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Suppose I have a large matrix:

M <- matrix(rnorm(1e7),nrow=20)

Further suppose that each column represents a sample. Say I would like to apply t.test() to each column, is there a way to do this that is much faster than using apply()?

apply(M, 2, t.test)

It took slightly less than 2 minutes to run the analysis on my computer:

> system.time(invisible( apply(M, 2, t.test)))
user  system elapsed 
113.513   0.663 113.519 
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apply is very flexible function and thus includes lots of things you don't need in any particular case. Probably coding same logic manually with for loop will give some performance increase. –  ffriend Jul 12 '12 at 21:49
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you have a multicore machine there are some gains from using all the cores, for example using mclapply.

> library(multicore)
> M <- matrix(rnorm(40),nrow=20)
> x1 <- apply(M, 2, t.test)
> x2 <- mclapply(1:dim(M)[2], function(i) t.test(M[,i]))
> all.equal(x1, x2)
[1] "Component 1: Component 9: 1 string mismatch" "Component 2: Component 9: 1 string mismatch"
# str(x1) and str(x2) show that the difference is immaterial

This mini-example shows that things go as we planned. Now scale up:

> M <- matrix(rnorm(1e7), nrow=20)
> system.time(invisible(apply(M, 2, t.test)))
   user  system elapsed 
101.346   0.626 101.859
> system.time(invisible(mclapply(1:dim(M)[2], function(i) t.test(M[,i]))))
  user  system elapsed 
55.049   2.527  43.668

This is using 8 virtual cores. Your mileage may vary. Not a huge gain, but it comes from very little effort.

EDIT

If you only care about the t-statistic itself, extracting the corresponding field ($statistic) makes things a bit faster, in particular in the multicore case:

> system.time(invisible(apply(M, 2, function(c) t.test(c)$statistic)))
   user  system elapsed 
 80.920   0.437  82.109 
> system.time(invisible(mclapply(1:dim(M)[2], function(i) t.test(M[,i])$statistic)))
   user  system elapsed 
 21.246   1.367  24.107

Or even faster, compute the t value directly

my.t.test <- function(c){
  n <- sqrt(length(c))
  mean(c)*n/sd(c)
}

Then

> system.time(invisible(apply(M, 2, function(c) my.t.test(c))))
   user  system elapsed 
 21.371   0.247  21.532 
> system.time(invisible(mclapply(1:dim(M)[2], function(i) my.t.test(M[,i]))))
   user  system elapsed 
144.161   8.658   6.313 
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I think I will just compute t statistics directly, which as you showed, is much faster. –  Alex Jul 12 '12 at 22:28
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You can do better than this with the colttests function from the genefilter package (on Bioconductor).

> library(genefilter)
> M <- matrix(rnorm(40),nrow=20)
> my.t.test <- function(c){
+   n <- sqrt(length(c))
+   mean(c)*n/sd(c)
+ }
> x1 <- apply(M, 2, function(c) my.t.test(c))
> x2 <- colttests(M, gl(1, nrow(M)))[,"statistic"]
> all.equal(x1, x2)
[1] TRUE
> M <- matrix(rnorm(1e7), nrow=20)
> system.time(invisible(apply(M, 2, function(c) my.t.test(c))))
   user  system elapsed 
 27.386   0.004  27.445 
> system.time(invisible(colttests(M, gl(1, nrow(M)))[,"statistic"]))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.412   0.000   0.414

Ref: "Computing thousands of test statistics simultaneously in R", SCGN, Vol 18 (1), 2007, http://stat-computing.org/newsletter/issues/scgn-18-1.pdf.

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(+1) Good to know, and thanks for the reference. –  chl Jul 13 '12 at 9:48
    
Very good to know. Thanks!! –  Alex Jul 17 '12 at 11:43
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