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I have a number of classes, please allow me to introduce them and then ask my question at the end:

I have a container class which contains two objects in a composite relationship:

public class Container{

    A a;
    B b;

    public someMethod(){
        a.getC().myMethod(b);
    }
}

A and B are superclasses (or Interfaces), with subtypes that can also be the type held in the composite relationship.

A contains a member of (interface) type C:

public class A{
   C c;
}


public interface C{
    public void myMethod(B b);
}

public class D implements C{
    public void myMethod(B b){
        //This code will modify the state of object b, in class Container.
        b.changeState();
    }
}

public class E implements C{
    public void myMethod(B b){
        //This code will modify the state of object b, in class Container.
        b.changeState();
    }
}

My problem is that I wish to modify the state of object b from a method starting in the container class, which eventually calls code down the hierarchy, to classes D and E- calling myMethod() via dynamic binding. I want to do this because I am going to use polymorphism to run the correct myMethod() (depending on whether the type of object is D or E) and I wish to do this, rather than write IF statements.

So my problem is that it seems very bad continually passing the instance of object b down the class hierarchy to myMethod, so that I can run b-specific code to modify the state of b. Is there anything else I can do to modify b from d and e (collectively known as c)?

I can get this to work using just interfaces but without using generics- but when I added generics i had problems with types and that made me start to think if my whole design was flawed?

EDIT: I could probably do this easily just by using IF statements- but I wanted an elegant solution using polymorphism of classes D and E.

share|improve this question
    
I suspect you forgot to pass an instance of B to D's myMethod() –  Nicola Musatti Jul 12 '12 at 20:27
    
My intuition is that what you are struggling with is an indication of bad design. Does it really take a deep object hierarchy to do what you want? And what justification does a high-level object have to even know about something deeper down? –  Jochen Jul 12 '12 at 20:29
    
So what's wrong with the code you're currently using? It's a good OOP design, and you're not really "passing down" the b's. –  Hans Z Jul 12 '12 at 20:32
    
You could create a method in A public void myMethod(B b) that calls C.myMethod(b);so on an upper level, Container just has to do a.myMethod(b); –  Hans Z Jul 12 '12 at 20:35
    
@Hans really? I was always told passing down like this is not good? Would you bother using generics for the interface aspects? Im not really retrieving any objects, just modifying state of objects. –  user997112 Jul 12 '12 at 20:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, if I understood your question correctly, no instance of B is being "passed down" in your code. Dynamic dispatch will simply cause the myMethod() implementation in the actual type of a to be called with an instance of B as argument.

While it may be tedious to have to write the argument explicitly every time you implement myMethod(), there's nothing wrong with it.

The alternative is to give each subclass/implementation of A an attribute of type B. In this case, however, you would have to pass your B instance down the chain of constructors to the class that actually has your B attribute.

Your code would become:

public class A{
  C c;

  public A(C c) {
    this.c = c;
}


public interface C{
    public void myMethod(B b);
}

public abstract class CC {
  protected B b;

public CC(B b) {
  this.b = b;

public class D extends CC implements C {
    public D(B b) {
      super(b);
    }
    public void myMethod(){
        b.changeState();
    }
}

public class E extends CC implements C {
    public E(B b) {
      super(b);
    }
    public void myMethod(){
        b.changeState();
    }
}

And then somewhere, e.g. in Container's constructor:

b = new B();
a = new A(new E(b));
share|improve this answer
    
So I have two choices- pass b down to d/e or create d/e and then set a value of b to a member in d/e? –  user997112 Jul 12 '12 at 20:38
    
+1 I think this is the best answer, but if there are a lot of complicated arguments then the constructor/setter may be better (as in my answer). –  user949300 Jul 12 '12 at 20:39

You could pass the instance of B to the constructor of E. (or use a setter). That poses issues in itself, but at least it avoids having to pass B down every time you call myMethod(), which now needs no arguments.

e.g.

somewhere inside B

E myE = new E(this);

and, inside E

final B myB;
public E(B myHigherLevelThing) {
  this.myB = myHigherLevelThing;
}

public void myMethod() {
  myB.changeState();
}

Use the most general interface for the declarations, I'm a little confused about your full hierarchy so there may be room for improvement there...

share|improve this answer

I think(I'm not sure, as I am not good at java) that if you set them to final it doesn't go down the hierarchy, I mean, you can still declare a variale with the same name.

share|improve this answer
    
Eh? Im basically asking how can I modify a class which is at the top of a hierarchy, from classes which are very low down in the hierarchy of inheritance/interfaces :) –  user997112 Jul 12 '12 at 20:25
    
final tag is used to bypass reflection closure, has nothing to do with polymorphism. –  Hans Z Jul 12 '12 at 20:33
    
final is not used to bypass reflection closure. it's simply a keyword to indicate to the compiler that the value of that variable will not change. One effect this has is that anonymous subclasses can use that variable (i won't get into a deep explanation of why here). Another effect is that it allows to compiler to optimize certain things as well if it knows the value won't change. –  Matt Jul 12 '12 at 21:09

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