Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The problem exists in MySQL's newest version, so I even doubt that that may be a bug.

Here are two tables:

t1(id int), values (10),(2)
t2(id int), values (0),(null),(1)

Execute:

select id from t1 where id > all (select id from t2);

Return result set:

+------+
| id   |
+------+
|   10 |
|    2 |
+------+

According to my knowledge and the page http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/all-subqueries.html

The statement should return empty result! Because each judgement in "where" leads to null, like this:

select id > all (select id from t2)  as c1 from t1;

returns:

+------+
| c1   |
+------+
| NULL |
| NULL |
+------+

and actually select id from t1 where null; returns nothing!

Finally, I tried this:

explain extended select id from t1 where id > all (select id from t2);
show warnings;
+-------+------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Level | Code | Message                                                                                                                             |
+-------+------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Note  | 1003 | select `test`.`t1`.`id` AS `id` from `test`.`t1` where <not>((`test`.`t1`.`id` <= (select max(`test`.`t2`.`id`) from `test`.`t2`))) |
+-------+------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

1 row in set (0.00 sec)

We can see that MySQL optimizes the original SQL to this one, which actually fits the result set.

but I not think the optimized SQL equals the original one .

Am I wrong?

share|improve this question
2  
I agree with you. Bug in MySQL. The transformation in Michael's answer is not semantically valid in the presence of nulls. – Martin Smith Jul 15 '12 at 14:48
    
BTW: For me on 5.1.48-community the following query returns no rows as expected SELECT 1 FROM DUAL WHERE 10 > ALL (SELECT 0 UNION ALL SELECT NULL) and the explain plan says "Impossible Where". What version are you on? – Martin Smith Jul 15 '12 at 15:05
    
@MartinSmith MySQL(by internally transforming the > ALL on WHERE clause to a MAX construct) had made the invalid valid ;-) Hatin' MySQL now, it can redeem itself though, as you've stated it returns empty row now on version 5.1.48-community. +1 to your insights, it's a bug of MySQL(older version), it's a flawed design – Michael Buen Jul 15 '12 at 15:54
1  
@carl: +1 for catching this bug. I'm surprised no-one had found it previously. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jul 15 '12 at 16:14
2  

Update: Upon further analysis and unfolding of MySQL's > ALL odd implementation. This answer should be considered as MySQL-specific. So for further disclaimer, explanation on answer here regarding > ALL is not applicable to other RDBMSes (unless there are other RDBMSes that copied MySQL implementation). Internal translation from > ALL to a MAX construct, applies to MySQL only.

This:

select id from t1 where id > all (select id from t2); 

is semantically equivalent to:

select id from t1 where id > (select max(id) from t2); 

Since select max(id) from t2 returns 1, the second query materializes to this:

select id from t1 where id > 1

That's why it returns both 10 and 2 from table t1


One of the instances where NULL rules is being applied is when you use NOT IN, an example:

DDL:

create table t1(id int);

insert into t1 values (10),(2);


create table t2(id int); 

insert into t2 values (0),(null),(1);

Query:

select * from t1 where id not in (select id from t2);

-- above is evaluated same as the following query, so the rules about null applies,
-- hence the above and following query will not return any record.    

select * from t1 where id <> 0 and id <> null and id <> 1;



-- to eliminate null side-effect, do this:
select * from t1 where id not in (select id from t2 where id is not null);

-- which is equivalent to this:
select * from t1 where id <> 0 and id <> 1;

The last two queries returns 10 and 2, whereas the first two queries returns empty set

Live test: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/82865/1

Hope these examples erases your confusion with NULL rules.


Regarding

but I not think the optimized sql equals the original one .

Optimized sql being this:

select `test`.`t1`.`id` AS `id` from `test`.`t1` where <not>((`
test`.`t1`.`id` <= (select max(`test`.`t2`.`id`) from `test`.`t2`)))

That is really equivalent to your original query: select id from t1 where id > all (select id from t2);

The construct t1.field > all (select t2.field from t2) is just a syntactic sugar for:

t1.field > (select max(t2.field) from t2)

If you will apply DeMorgan theorem on the optimized SQL by MySql:

not (t1.id <= (select max(t2.id) from t2))

That is equivalent to:

t1.id > (select max(t2.id) from t2)

Which in turn is equivalent to the syntactic sugar ALL:

t1.id > ALL(select t2.id from t2)
share|improve this answer
2  
The initial 'semantically equivalent' rewrite of the query is only valid if the subquery can never contain a NULL. If the subquery can return nulls, the rewrite is not valid. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 15 '12 at 15:39
    
here comes the difference between common logic in sql and actual engines behaviours... – Sebas Jul 15 '12 at 16:00
    
@JonathanLeffler I concur. It's the flawed implementation(by internally transforming > ALL to MAX construct) of MySQL that muddles up the NULL rules on ALL subquery. The semantically equivalent only holds true when the subquery don't have any NULLs in it, otherwise they are different beast altogether. Perhaps to make a better analogy, MySQL(old version)'s ALL is a chimera ツ – Michael Buen Jul 15 '12 at 16:03
    
RE: chimera. I might mean chupacabara there ツ – Michael Buen Jul 15 '12 at 16:38

This is a bug in MySQL (Reported and verified here).

The fix will be available in 5.6.7 (next 5.6x version) as well as in the next major tree (5.7x)

It differs from the stated behaviour in the MySQL docs and that prescribed in the ANSI standard.

Moreover it is not even consistent in MySQL and you get different results when the sub query references a table compared to when the sub query contains (the same) literal values.

CREATE TABLE t2
  (
     id INT
  );

INSERT INTO t2
VALUES      (0),
            (NULL),
            (1);

/*Returns row with 10*/
SELECT *
FROM   (SELECT 10 AS id) T
WHERE  id > ALL (SELECT id
                 FROM   t2);

/*Returns no rows. Explain Plan says "Impossible Where"*/
SELECT *
FROM   (SELECT 10 AS id) T
WHERE  id > ALL (SELECT 0
                 UNION ALL
                 SELECT NULL
                 UNION ALL
                 SELECT 1); 

The second behaviour is correct per the spec. How 10 > ALL( (0),(null),(1) ) ought to be logically evaluated as follows

10 > 0 =  TRUE
10 > NULL =  UNKNOWN
10 > 1 =  TRUE

Under the rules of three valued logic

TRUE AND UNKNOWN AND TRUE = UNKNOWN

So this row should not be returned. See the ANSI specification which clearly states

The result of "R <comp op> <quantifier> T" is derived by the application of the implied <comparison predicate> "R <comp op> RT" to every row RT in T:

Therefore this is not a semantically valid optimisation when T is Nullable. The full section of the spec is reproduced below.

8.7

     Function

     Specify a quantified comparison.

     Format

     <quantified comparison predicate> ::=
          <row value constructor> <comp op> <quantifier> <table subquery>


     <quantifier> ::= <all> | <some>

     <all> ::= ALL

     <some> ::= SOME | ANY


     Syntax Rules

     1) The <row value constructor> shall be of the same degree as the
        result of the <table subquery>.

     2) The data types of the values of the <row value constructor>
        shall be respectively comparable to those of the columns of the
        <table subquery>.

     3) The collating sequence for each pair of respective values in
        the <quantified comparison predicate> is determined in the same
        manner as described in Subclause 8.2, "<comparison predicate>".

     Access Rules

        None.

     General Rules

     1) Let R be the result of the <row value constructor> and let T be
        the result of the <table subquery>.

     2) The result of "R <comp op> <quantifier> T" is derived by the
        application of the implied <comparison predicate> "R <comp op>
        RT" to every row RT in T:

        Case:

        a) If T is empty or if the implied <comparison predicate> is
          true for every row RT in T, then "R <comp op> <all> T" is
          true.

        b) If the implied <comparison predicate> is false for at least
          one row RT in T, then "R <comp op> <all> T" is false.

        c) If the implied <comparison predicate> is true for at least
          one row RT in T, then "R <comp op> <some> T" is true.

        d) If T is empty or if the implied <comparison predicate> is
          false for every row RT in T, then "R <comp op> <some> T" is
          false.

        e) If "R <comp op> <quantifier> T" is neither true nor false,
          then it is unknown.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This explains it well. MySQL's ALL had almost reinvented my notion of null handling on ALL subquery :D Its internal translation of ALL to MAX really muddled up my understanding of null handling on ALL subquery – Michael Buen Jul 15 '12 at 15:40

Update (2012-07-15) The problem is confined to MySQL only, perhaps I was confused while tabbing between many sqlfiddle tabs on Chrome. There's no problem on Postgresql, its NULL behavior is consistent on both its SELECT and WHERE clause, same with Sql Server.

Adamantly, I'm as confused as you now, I tried your MySql query on Sql Server: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!3/82865/6

-- query 1
select 
    case when id > all(select id from t2) then 1 else 0 end as c1
from t1;


-- query 2
select 
    *
from t1
where id > all(select id from t2);

The first query returns 0 to all rows.

| C1 |
------
|  0 |
|  0 |

Naturally, the second query (which has a WHERE clause) should not return any rows. Which Sql Server rightfully do. While I don't agree with 0 as being the result for column C1 (it should be 1), I applaud Sql Server for being consistent.

Then on your MySql query on both MySql ( http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/82865/25 ) and Postgresql ( http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!1/82865/5 ):

-- query 1
select 
    id > all(select id from t2) as c1
from t1;


-- query 2
select 
    *
from t1
where id > all(select id from t2);

MySql and Postgresql both yielded same output:

MySql yield this output:

|     C1 |
----------
| (null) |
| (null) |


| ID |
------
| 10 |
|  2 |

I believe the second query has the correct output, but the embedded condition on SELECT clause(first query) indicates otherwise. I dislike this inconsistency.

Striked paragraph amendment: MySQL has the problem. Postgresql implementation is correct, both its SELECT clause and WHERE clause yields the same result, it returns NULLs on SELECT, and it return empty row on WHERE clause.

Now, I wanted to ask this question on Postgresql or MySql forums why there is discrepancy on results between a condition on WHERE clause and a condition embedded on SELECT clause.

I hope there's a kindred soul in stackoverflow who can further explain this inconsistency for us :-)


No matter how sweet the syntatic sugar ALL is, I'm not inclined to use it anymore. It has inconsistent result between on WHERE clause and embedded on SELECT. I uses MAX on all my queries anyway, IMHO the intent is clearer than English-like ALL, the more reason I need to continue using MAX:

Striked paragraph amendment: We should not develop aversion to ALL just because MySQL has flawed implementation ;-)

On both MySql and Postgresql, MAX yield the same output

-- Query 1
select 
    id > all(select id from t2) as c1,
    id > (select max(id) from t2) as c2
from t1;


-- Query 2
select 
    *
from t1
where id > all(select id from t2);


-- Query 3
select 
    *
from t1
where id > (select max(id) from t2);

The MAX output is consistent on both RDBMS.

-- Query 1 output:

|     C1 | C2 |
---------------
| (null) |  1 |
| (null) |  1 |



-- Query 2 output:

MySql return this:

| ID |
------
| 10 |
|  2 |

Postgresql return empty row. Which is correct



-- Query 3 output:

| ID |
------
| 10 |
|  2 |


Furthermore, MAX is consistent among all RDBMS:

select 
    case when id > all(select id from t2) then 'Yes' else 'Oh No!' end as c1,
    case when id > (select max(id) from t2) then 'Yes' else 'Oh No!' end as c2
from t1;


select 
    *
from t1
where id > all(select id from t2);


select 
    *
from t1
where id > (select max(id) from t2);

Live test:



To nail it, it's only MySQL that implements id > ALL to id > (SELECT MAX. Both Postgresql and Sql Server interprets id > ALL(0,NULL,1) as id > 0 AND id > NULL AND id > 1, hence both Postgresql and Sql Server yields same output.

Illumination on NULL rules come from Martin Smith insights on NULL values are excluded. Why?

MySQL's ALL problem is isolated to MySQL only, it's very inconsistent. MySQL translate ALL to MAX on its WHERE clause; while on its SELECT clause, MySQL translate ALL to chained ANDs.

Other RDBMSes implement > ALL as chained ANDs, rules on NULL on ALL expression applies to both of their SELECT clause and WHERE clause, they have consistent results on both SELECT clause and WHERE clause. And their rules on NULL on ALL is ANSQL SQL-compliant

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! Before this problem ,I thought I knew how "NULL" works.But this confused me. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/all-subqueries.html There is an example just look like this,but the conclusion is different from yours."The expression is unknown (that is, NULL) if table t2 contains (0,NULL,1). " Who can help? Or this is a bug ?! – carl Jul 13 '12 at 3:04
    
"Who can help?" There are some MySql and Postgresql core devs on Stackoverflow, I hope they get to see this question and answer. It feels like a bug, I didn't expect the SELECT clause can't mirror what's happening on WHERE clause; however, seeing exactly same results on both MySql and Postgresql, I can't be 100% sure – Michael Buen Jul 13 '12 at 3:17
    
@carl Found the answer, it's a flaw on MySQL part only. Upon further inspection, Postgresql's output is not similar to MySQL, perhaps I was confused while switching between multiple browser tabs on sqlfiddle. There's no problem on both Postgresql and Sql Server, they have the same output. See the update on this answer – Michael Buen Jul 15 '12 at 15:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.