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I am trying to create a form with two drop down menus which users need to choose from, which they they will submit and depending on the selection from the two drop down menus they will be redirected to a web page, I have managed to make something work with a if statement but I'm trying to use a more cleaner way of doing it. I tried to use a case statement but cant get it to work.

Please bare in mind I am still green to JavaScript

Here is what I have done till now:

           <form>
 <p> Type of Terrain: </p>

  <select id="type">
    <option value="0" id="Select">Select</option>
    <option value="1" id="Street_Park">Street/Park</option>
    <option value="2" id="Dirt">Dirt</option>
    <option value="3" id="Racing">Racing</option>
    </select>

    <p>Body Height</p>
    <select id="height">
    <option value="0" id="Select">Select</option>
    <option value="1" id="5ft">4ft</option>
    <option value="2" id="5.5ft">4.25ft</option>
    <option value="3" id="5.5ft">4.50ft</option>
    <option value="4" id="6ft">4.75ft</option>
    <option value="5" id="5ft">5ft</option>
    <option value="6" id="5.5ft">5.25ft</option>
    <option value="7" id="6ft">5.50ft</option>
    <option value="8" id="5ft">5.75ft</option>
    <option value="9" id="5.5ft">6ft</option>
    <option value="10" id="6ft">6.25ft</option>
    </select>

    <br /><br />

    <input  onclick="goToPage();"  type="button" value="Submit" />

    </form>

<script type="text/javascript">

function goToPage()
{
  var type = document.getElementById("type").value;
  var height = document.getElementById("height").value;

  switch ("type" && "height"){

    case type == 1 && height == 1 :

    window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/About.html"
    Break;

    case type == 1 && height == 2 :

    window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/Footage.html"
    Break;



  }
}
</script>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Your switch statement syntax is a bit off - usage is like this:

switch (type){

  case "1":

    window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/About.html"
    break;

  case "2" :

    window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/Footage.html"
    break;
}

where you want to make a choice between the value of the expression inside the switch() statement. So say I switch(height) each 'case' statement would need to be a possible value of that 'height' variable, such as case "20":.

When you're trying to make logical decisions with multiple conditions, use an 'if/else if' statement so I suggest you just do:

if(type == "1" && height == "1"){

   window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/About.html"
}
else if(type == "1" && height == "2"){

   window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/Footage.html"
}

Instead of the switch. I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help, yes i first though of using an if statement but seeing as i have 40 possible selections i wanted to try and use a cleaner way of coding the form. do u have any idea of a better way i can use this form without an if statement so it could be cleaner Thanks Again –  user1515230 Jul 13 '12 at 14:03

Couple things wrong with your use of switch and case:

switch is for evaluating a single expression and each case considered needs to be for the result of the expression analyzed.

Since you're looking at two variables, if/else if would probably be cleaner:

if (type==1 && height==1) { window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/About.html"; }
else if (type==1 && height==2) { window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/Footage.html"; }

That said, if you still want to use switch, you can, but you'll have to nest one within another. I don't recommend this as it's overly verbose but include an example here to help you understand your options.

switch (type) {
    case 1:
        switch (height) {
            case 1:
                window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/About.html";
            break;
            case 2:
                window.location = "http://www.maltabmx.com/Footage.html";
            break;
        }
    break;
    // other options...
    default:
        alert("You must select a type.");
    break;
}

Added the following after reading the response comment:

Since you have so many combinations, you could organize them using a combination of if/else if/else and switch statements. Since there are a large number of links, it's still going to be a chunk of code, but it would at least look a little cleaner.

var targetURL;
if (type==0) {
    switch (height) {
        case 1: targetURL = "http://www.maltabmx.com/About.html";
        case 2: targetURL = "http://www.maltabmx.com/Footage.html";
        /* and so on... */
    }
} else if (type==1) {
    switch (height) {
        case 1: targetURL = "...";
        case 2: targetURL = "...";
        /* etc... */
    }
} else if (type==2) {
    switch (height) {
        case 1: targetURL = "...";
        case 2: targetURL = "...";
        /* etc... */
    }
} else {
    switch (height) {
        case 1: targetURL = "...";
        case 2: targetURL = "...";
        /* etc... */
    }
}
targetURL ? window.location.href = targetURL : alert("Please choose a height.");

Since you mentioned you're still green to javascript, I'm going to go ahead and explain a couple other parts of my added example code. My apologies if I go over something you already know.

From your HTML, it looks like type will always have a value, so rather than ending the if/else if chunk with else if (type==3), I just use else since if type isn't 0, 1, or 2, it must be 3. It's generally good practice with if/else (if) statements to have a catch-all at the end, so your script always does something, even if the ending else is just to say something went wrong. That way the user doesn't sit there wondering if something's supposed to happen. You can do the same within a switch statement by specifying a default after your cases.

I also used a variable called targetURL instead of using window.location on every line where case is used. When a variable is initialized without a value like I did ("var targetURL;"), the value becomes false. At the end of the script, I have some terse code that evaluates whether targetURL is true or not. If it's not true, it displays the alert to choose a height. In javascript, a variable will return as true as long as its value isn't false or 0.

(Please note that's boolean false and not the string "false"; var targetURL = "false"; with the quotes will return true!)

I did that so you don't have to type window.location 40 times and can put error handling (for if height somehow didn't have a value) in one place rather than four.

And on that note, just to familiarize you with the terse syntax I just discussed:

targetURL ? window.location.href = targetURL : alert("Please choose a height.");

...is the equivalent of:

if (targetURL) {
    window.location.href = targetURL;
} else {
    alert("Please choose a height.");
}

You can make simple if/else evaluations more concise that way.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help, yes i first though of using an if statement but seeing as i have 40 possible selections i wanted to try and use a cleaner way of coding the form. do u have any idea of a better way i can use this form without an if statement so it could be cleaner Thanks Again –  user1515230 Jul 13 '12 at 14:02
    
You're welcome. I edited my existing response to include some more code examples and explanations to address this issue. Short version: You can use a combination of if/else and switch to make the code look cleaner. –  dentaku Jul 16 '12 at 21:13

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