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Well, I don't know if this post have the correct title. Feel free to change it.

Ok, this is my scenario:

pluginA.php

function info(){
   return "Plugin A";
}

pluginB.php

function info(){
   return "Plugin B";
}

Finally, I have a plugin manager that is in charge of import all plugins info to pool array:
Manager.php

class Manager
{
    protected $pool;

    public function loadPluginsInfo()
    {
        $plugin_names = array("pluginA.php", "pluginB.php");

        foreach ($plugin_names as $name) 
        {
            include_once $name;
            $this->pool[] = info(); 
        }
    }
}

The problem here is that when I print pool array it only show me the info on the first plugin loaded. I supposed that the file inclusing override the info because it still calling the info() method from the first include.

Is there a way to include the info of both plugins having the info() function with the same name for all plugins files?

Thank you in advance

PS: a fatal cannot redeclare error is never hurled

share|improve this question
1  
why you don't create in pluginA.php the Class PluginA? so you can acces to the info method PluginA::Info(); (that's OOP) –  David Jul 12 '12 at 21:29
    
I had that option, but I don't know how to instanciate a class dynamically by that way, because I only can get the plugin file name –  manix Jul 12 '12 at 21:31
    
You'd be trying to redefine the info() function, which PHP doesn't allow. so only the FIRST instance of info() will get defined (plugin A), and the rest will get ignored. –  Marc B Jul 12 '12 at 21:33
1  
Usually, this should throw a fatal cannot redeclare error. You can use David's suggestion in the same way as your code is, just replace $this->pool[] = info(); with $tmp = new $name(); $this->pool[] = $tmp->info(); –  32bitfloat Jul 12 '12 at 21:35
    
@32bitfloat is right! you cannot define the same method twice - it will not compile! –  alfasin Jul 12 '12 at 21:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can use the dynamic way to create plugin classes

plugin class

class PluginA
{
    public function info()
    {
        return 'info'; //the plugin info
    }
}

manager class

class Manager
{
    protected $pool;

    public function loadPluginsInfo()
    {
        $plugin_names = array("pluginA", "pluginB"); //Plugin names

        foreach ($plugin_names as $name) 
        {
            $file = $name . '.php';
            if(file_exists($file))
            {
                require_once($file); //please use require_once
                $class = new $name(/* parameters ... */); //create new plugin object

                //now you can call the info method like: $class->info();
            }                
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
No more adding to the pool though? –  quickshiftin Jul 12 '12 at 21:39
    
if you want to do that, you can do it ;) –  David Jul 12 '12 at 21:40
    
Thank you @David, Nice solution! ...and the rest of people thank you so much too! –  manix Jul 13 '12 at 14:57

Are you sure the interpreter isn't choking w/ a fatal error? It should be since you're trying to define the info function twice here.

There are many ways to achieve what you want, one way as in @David's comment above would be to use classes, eg.

class PluginA
{
  function info() { return 'Plugin A'; }
}

class PluginB
{
  function info() { return 'Plugin B'; }
}

then the Manager class would be something like this:

class Manager
{
    protected $pool;

    public function loadPluginsInfo()
    {
        $plugin_names = array("PluginA", "PluginB");

        foreach ($plugin_names as $name) 
        {
            include_once $name . '.php';
            $this->pool[] = new $name();
        }
    }
}

Now you have an instance of each plugin class loaded, so to get the info for a plugin you would have $this->pool[0]->info(); for the first plugin. I would recommend going w/ an associative array though so you can easily reference a given plugin. To do this, the assignment to the pool would become:

$this->pool[$name] = new name();

And then you can say:

$this->pool['PluginA']->info();

for example.

There are many other ways to do it. Now that 5.3 is mainstream you could just as easily namespace your groups of functions, but I would still recommend the associative array for the pool as you can reference a plugin in constant time, rather than linear.

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1  
You should first check whether the file is in place to avoid runtime errors –  David Jul 12 '12 at 21:41
    
Yes, this is true; a combination of your and my answer FTW! –  quickshiftin Jul 12 '12 at 22:35

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