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private double value;
public synchronized void setValue(double d){
    this.value=value;
}
public double getValue(){
    return this.value;
}

In the above example is there any point in making the getter synchronized?

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@Mob no I mean the getter –  DD. Jul 12 '12 at 19:54
    
making the double field volatile would be satisfying if you are using Java 1.5 or bigger and use only set and get (setValue does not have to be synchronized then). See java.util.concurrent.atomic.Atomic* classes and the already cited Java Concurrency in Practice. –  s106mo Jul 12 '12 at 20:04
    
@s106mo This has worked on all Java versions. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 12 '12 at 20:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted

I think its best to cite Java Concurrency in Practice here:

It is a common mistake to assume that synchronization needs to be used only when writing to shared variables; this is simply not true.

For each mutable state variable that may be accessed by more than one thread, all accesses to that variable must be performed with the same lock held. In this case, we say that the variable is guarded by that lock.

In the absence of synchronization, the compiler, processor, and runtime can do some downright weird things to the order in which operations appear to execute. Attempts to reason about the order in which memory actions "must" happen in insufflciently synchronized multithreaded programs will almost certainly be incorrect.

Normally, you don't have to be so careful with primitives, so if this would be an int or a boolean it might be that:

When a thread reads a variable without synchronization, it may see a stale value, but at least it sees a value that was actually placed there by some thread rather than some random value.

This, however, is not true for 64-bit operations, for instance on long or double if they are not declared volatile:

The Java Memory Model requires fetch and store operations to be atomic, but for nonvolatile long and double variables, the JVM is permitted to treat a 64-bit read or write as two separate 32-bit operations. If the reads and writes occur in different threads, it is therefore possible to read a nonvolatile long and get back the high 32 bits of one value and the low 32 bits of another.

Thus, even if you don't care about stale values, it is not safe to use shared mutable long and double variables in multithreaded programs unless they are declared volatile or guarded by a lock.

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1  
To elaborate, if one wants to obtain the most recent version of value in a multi-threaded application, both the getter and setter should be synchronized. If, for some really really weird reason, you don't care about getting the latest version, and synchronization is eating up too much time (this scenario is unlikely!) I think you an get away with not synchronizing the getter. Except in this case - a double is 64 bits so it should always be synchronized. –  user949300 Jul 12 '12 at 19:59
1  
@user949300 Not synchronizing the getter is simply incorrect. You may never, ever observe a change to the var. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 12 '12 at 20:01
2  
"In the absence of synchronization, the compiler, processor, and runtime can do some downright weird things to the order in which operations appear to execute" - see example 17.4.5-1 (Happens-before Consistency) in docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/… –  Martin Wilson Jul 12 '12 at 20:16
2  
@gasan Whether the JVM is 32-bit or 64-bit is irrelevant because we're discussing this at the specification level. The JLS specifies long and double operations as non-atomic. But, all that is quite irrelevant with the new Memory Model definition where it is clear that there is no deal without proper happens-before ordering. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 12 '12 at 20:21
1  
@platzhirsch it seems that you're also right because of (from JLS): If an action x synchronizes-with a following action y, then we also have hb(x, y). –  dhblah Jul 13 '12 at 8:00

Let me show you by example what is a legal way for a JIT to compile your code. You write:

while (myBean.getValue() > 1.0) {
  // perform some action
  Thread.sleep(1);
}

JIT compiles:

if (myBean.getValue() > 1.0) 
  while (true) {
    // perform some action
    Thread.sleep(1);
  }

In just slightly different scenarios even the Java compiler could prouduce similar bytecode (it would only have to eliminate the possibility of dynamic dispatch to a different getValue). This is a textbook example of hoisting.

Why is this legal? The compiler has the right to assume that the result of myBean.getValue() can never change while executing above code. Without synchronized it is allowed to ignore any actions by other threads.

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Is there any official source saying that w/o synchronized such permutations are possible and that synchronized precludes them to happen? –  dhblah Jul 12 '12 at 20:40
    
@gasan Sure, it's the JLS. It won't point out any particular transformation, but this follows from the semantics of the Java Memory Model. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 12 '12 at 20:41
    
That's possibly true, but this permutation looks a bit frightening and I think it would be explicitly mentioned in the documentation. –  dhblah Jul 12 '12 at 20:46
1  
@gasan Everyday you are executing code where things exactly like this (some even more frightening) happen all the time. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 12 '12 at 20:49
    
at least I hope such an "optimisation" won't happen if inner loop changes value a check is made on. –  dhblah Jul 12 '12 at 21:00

The reason here is to guard against any other thread updating the value when a thread is reading and thus avoid performing any action on stale value.

Here get method will acquire intrinsic lock on "this" and thus any other thread which might attempt to set/update using setter method will have to wait to acquire lock on "this" to enter the setter method which is already acquired by thread performing get.

This is why its recommended to follow the practice of using same lock when performing any operation on a mutable state.

Making the field volatile will work here as there are no compound statements.


It is important to note that synchronized methods use intrinsic lock which is "this". So get and set both being synchronized means any thread entering the method will have to acquire lock on this.


When performing non atomic 64 bit operations special consideration should be taken. Excerpts from Java Concurrency In Practice could be of help here to understand the situation -

"The Java Memory Model requires fetch and store operations to be atomic, but for non-volatile long and double variables, the JVM is permitted to treat a 64 bit read or write as two separate 32 bit operations. If the reads and writes occur in different threads, it is therefore possible to read a non-volatile long and get back the high 32 bits of one value and the low 32 bits of another. Thus, even if you don't care about stale values, it is not safe to use shared mutable long and double variables in multi-threaded programs unless they are declared volatile or guarded by a lock."

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