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So I am trying to figure out why a program is compiling the way it is, hopefully you guys can explain it for me.

class Vehicle{
   public void drive() throws Exception{
     System.out.println("Vehicle running");
   }
}

class Car extends Vehicle{
   public void drive(){
      System.out.println("Car Running");
   }

   public static void main(String[] args){
      Vehicle v = new Car();
      Car c = new Car();
      Vehicle c2 = (Vehicle) v;

      c.drive();
      try {
          v.drive();
      } catch (Exception e) {
          e.printStackTrace();
      } //try v.drive()

      try {
          c2.drive();
      } catch (Exception e) {
          e.printStackTrace();
      } //try c2.drive()
   }
}

So the output for the above program is going to be

Car Running
Car Running
Car Running

My question is, why do I have to do a try/catch block to call drive() method for the v and c2 objects but not the c? They are all instance of Car so what's happening here?

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You told the compiler to forget that v and c2 are actually Car objects, and only remember that they're Vehicle objects. What did you expect? –  Louis Wasserman Jul 12 '12 at 19:52
    
Interestingly, the opposite scenario would not compile (Car#drive() with a throws if Vehicle#drive() was not declared to throw something). –  assylias Jul 12 '12 at 19:56
    
I get what you're saying but if v and c2 are not Car objects, why is the output still say "Car Running" when I call the drive() method for v and c2? –  whoadiz Jul 12 '12 at 20:02
    
@whoadiz as i mentioned in my edited answer, v and c2 ARE Car objects. It's just that the compiler doesn't know that at compile time. –  Sam I am Jul 12 '12 at 20:06
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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Vehicle has a drive() method that throws an exception.

Car overrides the Vehicle's Drive() method with it's own Drive() method which does not throw an exception.

The reason you get the output that you do is because even though Vehicle v is of type car, the compiler doesn't know that fact at compile time, so when you call v.drive() the compiler doesn't know that you're calling Car's drive method.

Let's say that you instantiated v in the following way:

Vehicle v;
if(rand(0,1) == 1)
    v = new Car();
else
    v = new Vehicle();

You wouldn't know whether or not v is a car when you compile. You wouldn't know until you run the program.

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So then shouldn't the input come out as Car Running //from c Vehicle Running //from v Vehicle Running //from c2 –  whoadiz Jul 12 '12 at 19:52
    
@whoadiz I've edited my post. admittedly, this problem makes me feel as though there is a problem with inheritance in java, since car's drive method doesn't actually have the same interface as vehicle's drive method. I also think that the whole Java throws Paradigm is silly in the first place. –  Sam I am Jul 12 '12 at 20:04
    
Thanks for the explanation. So if I am understanding this correctly, because of the way I instantiated v and c2 the compiler will try and call the Vehicle's drive method first which is why I have to do the try/catch but when it comes time to actually run the drive method it will use Car's drive method that results in the "Car Running". –  whoadiz Jul 12 '12 at 20:10
    
@whoadiz the compiler won't call any methods. the methods won't get called until runtime, but the compiler sees something that it doesn't like, and tells you that you have an error. –  Sam I am Jul 12 '12 at 20:13
    
@whoadiz you see, the compiler doesn't process your code like a human would. It doesn't traverse every path of your code and say "of course, there's no way for v to be anything but a car" but it sees that v is a vehicle and assumes that it will use vehicle's methods. –  Sam I am Jul 12 '12 at 20:16
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Overridden methods can be more specific about what they return and throw. They can use subclasses of returning objects and exceptions, or omit exception declared in parent's method signature. When you call ((Vehicle)new Car()).drive() then the child's implementation is executed, but the parent's method signature is used at compile time and that forces you to catch exceptions defined in Vehicle.

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We have:

  Vehicle v = new Car();
  Car c = new Car();
  Vehicle c2 = (Vehicle) v;

At this point, v and c2 are Vehicle. This means that you are calling public void drive() throws Exception of Vehicle. That's why you need a try/catch for those methods but not for c.drive() (because that method does not throw an Exception).

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Other answers have explained the over-ridden method; however, there's another issue. You said that:

They are all instance of Car so what's happening here?

But to the compiler, they are not all instances of Car - the compiler will look at the type of the variables:

  Vehicle v = new Car();
  Car c = new Car();
  Vehicle c2 = (Vehicle) v;

At compile time, v is treated as a Vehicle, c as a Car, and the exceptions will be handled accordingly. At runtime, the JVM knows that v actually contains a Car, but that's different.

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