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I know I can easily work around this, but I'm looking for the best practice in this case. This is a simplified version http://jsbin.com/isered/3/edit. I'm trying create a function for reuse but I need it so that when the event is triggered (i.e. clicking on the anchor tag), it only appends the output area once, not for each time the function has been called.

Jquery/Javascript

$(function () {

   function foo () {
      $('a').on('click', function () {
      $('.asdf').append('poo');
    });
   }

   foo ();
   foo ();
});

HTML

<a href='#'>hello</a>
<a href='#'>world</a>

<p class='asdf'></p>
share|improve this question
    
A working demo is great, but if the JSBin link rots, this question has no useful content. Could you provide the relevant code in the question as well? –  Matt Ball Jul 13 '12 at 0:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could unbind the events before binding them:

function foo () {
  $('a').off('click').on('click', function () {
      $('.asdf').append('poo');       
  });
}

Though I don't understand why calling the function once and only once is not the best solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll give this a shot. Again, this is a much simpler example than the one I have. –  Ryan Grush Jul 13 '12 at 0:20
    
this is the shortest fix so I'll give it to you. –  Ryan Grush Jul 13 '12 at 0:25

You can make a state variable, in this case a class:

$(function () {
  function foo() {
    $('a:not(.clicked)').on('click', function() {
      $(this).addClass('clicked');
      $('.asdf').append('poo');
    });
  }

  foo();
  foo();
});
share|improve this answer
    
I figured toggling a class/variable would be one way to solve it. I awarded the other answer just b/c it was a little less code, but this would definitely be effective as well. Thanks! –  Ryan Grush Jul 13 '12 at 0:28
    
I'm glad you did. Now I know how to do it without classes as well ;) –  Blender Jul 13 '12 at 0:28

I usually encounter this when I want to make a container only once but process the rest of the function on subsequent clicks as well. In that case, I put a check for the container's existence as follows:

var foo = function(){
    $('a').on('click', function(ev){
       if (!$('.asdf .foo').length) {
           $('.asdf').append('<div class="foo">');
       }
       // do other click stuff here
    });
};
share|improve this answer

Underscore.js already has this function.

So why re-invent the wheel.

_.once(function) Creates a version of the function that can only be called one time. Repeated calls to the modified function will have no effect, returning the value from the original call. Useful for initialization functions, instead of having to set a boolean flag and then check it later.

Example:

$(function () {

  var foo = _.once(function() {
    $('a').on('click', function () {
      $('.asdf').append('poo');       
    });
  });

  foo ();
  foo ();
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Could you make the font a tad larger? –  Blender Jul 13 '12 at 0:19
    
Trying not to add another library if I can help it –  Ryan Grush Jul 13 '12 at 0:19
    
@Blender - Unfortunately, that's as big as it gets. :) –  Brandon Boone Jul 13 '12 at 0:20
    
Also, this code doesn't do what you think it does. Once you call foo(), the event will bind to the elements and clicking on them will result in the same behavior multiple times. It won't really solve the OP's problem. –  Blender Jul 13 '12 at 0:20
    
@Blender - Not sure I follow. Though Matt's answer is certainly the way to go (no need to add a whole library for this), from what I can tell his answer and my answer are producing the same end result. Though I may certainly be missing something. –  Brandon Boone Jul 13 '12 at 0:38
$(function () {
    function foo () {
        $('a').on('click', function () {
            var num = $('.asdf').text().length;
            if (num == 0) {
                $('.asdf').append('poopsicles');
            }
        });
    }

    foo();
    foo();
});

I guess this question has already been answered, but here ya go.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Brandon, i was just reading how you have indent by four spaces for your code to show up properly. –  kenecaswell Jul 13 '12 at 0:42
1  
Hey no problem! Here's a tip that'll help you out in the future. Instead of tediously adding the spaces, you can highlight your text and press the code formatting button in the top edit bar. It'll do the indenting for you and will certainly save you a bunch of time when trying to be the first one with an answer. –  Brandon Boone Jul 13 '12 at 0:52
    
@BrandonBoone nice to know ... @ kenecaswell glad someone else picked up on the 'poo' reference ;) –  Ryan Grush Jul 13 '12 at 1:06

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