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I got a weird problem of MySQL index. I have a table views_video:

CREATE TABLE `views_video` (
  `video_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `record_date` date NOT NULL,
  `region` char(2) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `views` mediumint(8) unsigned NOT NULL
  PRIMARY KEY (`video_id`,`record_date`,`region`),
  KEY `video_id` (`video_id`)
)

The table contains 3.4 million records.

I run the EXPLAIN on this query SELECT video_id, views FROM views_video where video_id <= 156, I got:

+----+-------------+-------------+-------+------------------+----------+---------+------+--------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table       | type  | possible_keys    | key      | key_len | ref  | rows   | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------------+-------+------------------+----------+---------+------+--------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | views_video | range | PRIMARY,video_id | video_id | 2       | NULL | 587984 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-------------+-------+------------------+----------+---------+------+--------+-------------+

But when I run the EXPLAIN on this query SELECT video_id, views FROM views_video where video_id <= 157, I got:

+----+-------------+-------------+------+------------------+------+---------+------+---------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table       | type | possible_keys    | key  | key_len | ref  | rows    | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------------+------+------------------+------+---------+------+---------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | views_video | ALL  | PRIMARY,video_id | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 3412892 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-------------+------+------------------+------+---------+------+---------+-------------+

video_id is from 1 to 1034. There is nothing special between 156 and 157.

What happens here?

* update *

I have added more data into the database. Now video_id is from 1 to 1064. And the table now has 3.8M records. And the difference become 114 and 115.

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How much records are with id 158+ and with 157 ? –  SergeS Jul 12 '12 at 21:09
    
@SergeS 157: 7.5K, 158+:2.7M –  xuc Jul 12 '12 at 21:10
    
Ok, then is there any significat speed difference between this two queries ? If not, then cause can be something on lower level, don't bother –  SergeS Jul 12 '12 at 21:14
    
@SergeS no big difference, but why? –  xuc Jul 12 '12 at 21:17
    
is this a MyISAM table? –  ypercube Jul 12 '12 at 21:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm guessing that with 3.4 million records, and only 1064 possible entries for your key, your selectivity is very low. (In other words, there are many duplicates, which makes it far less useful as a key.) The optimizer is taking its best guess if it is more efficient to use the key or not. You've found a threshold for that decision.

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If you've added/deleted substantial data since creating the table, it's worthwhile to try ANALYZE TABLE on it. It frequently solves a lot of phantom indexing issues, and it's very fast even on large tables.

Update: Also, the unique index values are very low compared to the number of rows in the table. MySQL won't use indexes when a single index value points to too many rows. Try constraining the query further with another column that's part of the primary key.

share|improve this answer
    
this is correct –  Sebas Jul 12 '12 at 21:35

It might be the key population

Run these

SELECT (COUNT(1)/20) INTO @FivePctOfData FROM views_video;
SELECT COUNT(1) videpidcount,video_id FROM FROM views_video
WHERE id <= 157 GROUP BY video_id;

The query optimizer proabably took a vacation when one one of the key hit the 5% threshold.

You said there are 3.4 million rows. 5% would be 170,000. Perhaps this number was exceeded at some point in the query optimizer's life cycle on your query.

share|improve this answer
    
Does that mean if number of rows is big, index doesn't work? –  xuc Jul 12 '12 at 21:31

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