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I'm having problems getting my command-line arguments to work properly. The arguments appear to fail when the argc is higher than 3 and after that you can only get them to work if you write -fwhatever and not -f whatever as it should be. -t also copies the value of -o.

int main(int argc,char **argv)
{
    int c;

    /* Are we in root? */

    if(geteuid() !=0)
        {
            printf("Root access is required to run this program. \n");

            exit(0);        
        }   

    /* How do we use the program */

    if ((argc < 6) || (argc > 8))
        {
            usage(argv[0]);

            exit (0);
        } 

    while (1)
        {
            static struct option long_options[] =
                {
                    /* Options */
                {"send",       no_argument,       0, 's'},
                {"recieve",    no_argument,       0, 'r'},
                {"file",       required_argument, 0, 'f'},
                {"data",       required_argument, 0, 'd'},
                {"destip",     required_argument, 0, 'i'},
                {"destport",   required_argument, 0, 'p'},
                {"sourceip",   required_argument, 0, 'o'},
                {"sourceport", required_argument, 0, 't'},
                {0, 0, 0, 0}
                };

               int option_index = 0;

               c = getopt_long (argc, argv, "srf:d:i:p:o:t:",
                            long_options, &option_index);

                          /* Detect the end of the options. */
               if (c == -1)
                 break;

               switch (c)
                 {
                 case 0:
                   /* If this option set a flag, do nothing else now. */
                   if (long_options[option_index].flag != 0)
                 break;
                   printf ("option %s", long_options[option_index].name);
                   if (optarg)
                 printf (" with arg %s", optarg);
                   printf ("\n");
                   break;

                 case 's':
                   puts ("option -s\n");
                   break;

                 case 'r':
                   puts ("option -r\n");
                   break;

                 case 'f':
                   printf ("option -f with value `%s'\n", optarg);
                   break;

                 case 'd':
                   printf ("option -d with value `%s'\n", optarg);
                   break;

                 case 'i':
                   printf ("option -i with value `%s'\n", optarg);
                   break;

                 case 'p':
                   printf ("option -p with value `%s'\n", optarg);
                   break;

                 case 'o': 
                   printf ("option -o with value `%s'\n", optarg);

                 case 't': 
                   printf ("option -t with value `%s'\n", optarg);


                 case '?':
                   /* Error message printed */
                   break;

                 default:
                   abort ();
                 }
             }

               /* Print any remaining command line arguments (not options). */
            if (optind < argc)
        {
            printf ("non-option ARGV-elements: ");
            while (optind < argc)
            printf ("%s ", argv[optind++]);
            putchar ('\n');
        }

        getchar ();
        exit (0);

}

There's obviously something horribly wrong here, but it can't seem to find it.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Regarding the -o copied to -t, you forgot to put a break; at the end of the case.

Also, I would have removed the argc checking. Let getopt do its magic. You can check at the end of parsing if all mandatory options were set. You can also check for unknown arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
how many times i used to tear my hair out for same kind of problems! compilers should stop compiling this stuff. or a second switch construct. which will compile without breaks at each case. but switch proper will not compile. – Aftnix Jul 12 '12 at 21:49
    
Thanks @eyalm! it's so easy to miss stuff like that. Any suggestions on what the best way of checking for mandatory options? – youjustreadthis Jul 14 '12 at 13:35
    
Just set all the option variables to NULL. After running getopt, make sure they were all initialized. – eyalm Jul 14 '12 at 15:40

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