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I have a problem with a small C# application. The application has to connect through a serial port to a bar code scanner which reads a Data Matrix code. The Data Matrix code represents an array of bytes which is a zip archive. I read a lot about the way SerialPort.DataReceived work but I can't find an elegant solution to my problem. And the application should work with different bar code scanners so i can't make it scanner specific. Here is some of my code:

    using System;
    using System.IO;
    using System.IO.Ports;
    using System.Windows.Forms;
    using Ionic.Zip;

    namespace SIUI_PE
    {
        public partial class Form1 : Form
        {
            SerialPort _serialPort;

        public Form1()
        {

            InitializeComponent();


        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            try
            {
                _serialPort = new SerialPort("COM1", 9600, Parity.None, 8, StopBits.One);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Error:" + ex.ToString());
                return;
            }
            _serialPort.Handshake = Handshake.None;
            _serialPort.ReadBufferSize = 10000;
            _serialPort.DataReceived += new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler(comPort_DataReceived);
            _serialPort.Open();

        }
        void comPort_DataReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
        {
           byte[] data = new byte[10000];
           _serialPort.Read(data, 0, 10000);
           File.WriteAllBytes(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory() + "/temp/fis.zip", data);
             try
             {
                 using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory() + "/temp/fis.zip"))
                 {
                     foreach (ZipEntry ZE in zip)
                     {
                         ZE.Extract(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory() + "/temp");
                     }
                 }
                 File.Delete(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory() + "/temp/fis.zip");

             }
             catch (Exception ex1)
             {
                 MessageBox.Show("Corrupt Archive: " + ex1.ToString());

             }
        }

    }
}

So my question is: How can I know that I read all the bytes the scanner sent?

share|improve this question
    
The core problem is your _serialPort.Read() call. It has a return value that you cannot ignore. It will not be 10000, it will be however many bytes happened to be received at the time you called it. Which is typically a couple, certainly not the entire set of bytes that make up the .zip content. You'll need to buffer what you read. And you need to know when you got them all. Which is something you'll have to find out, read the barcode scanner manual carefully. – Hans Passant Jul 12 '12 at 21:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code I've got for reading barcode data, which has been working flawlessly in production for several years looks like this:

Note, my app has to read standard UPC barcodes as well as GS1 DataBar, so there's a bit of code you may not need...

The key line in this is:

string ScanData = ScannerPort.ReadExisting(); 

which is found in the DoScan section, and simply reads the scan data as a string. It bypasses the need to know how many bytes are sent, and makes the rest of the code easier to deal with.


     // This snippet is in the Form_Load event, and it initializes teh scanner
        InitializeScanner();
        ScannerPort.ReadExisting();
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
     // ens snippet from Form_Load.

        this.ScannerPort.DataReceived += new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler(ScannerPort_DataReceived);


delegate void DoScanCallback();  // used for updating the form UI

void DoScan()
    {
        if (this.txtCouponCount.InvokeRequired)
        {
            DoScanCallback d = new DoScanCallback(DoScan);
            this.Invoke(d);
            return;
        }
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);
        string ScanData = ScannerPort.ReadExisting();
        if (isInScanMode)
        {
            try
            {
                HandleScanData(ScanData);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                     System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();
                     MessageBox.Show("Invalid Scan");
            }
        }
    }
    void ScannerPort_DataReceived(object sender, System.IO.Ports.SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
    {
        // this call to sleep allows the scanner to receive the entire scan.
        // without this sleep, we've found that we get only a partial scan.
        try
        {
            DoScan();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
                System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();
                MessageBox.Show("Unable to handle scan event in ScannerPort_DataReceived." + System.Environment.NewLine + ex.ToString());
        }

    }
    void Port_ErrorReceived(object sender, System.IO.Ports.SerialErrorReceivedEventArgs e)
    {

          System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();
          MessageBox.Show(e.EventType.ToString());
    }
    private void HandleScanData(string ScanData)
    {
        //MessageBox.Show(ScanData + System.Environment.NewLine + ScanData.Length.ToString());

        //Determine which type of barcode has been scanned, and handle appropriately.
        if (ScanData.StartsWith("A") && ScanData.Length == 14)
        {
            try
            {
                ProcessUpcCoupon(ScanData);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                     System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();
                     MessageBox.Show("Unable to process UPC coupon data" + System.Environment.NewLine + ex.ToString());

            }
        }
        else if (ScanData.StartsWith("8110"))
        {
            try
            {
                ProcessDataBarCoupon(ScanData);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                     System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();
                     MessageBox.Show("Unable to process DataBar coupon data" + System.Environment.NewLine + ex.ToString());
            }
        }
        else
        {
                System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();
                MessageBox.Show("Invalid Scan" + System.Environment.NewLine + ScanData);
        }


    }


    private void InitializeScanner()
    {
        try
        {
            ScannerPort.PortName = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerPort;
            ScannerPort.ReadBufferSize = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerReadBufferSize;
            ScannerPort.Open();
            ScannerPort.BaudRate = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerBaudRate;
            ScannerPort.DataBits = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerDataBit;
            ScannerPort.StopBits = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerStopBit;
            ScannerPort.Parity = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerParity;
            ScannerPort.ReadTimeout = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerReadTimeout;
            ScannerPort.DtrEnable = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerDtrEnable;
            ScannerPort.RtsEnable = Properties.Settings.Default.ScannerRtsEnable;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Unable to initialize scanner.  The error message received will be shown next.  You should close this program and try again.  If the problem persists, please contact support.", "Error initializing scanner");
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
            Application.Exit();
        }


    }
share|improve this answer
1  
When was the last time you looked at that code David? I'm guessing that sometime between then and now you have learned that specifying a MessageBoxIcon to the MessageBox.Show call will result in an appropriate sound being played ;) – Tergiver Jul 12 '12 at 21:11
    
A LONG long time ago. (In a galaxy far, far away, to boot.) As I said, it's been working for years, and I normally don't do WinForms apps. That's funny. I'll fix that if/when I need to update it. Thanks! – David Jul 12 '12 at 21:13

As stated in the doc for SerialPort.DataReceived, "Use the BytesToRead property to determine how much data is left to be read in the buffer."

here is the doc for SerialPort.BytesToRead

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.ports.serialport.bytestoread.aspx

share|improve this answer

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