Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have changes in my working directory that I'm trying to discard (reset to the current indexed version of the files), however, git checkout -- <file> will not discard the changes. I've attempted to manually remove the files (rm -r files) then run git checkout -- ., which displays the files as modified again.

$ git checkout -- .
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   files/Hulk.png
#   modified:   files/Hulk_2.png
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

Running git diff shows the files are modified...

diff --git a/files/Hulk.png b/files/Hulk.png
index 1c256cb..1d37fe0 100644
Binary files a/files/Hulk.png and b/files/Hulk.png differ
diff --git a/files/Hulk_2.png b/files/Hulk_2.png
index 1c256cb..0717199 100644
Binary files a/files/Hulk_2.png and b/files/Hulk_2.png differ

NOTE: Some people have said to run git checkout ., however this will achieve the same result as git checkout -- .. The -- is just a notation used in the git checkout command to differentiate treeish/commit points from files/paths.

OS: OSX 10.6 Git: 1.7.10.2

share|improve this question
    
Does git reset --hard work? –  vergenzt Jul 12 '12 at 20:58
    
@vergenzt, no... doesn't work. I discovered the problem. I'm working with a repo that appears to have multiple files with the same names and different cases. Since I'm on an OSX workstation, which is case-insensitive, the files appeared to change, but not really. That's why I can't reset them nor can I commit the "change". I have to actually rename the files on a case sensitive OS and commit the result. –  Highway of Life Jul 12 '12 at 21:08
    
If you've come up with an answer, please add that answer and mark it as accepted. –  swatkins Jul 12 '12 at 21:16
    
@swatkins I haven't yet, I'm still working on it. –  Highway of Life Jul 12 '12 at 21:22
    
Sweet! Good luck getting that completed! –  swatkins Jul 13 '12 at 14:16

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The cause for this was due to multiple files with the same name but different cases. In OSX, which is case-insensitive, doesn't like multiple files with the same name but different cases. It views them as the same file. To fix this, I ran git mv (or just mv) to a temporary filename, added the temp files, which allowed git to remove the old/incorrectly named versions, then a second commit to name them back. This could also be corrected on a filesystem which allows different files with the same name to be different cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Glad you fixed it. :) –  vergenzt Jul 13 '12 at 12:30
    
Thanks for this! It helped me get past an extremely frustrating bug in CocoaPods –  nathan.f77 Aug 3 at 3:50

Based on your comments, you must configure your repository to be case sensitive:

git config core.ignorecase false

This allows git to track both files (although the file system only shows one, which is enormously confusing). Here are replication steps to demonstrate what's happening, when git is correctly tracking case sensitivity:

git init /tmp/test && cd /tmp/test
git config core.ignorecase false
echo test>test && git add test && git commit -m "lowercase t"
mv test Test

Now git status shows no differences to test:

git status -s
 ?? Test

Commit Test and use git ls-files to see what we're now tracking:

git add Test && git commit -m "uppercase T"
git ls-files
 Test
 test

What does ls report? Why, just 'Test', naturally:

ls
 Test

Finally, what happens when we modify Test?

echo garbage>Test
git status -s
 M Test
 M test

What a mess.

share|improve this answer

Use . instead of --

git checkout .
share|improve this answer
    
Why? -- Is just a command to donate differences between commits and files. You'll get the exact same result using either. And I did. –  Highway of Life Jul 12 '12 at 19:15
    
@HighwayofLife Its so weird that it does not work for you –  bluesman Jul 12 '12 at 20:34
    
git checkout -- . and git checkout . do the same thing, it's not going to either work better or worse. However, I discovered the reason why I'm experiencing this anomaly: OSX is case insensitive, there are files with the same names, but different cases. I'll post an answer the moment I come upon a solution. (core.ignorecase = true/false didn't work) –  Highway of Life Jul 12 '12 at 20:55

Did you try

git config --global core.autocrlf false

or

git config --global core.filemode false
share|improve this answer

If you want to discard all changes you've made, just use

git checkout .
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, didn't see bluesman's answer –  jugglinghobo Jul 12 '12 at 19:14
    
That's what I did, see my question. Note that git checkout -- . and git checkout . will do the same thing. –  Highway of Life Jul 12 '12 at 19:16

I faced the same problem. I found that the two problematic files had DOS line ending characters. I did this to fix the problem.

1- use a different clone to change the line ending to UNIX 2- blow away the clone where the problem was appearing and re clone it.

share|improve this answer

when you delete file from filesystem using "rm -r file" you don't delete it from repository. Yo need do de same in git using "git rm "

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not trying to delete the files from the repository, I'm trying to reset them to the current status of the index. Please re-read the question. :) –  Highway of Life Jul 12 '12 at 19:22

I used git checkout -- .

Also git checkout .

== the same thing as the op said both worked Mac OSX 10.7 and Linux, worked on both

with git version 1.7.7.5 (Apple Git-26) and git 1.7.1 compiled

Try a different repo and see if you get the same results. Maybe a command bug in the git version?

share|improve this answer
    
I discovered the problem. I'm working with a repo that appears to have multiple files with the same names and different cases. Since I'm on an OSX workstation, which is case-insensitive, the files appeared to change, but not really. That's why I can't reset them nor can I commit the "change". I have to actually rename the files on a case sensitive OS and commit the result. –  Highway of Life Jul 12 '12 at 21:09
    
Seems simple enough, but what a weird issue. (Good to know) –  topdown Jul 12 '12 at 21:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.