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I have three different tables in my MySQL database.

table users: (id, score, name)
table teams: (id, title)
table team_Members: (team_id, user_id)

What I would like to do is to have 1 query that finds every team ID a given user ID is member of, along with the following information:

  1. total number of members in that team
  2. the name of the team
  3. users rank within the team (based on score)

EDIT:

Desired output should look like this;

TITLE (of the group)      NUM_MEMBERS       RANK
------------------------------------------------
Foo bar team              5                 2
Another great group       34                17
.
.
.

The query should be based on the users ID.

Help is greatly appreciated

share|improve this question
    
Can you edit your question to provide some sample data and the output you'd like from that data? –  Ken White Jul 12 '12 at 22:29
    
You'll have one BIG query :P –  PhD Jul 12 '12 at 22:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this query should get what you ask for

select t.id, t.title, count(m.user_id) members, (
    select count(1)
    from users u3 
    inner join team_Members m3 on u3.id = m3.user_id 
    and m3.team_id = t.id and u3.score > (
        select score from users where name = 'Johan'
    )
) + 1 score
from teams t
inner join team_Members m on t.id = m.team_id
where t.id in (
    select team_id 
    from team_Members m2
    inner join users u2 on m2.user_id = u2.id
    where u2.name = 'Johan'
)
group by t.id, t.title
share|improve this answer
    
Note that the name goes into two places ;), otherwize I think the query would be even more complex. –  David Mårtensson Jul 12 '12 at 23:01
    
This is almost what I was looking for. Thanks for the inspiration on making an entire new select as a field! –  Frank Gordon Jul 13 '12 at 8:00

To collect you just need use JOIN

SELECT 
  u.*, t.*, tm.* 
FROM 
  users u 
JOIN 
  team_Members tm ON  u.id = tm.user_id 
JOIN 
  teams t ON t.id = tm.team_id;

To get total of number of that team use COUNT with some group key

Some like that

SELECT 
  COUNT(t.id), u.*, t.*, tm.* 
FROM 
  users u 
JOIN 
  team_Members tm ON u.id = tm.user_id 
JOIN 
  teams t ON t.id = tm.team_id GROUP BY t.id;

And to rank just:

SELECT 
  COUNT(t.id) as number_of_members, u.*, t.*, tm.* 
FROM 
  users u 
JOIN 
  team_Members tm ON u.id = tm.user_id 
JOIN 
  teams t ON t.id = tm.team_id 
GROUP BY t.id 
ORDER BY u.score;
share|improve this answer
    
There's no penalty here for putting some sort of line breaks in your SQL to avoid nasty horizontal scrolling and make your answer more easily read. :-) We actually appreciate it. Thanks. –  Ken White Jul 12 '12 at 23:08
    
You are right, thanks for your edit –  GTSouza Jul 12 '12 at 23:09

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