified your memstat() function to show the memory difference since the last call.

<?php
function memdiff() {
    static $int = null;

    $current = memory_get_usage();

    if ($int === null) {
        $int = $current;
    } else {
        print ($current - $int) . "\n";
        $int = $current;
    }
}

function object_no_unset($iters) {
    $i = 0;
    $object = new StdClass;

    for (;$i < $iters; $i++) {
        $object->{"member_" . $i}= array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
        $object->{"membersonly_" . $i}= new StdClass;
        $object->{"onlymember"}= array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
    }
}

function object_parent_unset($iters) {
    $i = 0;
    $object = new StdClass;

    for (;$i < $iters; $i++) {
        $object->{"member_" . $i}= array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
        $object->{"membersonly_" . $i}= new StdClass;
        $object->{"onlymember"}= array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
    }

    unset ($object);
}

function object_item_unset($iters) {
    $i = 0;
    $object = new StdClass;

    for (;$i < $iters; $i++) {

        $object->{"member_" . $i}= array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
        $object->{"membersonly_" . $i}= new StdClass;
        $object->{"onlymember"}= array("blah blah blha" => 12345);

        unset ($object->{"membersonly_" . $i});
        unset ($object->{"member_" . $i});
        unset ($object->{"onlymember"});
    }
    unset ($object);
}

function array_no_unset($iters) {
    $i = 0;
    $object = array();

    for (;$i < $iters; $i++) {
        $object["member_" . $i] = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
        $object["membersonly_" . $i] = new StdClass;
        $object["onlymember"] = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
    }
}

function array_parent_unset($iters) {
    $i = 0;
    $object = array();

    for (;$i < $iters; $i++) {
        $object["member_" . $i] = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
        $object["membersonly_" . $i] = new StdClass;
        $object["onlymember"] = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
    }
    unset ($object);
}

function array_item_unset($iters) {
    $i = 0;
    $object = array();

    for (;$i < $iters; $i++) {
        $object["member_" . $i] = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);
        $object["membersonly_" . $i] = new StdClass;
        $object["onlymember"] = array("blah blah blha" => 12345);

        unset ($object["membersonly_" . $i]);
        unset ($object["member_" . $i]);
        unset ($object["onlymember"]);
    }
    unset ($object);
}

$iterations = 100000;

memdiff(); // Get initial memory usage

object_item_unset ($iterations);
memdiff();

object_parent_unset ($iterations);
memdiff();

object_no_unset ($iterations);
memdiff();

array_item_unset ($iterations);
memdiff();

array_parent_unset ($iterations);
memdiff();

array_no_unset ($iterations);
memdiff();
?>

If you are using objects, make sure the classes implements __unset() in order to allow unset() to properly clear resources. Try to avoid as much as possible the use of variable structure classes such as stdClass or assigning values to members which are not located in your class template as memory assigned to those are usually not cleared properly.

PHP 5.3.0 and up has a better garbage collector but it is disabled by default. To enable it, you must call gc_enable() once.

share|improve this answer
    
@mjgoins: I edited my post with more information. The default memory collector works best on primitive types. As soon as you start introducing resources and objects to the mix, it starts to fail. –  Andrew Moore Jul 17 '09 at 21:45
    
So the answer is until php 5.3, php cannot run an arbitrarily long job in fixed memory space. Even my function that leaks less memory will slowly run out, although with high memory allocation it would take many days. –  mjgoins Jul 17 '09 at 21:45
    
@mjgoins: I run multiple tasks which may take anywhere from a minute to multiple hours. The trick is to avoid objects (or try to reuse them if you must) and stick with primitives (in your example, you can easily use arrays). –  Andrew Moore Jul 17 '09 at 21:47
1  
@mjgoins: If you are using objects, make sure that the classes implement __unset() to unset resources used by that class. –  Andrew Moore Jul 17 '09 at 21:54
1  
@Andrew Moore: Are you speculating about StdClass or do you know something I don't? Regular classes can also have new, undeclared members assigned. –  troelskn Jul 17 '09 at 22:06

memory_get_usage() "Returns the amount of memory, in bytes, that's currently being allocated to your PHP script."

That's the amount of memory allocated to the process by the OS, not the amount of memory used by assigned variables. PHP does not always release memory back to the OS -- but that memory can still be re-used when new variables are allocated.

Demonstrating this is simple. Change the end of your script to:

memstat();
waste_lots_of_memory(10000);
memstat();
waste_lots_of_memory(10000);
memstat();

Now, if you're correct, and PHP is actually leaking memory, you should see memory useage grow twice. However, here's the actual result:

current memory usage: 88272
current memory usage: 955792
current memory usage: 955808

This is because memory "freed" after the initial invocation of waste_lots_of_memory() is re-used by the second invocation.

In my 5 years with PHP, I've written scripts that have processed millions of objects and gigabytes of data over a period of hours, and scripts that have run for months at a time. PHP's memory management isn't great, but it's not nearly as bad as you're making it out to be.

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This is the correct answer to the question, and deserves many more upvotes than it got. –  IMSoP Sep 21 '13 at 18:33

memory_get_usage reports how much memory php has allocated from the os. It doesn't necessarily match the size of all variables in use. If php has a peak use of memory, it may decide not to return the unused amount of memory right away. In your example, the function waste_a_little_less_memory unsets unused variables over time. So the peak usage is relatively small. The waste_lots_of_memory builds up a lot of variables (=lots of used memory) before deallocating it. So the peak usage is much larger.

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My understanding of memory_get_usage() is that it's output can depend on a wide range of operating system and version factors.

More importantly, unsetting a variable does not instantly free it's memory, deallocate it from the process, and give it back to the operating system (again, characteristics of this operation are operating system dependent).

In short, you probably need a more complicated setup to look at memory leaks.

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I'm not sure about the exact workings of it in PHP, but in some other languages an object containing other objects, when set to null, does not inherently set the other objects to null. It terminates the reference to those objects, but as PHP does not have "garbage collection" in a Java sense, the sub-objects exist in memory until they are removed individually.

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In case anyone comes across this, the process of freeing memory when an object (or other value) has no references is not considered a "garbage collector" in PHP because it is not a separate piece of functionality, but that doesn't mean it doesn't happen. The references to any variable are counted, and unset() etc reduce that count by one; if the count is reduced to zero, the memory is immediately freed within the PHP memory manager, ready to be used by a new variable. –  IMSoP Sep 21 '13 at 18:27

I believe this comment in the User Contributed Notes for unset() tell the story you're seeing in your test code.

I'm not sure I can be of more help than that.

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memory_get_usage() does not returns the immediate memory usage, but stored memory to run the process. IN the case of a huge array unset($array_a) will not release memory but consume more according to the memory_get_usage() in my system...

$array_a="(SOME big array)";
$array_b="";
//copy array_a to array_b
for($line=0; $line<100;$line++){
$array_b[$line]=$array_a[$line];
}

unset($array_a); //having this shows actually a bigger consume
print_r($array_b);

echo memory_get_usage();

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