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I am trying to output the index of makeList[start] to makeList[end]. I have all the correct start and end values, which are about 11 pairs total. However, I dont get the correct output because it doesn't print out all the possible output. Why is that happening?

def searchPFAM(fname):
   with open(fname,'rb') as f:
       root = etree.parse(f)
       for lcn in root.xpath("/protein/match[@dbname='PFAM']/lcn"):
          try:
             start = int(lcn.get("start"))
             end = int(lcn.get("end"))
             yield start, end
          except (TypeError , ValueError) as e:
             pass 

uniprotID ='Q14591'

def createRef():
    fileInput = open(uniprotID +'.txt','r')
    readAA = fileInput.read()
    store_value = (readAA.partition('\n'))
    aaSequence = store_value[2].replace('\n', '')
    makeList = list(aaSequence)
    return makeList

makeList = createRef()

for start, end in searchPFAM(fname):
    print start, end  
    if start <= end:
        with open('newfile.txt','w') as fileinput:
            while start <= end:
                result = makeList[start]
                fileinput.write(result)
                start += 1
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just a guess, but you probably want:

with open('newfile.txt','w') as fileinput:
    for start, end in searchPFAM(fname):
        print start, end  
        if start <= end:
            while start <= end:
                result = makeList[start]
                fileinput.write(result)
                start += 1

Your old version only writes 1 start/end loop to the file, closes it and then opens a newfile (with the same name as the old one), writes 1 start/end loop, closes the file ... In other words, you're re-writing the file with each loop iteration.

share|improve this answer
    
this works thanks –  Chad D Jul 12 '12 at 19:58
2  
No problem. Glad to help. Sometimes these simple things are sitting there staring you in the face and they're so hard to see/track. Good luck. –  mgilson Jul 12 '12 at 19:59

Most common reason: You need to flush the output file before the script terminates.

snippet from above:

with open('newfile.txt','w') as fileinput:
        while start <= end:
            result = makeList[start]
            fileinput.write(result)
            start += 1
fileinput.flush()
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3  
He's using with so the file should automagically close (and get flushed) when that block is exited –  Levon Jul 12 '12 at 19:52
    
@Levon and it does... fileinput strangely remains in scope, but is in fact a closed fileobj, so any operations fail –  Jon Clements Jul 12 '12 at 19:55
    
I got the error message when i put flush() in saying: ValueError: I/O operation on closed file –  Chad D Jul 12 '12 at 19:57
    
@Levon so right duh. @ChadD It does stay in scope as the with clause does not limit the "new" var to the with scope just as python if and for syntaxes don't –  Phil Cooper Jul 12 '12 at 19:58
    
@PhilCooper I don't really get what do you mean? how do i fix that btw? –  Chad D Jul 12 '12 at 20:55

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