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Is there a way to rescue all exceptions under a certain namespace?

For example, I want to rescue all of the Errno::* exceptions (Errno::ECONNRESET, Errno::ETIMEDOUT). I can go ahead and list them all out on my exception line, but I was wondering if I can do something like.

begin
  # my code
rescue Errno
  # handle exception
end

The above idea doesn't seem to work, thus is there something similar that can work?

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Did you try rescuing everything, checking for the namespace, and re-raising if it's not? –  Dave Newton Jul 12 '12 at 18:10
    
@dave I was mainly wondering if there's an easier/cleaner way to catch exceptions based on namespace. –  gylaz Jul 12 '12 at 18:38
    
Nope, unless there's something common, as indicated in the answers. –  Dave Newton Jul 12 '12 at 18:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

All the Errno exceptions subclass SystemCallError:

Module Errno is created dynamically to map these operating system errors to Ruby classes, with each error number generating its own subclass of SystemCallError. As the subclass is created in module Errno, its name will start Errno::.

So you could trap SystemCallError and then do a simple name check:

rescue SystemCallError => e
    raise e if(e.class.name.start_with?('Errno::'))
    # do your thing...
end
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All classes under Errno are subclasses of SystemCallError. And all subclasses of SystemCallError are classes under Errno. The 2 sets are identical, so just rescue SystemCallError. This assumes that you're not using an external lib that adds to one and not the other.

Verify the identity of the 2 sets (using active_support):

Errno.constants.map {|name|
  Errno.const_get(name)
}.select{|const|
  Class === const
}.uniq.map(&:to_s).sort ==
    SystemCallError.subclasses.map(&:to_s).sort

This returns true for me.

So, applied to your example:

begin
  # my code
rescue SystemCallError
  # handle exception
end
share|improve this answer
    
"all subclasses of SystemCallError are classes under Errno" does not necessarily hold. All Errno exceptions are documented to be SystemCallErrors but there's no guarantee that all SystemCallErrors will be Errnos. –  mu is too short Jul 12 '12 at 18:31
    
@muistooshort does my verification code not work then? I assume searching ObjectSpace is sufficient for discovering undocumented classes. Unless some built-in ruby lib has adds more subclasses. –  Kelvin Jul 12 '12 at 18:33
    
The problem is the "This returns true for me" part and in particular, the for me. A gem (or even the application itself) could provide a subclass of SystemCallError that isn't an Errno. –  mu is too short Jul 12 '12 at 19:27
    
@mu I'll grant you that a lib can add a new subclass, but it can also add a new error class under Errno that isn't a subclass of SystemCallError. Also, I think the n=1 problem with my assertion is not so serious since the users run the verification code to see what they get. In any case, it's good to make all the points plain so people know the benefits/risks. Sigh. This kind of caveat-upon-caveat is a frequent reality in a dynamic language world. –  Kelvin Jul 12 '12 at 19:45

Here is a more generic solution, in the case you wanted to rescue some Errno types and not others.

Create a custom module to be included by all the error classes we want to rescue

module MyErrnoModule; end

Customize this array to your liking, up to the "each" call.

Errno.constants.map {|name|
  Errno.const_get(name)
}.select{|const|
  Class === const
}.uniq.each {|klass|
  klass.class_eval {
    include MyErrnoModule
  }
}

Test:

begin
  raise Errno::EPERM
rescue MyErrnoModule
  p "rescued #{$!.inspect}"
end

Test result:

"rescued #<Errno::EPERM: Operation not permitted>"

I would guess this performs slightly better than a solution that needs to check the name of the exception.

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