Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I create a closure that uses a reflected type argument? Targeting .net 3.5

Without reflection I would have

void Main()
{
    int i = 0;
    Action<Foo> doSomething = (foo) => i += foo.GetNumber();
    var myFoo = new Foo();
    myFoo.UseFoo(doSomething);
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}

class Foo
{
    public int GetNumber() { return 4; }
    public void UseFoo(Action<Foo> doSomething)
    {
        doSomething(this);
    }
}

When Foo is a type obtained via reflection from another assembly, how would I set doSomething?

void Main()
{
    Type fooType = GetType("Foo");
    int i = 0;
    object doSomething = // ???;

    var myFoo = Activator.CreateInstance(fooType);
    fooType.GetMethod("UseFoo").Invoke(myFoo, new object[] { doSomething });
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}
share|improve this question
    
I don't understand your question. You want to give an Action<Foo> as argument of UseFoo() using reflection? –  Matías Fidemraizer Jul 12 '12 at 19:00
    
Yes, and I want that action to be a closure that can modify i –  Josh Jul 12 '12 at 19:02
    
Good question. I didn't know what a closure was until today. - The compiler generates a class to encapsulate the variable when it detects a closure, so what you're trying to do (or rather the way you're trying to do it) won't work at run time. I wish I had an answer for you, but thanks for the question! –  Nathan Jul 12 '12 at 19:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I used both DocXcz and Nikola Anusev's answers to get to this

static void Main()
{
    var fooType = typeof(Foo); // get type via any method
    int i = 0;

    Action<object> doSomething = (foo) => i += (int)foo.GetType().GetMethod("GetNumber").Invoke(foo, null);
    var typedDoSomething = (typeof(Program)).GetMethod("DelegateHelper").MakeGenericMethod(fooType).Invoke(null, new object[] { doSomething });

    var myFoo = Activator.CreateInstance(fooType);
    fooType.GetMethod("UseFoo").Invoke(myFoo, new object[] { typedDoSomething });
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}

public static Action<T> DelegateHelper<T>(Action<object> generic)
{
    return x => generic(x);
}

Basically I needed to use a generic helper method to do the conversion of the Action<object> to an Action<T> determined at runtime

share|improve this answer
    
Hats off - this is really clever solution! In cases like this, it is common to accept your own answer - I think you can safely do that. –  Nikola Anusev Jul 12 '12 at 20:33

If you don't have statically linked that assembly containing Foo class at compile time, you are true that you cannot use Foo in the code.

You must use reflection also in the closure:

Action<object> doSomething = 
(foo) => i+= (int)foo.GetType().GetMethod("GetNumber").Invoke(foo, null);

This assumes that Foo's methos UseFoo is something like this and only works with .NET 4.

public void UseFoo(Action<Foo> action)
{
    action(this);
}

Of course, you should enclose whole calling of UseFoo to try..catch block, because anything in reflection is not guaranteed.

Update: This works only in .NET 4, where Action can be passed as Action assumed by the UseFoo method.

share|improve this answer
    
In my case, the assembly containing Foo cannot be modified, and cannot be referenced at compile-time. It can only be loaded at run-time. –  Josh Jul 12 '12 at 19:09
    
Ha I missed that. Now this should help you :) –  DocXcz Jul 12 '12 at 19:19
    
Nice, that works for my case. Makes me wonder about if Foo was a struct, but that may be a different question later. –  Josh Jul 12 '12 at 19:34
    
Since doSomething is of type Action<object>, how is UseFoo() going to accept it as an argument since it's expecting Action<Foo>, not Action<object>? –  Rafael Goodman Jul 12 '12 at 19:35
2  
@Josh Now, I see that you want this to work in .NET 3.5 - in that case, DocXcz's code wont't work, since it relies on Action<T> being contravariant. The contravariance is available starting with .NET 4.0. –  Nikola Anusev Jul 12 '12 at 19:42

I am convinced that it is impossible to do exactly what you want on .NET 3.5.

Only way that comes close does not make use of lambdas, but plain old methods. Essentially, you would have your actions defined in a class similar to the following:

public class FooActionMethods<TFoo>
{
    public static void DoSomething(TFoo foo)
    {
        int i = 0;
        int number = (int)typeof(TFoo).GetMethod("GetNumber").Invoke(foo, null);
        Console.WriteLine(i + number);
    }
}

Then, you could invoke, for example, DoSomething method:

Type fooType = // somehow, we get the type from other assembly
object fooInstance = Activator.CreateInstance(fooType);  

Type fooActionType = typeof(Action<>).MakeGenericType(fooType);
Type fooActionMethodsType = typeof(FooActionMethods<>).MakeGenericType(fooType);

Delegate action = Delegate.CreateDelegate(fooActionType, fooActionMethodsType, "DoSomething");

fooType.GetMethod("UseFoo").Invoke(fooInstance, new object[] { action });

As the whole FooActionMethod class is generic, we can make use of reflection (MakeGenericType) and create the closed FooActionMethod with the exact type of Foo. Since we have no information about TFoo at compile time, it is only possible to interact with its instances via reflection. To simplify these interactions, check out the SO question that dealt with some libraries that would simplify working with reflection.

Other than that, I think there is nothing better you could do. Thanks for the good question - makes for an excellent puzzle! :)

Just as a sidenote, I was also trying to solve this by using expression trees to create lambda expression dynamically. I was not able to find a way to include closures with Expression trees. Otherwise, that method would work fine as well.

share|improve this answer

A closure, in C#, is something generated by the compiler. If you wanted the same code generated for you reflected type, you'd have to generate the code manually.

share|improve this answer

If foo implements a suitable interface you can have the Action work on this interface.

If not, you need to either use reflection in your delegate (easier) or compile a delegate at runtime using the expression API (more work, max. performance).

As the C# compiler creates the closure to i you need to keep doing that:

Action<int> incrementI = inc => i += inc;

You can now use increment i in your compiled delegate to increment i.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.