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I have several DIV's displayed as inline-blocks; and they seem to be getting spacing automatically applied in between them from the browser. They have margin/padding set to 0. Is there a way to correct this without using negative margins?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

Sam, that space you're seeing is actually whitespace. That's why removing the paddings and margins does nothing. Let me explain. When you have this:

HTML

<div>
    a
    a
    a
    a
</div>

this is how it's rendered:

a a a a

...right?

So, if you have this:

<div>
    <div style="display:inline-block"></div>
    <div style="display:inline-block"></div>
    <div style="display:inline-block"></div>
</div>

...you'll get the same thing:

block [space] block [space] block

Now... there are many different solutions to this problem. I believe the most common is commenting out the whitespace in the html:

   <div>
        <div style="display:inline-block"></div><!--
        --><div style="display:inline-block"></div><!--
        --><div style="display:inline-block"></div>
   </div>

I don't like it though - I prefer keeping the html as clean as possible. My preferred way is to set the parent's font-size to 0, and then set back the desired font-size on the inline-blocks themselves. Like so:

div {
    font-size: 0; /* removes the whitespace */
}

div div {
    display: inline-block;
    font-size: 14px;
}
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+1 - both are good solutions. – Wex Jul 12 '12 at 22:03

You don't need to use negative margins to offset the original margins.

Instead you can override them with the following:

* { margin:0; }

or:

.div { margin:0; }

if it's element specific.

EDIT:

It appears the problem may be a result of unintended whitespace. For instance:

<div style="display:inline-block">
    ...
</div>
<div style="display:inline-block">
    ...
</div>

There exists white space between the two dividers and the browser will print the white space as a result. To fix this, you'll need to change it to:

<div style="display:inline-block">
    ...
</div><div style="display:inline-block">
    ...
</div>

Enjoy and good luck!

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what does * do? – Sam Jul 12 '12 at 20:14
    
* is a wildcard character in CSS which represents all elements in a given document. – Daniel Li Jul 12 '12 at 20:15
    
This doesn't seem to solve my margins issue. Perhaps "margins" is the wrong term. I have several divs next to each other and the browser is defaulting spacing between them; even though they are set to magin 0 and padding 0. – Sam Jul 12 '12 at 20:19
    
Answer updated. – Daniel Li Jul 12 '12 at 20:22

Inline-block is originally a IE6 hack

This is what its used for:

  • To fix the IE6 double-margin bug on floated elements
  • To place multiple block-like elements on the same horizontal line without floating them(if you can't float 'exceptional cases)
  • To allow an inline element to have width and/or height while still remaining inline
  • To allow an inline element to have padding or margins

So if you wanna have multiple divs beside eachother please use float, its gonna solve many of your css problems that inline-block can cause, especially cross browser issues

More about inline-block here arcticle 9.2.4

Best regards SP

please comment if disagree

share|improve this answer
    
inline-block is not a hack, it is to allow elements to flow as if they were part of the text. Your advice about using float is bad. Unnecessary use of float causes maintainability issues, will likely mean your site fails to be responsive to different screen/window sizes, and is poor design. – user2511031 May 17 '15 at 1:09
    
Inline-block has some issues to so its a loose loose, and i agree that float is not the ideal solution but you dont have inline-block in IE6 so thats why i would go for float as fallback. – Simon Pertersen May 18 '15 at 11:21

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