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The BackgroundWorker object allows us to pass a single argument into the DoWorkEventHandler.

// setup/init:
BackgroundWorker endCallWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
endCallWorker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(EndCallWorker_DoWork);
...
endCallWorker.RunWorkerAsync(userName);

// the handler:
private void EndCallWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    string userName = e.Argument as string;
    ...
}

To pass multiple arguments, I must wrap them in an object, like this poor string array:

// setup/init:

BackgroundWorker startCallWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
startCallWorker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(StartCallWorker_DoWork);
...
startCallWorker.RunWorkerAsync(new string[]{userName, targetNumber});


// the handler:
private void StartCallWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    string[] args = e.Argument as string[];
    string userName = args[0];
    string targetNumber = args[1];
}

Is there another object or pattern that allows us pass multiple arguments nicely, or ideally, write our own signature?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 43 down vote accepted

You could use a closure (Lambda):

backgroundWorker.DoWork += (s, e) => MyWorkMethod(userName, targetNumber);

Or with delegate (anonymous method) syntax:

backgroundWorker.DoWork += 
    delegate(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        MyWorkMethod(userName, targetNumber);
    };
share|improve this answer
    
could you elaborate on how this works? (especially the "(s, e)"... why are they declared?) –  Jeff Meatball Yang Jul 17 '09 at 21:40
    
I like this a lot - For my use case, it works great, but more complex apps might have issues, i.e. I need access to the parameter values (username and targetNumber) at setup/init. –  Jeff Meatball Yang Jul 17 '09 at 22:14
1  
Glad to help (and some more text). –  Ben M Jul 17 '09 at 22:40
2  
I think the caveat in this solution is, we loose the ability to populate the Result or Cancel fields in the DoWorkEventArgs e. If you were not planning to use that anyways, that's great. –  Samik R Feb 7 '11 at 23:47
1  
@Samik R couldn't you just do this to retain the result: (s,e) => e.Result = MyWorkMethod(userName,targetNumber); –  Brad Cunningham May 17 '11 at 18:48

What's wrong with using a typed object?

internal class UserArgs
{
    internal string UserName { get; set; }
    internal string TargetNumber { get; set; }
}

var args = new UserArgs() {UserName="Me", TargetNumber="123" };
startCallWorker.RunWorkerAsync(args);
share|improve this answer
    
This is nicer than my string[] array, but still - I don't want to declare another class just to pass arguments into my own function. This happens in a lot of other built-in handlers in .NET - I guess I am looking for a consistent pattern that doesn't pollute my code with useless wrapper classes. –  Jeff Meatball Yang Jul 17 '09 at 22:07
2  
C# 4.0 has tuple which could hold more than one args. Please refer to my answer to this question. –  Peter Long Jun 14 '11 at 11:32

Object can be a list or array or some such. Just make your object a container of some sort, then cast within the BackgroundWorker. You need to make sure you're always passing in the same type though.

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+McAden If the library designers handled two arguments, why not three, four, etc? The solution was to handle one, and that one can be an object of arbitrary complexity. –  DougN Jul 17 '09 at 21:45

Maybe pass a lambda function as your object? Then you'd call it in the DoWork handler.

endCallWorker.RunWorkerAsync(new Action( () => DelegatedCallTarget(userName, targetNumber) ));
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could you show me how I unwrap them in the handler? –  Jeff Meatball Yang Jul 17 '09 at 21:41

instead of a typed object. C# 4.0 provides us with tuple. We could use a tuple to hold multiple args. Then there is no need to declare a new class.

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1  
Thanks for your tip Peter Long - Using a tuple in C# 4.0 is the way to go... I found this link that helped me greatly: thegrayzone.co.uk/blog/2010/07/… –  user1242829 Mar 1 '12 at 14:05

Create a class that holds all your arguments

Class MyClass
{
     private string m_Username = string.Empty;
     private int m_Targetnumber;

     public MyClass(){}

     public string Username
     {
         get { return m_Username; }
         set { m_Username = value; }
     }

     public int TargetNumber
     {
         get { return m_TargetNumber; }
         set { m_TargetNumber = value; }
     }
 }



// setup/init:

BackgroundWorker startCallWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
startCallWorker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(StartCallWorker_DoWork);
...

MyClass thisClass = new MyClass();
thisClass.Username = "abcd";
thisClass.TargetNumber = 1234;
startCallWorker.RunWorkerAsync(thisClass);


// the handler:
private void StartCallWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
     MyClass args = (MyClass)e.Argument;
     string userName = args.Username;
     string targetNumber = args.TargetNumber;
}
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Why not have the "one" object passed be an array of parameters? You only need to cast it back to array inside the method from the object parameter.

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