Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The file names.txt consists of many names in the form of:

"KELLEE","JOSLYN","JASON","INGER","INDIRA","GLINDA","GLENNIS"

Does anyone know how to split the string so that it is individual names separated by commas?

KELLEE,JOSLYN,JASON,INGER,INDIRA,GLINDA,GLENNIS

The following code splits by comma and leaves quotes around the name, what is the escape character to split out the ". Can it be done in one Split statement, splitting out "," and leaving a comma to separate?

package main

import "fmt"
import "io/ioutil"
import "strings"

func main() {
        fData, err := ioutil.ReadFile("names.txt")  // read in the external file
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println("Err is ", err)     // print any error
    }
    strbuffer := string(fData)  // convert read in file to a string

    arr := strings.Split(strbuffer, ",")

    fmt.Println(arr)

}

By the way, this is part of Project Euler problem # 22. http://projecteuler.net/problem=22

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Jeremy's answer is basically correct and does exactly what you have asked for. But the format of your "names.txt" file is actually a well known and is called CSV (comma separated values). Luckily, Go comes with an encoding/csv package (which is part of the standard library) for decoding and encoding such formats easily. In addition to your + Jeremy's solution, this package will also give exact error messages if the format is invalid, supports multi-line records and does proper unquoting of quoted strings.

The basic usage looks like this:

package main

import (
    "encoding/csv"
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    file, err := os.Open("names.txt")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println("Error:", err)
        return
    }
    defer file.Close()
    reader := csv.NewReader(file)
    for {
        record, err := reader.Read()
        if err == io.EOF {
            break
        } else if err != nil {
            fmt.Println("Error:", err)
            return
        }

        fmt.Println(record) // record has the type []string
    }
}

There is also a ReadAll method that might make your program even shorter, assuming that the whole file fits into the memory.

Update: dystroy has just pointed out that your file has only one line anyway. The CSV reader works well for that too, but the following, less general solution should also be sufficient:

for {
    if n, _ := fmt.Fscanf(file, "%q,", &name); n != 1 {
        break
    }
    fmt.Println("name:", name)
}
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't really a csv file as there is only one line : projecteuler.net/project/names.txt –  Denys Séguret Jul 13 '12 at 13:23
    
Oh, you are right. It is a CSV file with a single line :) –  tux21b Jul 13 '12 at 13:31
1  
Plus one for use of Fscanf :-) –  Jeremy Wall Jul 14 '12 at 0:41
    
@tux21b any idea how to read from string instead of open file ? I'm on the same boat except that I would like to load the data in memory to avoid touching the disk –  themihai Mar 7 '14 at 17:30
    
strings.NewReader might fit your needs –  tux21b Mar 7 '14 at 18:30

Split doesn't remove characters from the substrings. Your split is fine you just need to process the slice afterwards with strings.Trim(val, "\"").

for i, val := range arr {
  arr[i] = strings.Trim(val, "\"")
}

Now arr will have the leading and trailing "s removed.

share|improve this answer
1  
Note that this won't work for: "Smithe, P.", "Bloggs, J." –  Timmmm Jan 5 at 10:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.